HoopsHype MLB rumors

June 30, 2014 Updates

James Harden — similar to the newest Milwaukee Buck, Jabari Parker — threw out the first pitch for his Houston Astros on Sunday when they were taking on the Detroit Tigers. He throws a decent pitch, but it’s his wardrobe choice that caught our eye. Dime

June 1, 2014 Updates

Yes, former Minnesota Twins DH and all-around Beantown hero David Ortiz offering Love advice on leaving Minnesota for Boston. Diabolical. Love has one year remaining on his contract with the Timberwolves, and the team has said it would be open to at least listen to offers to move him. For The Win

April 23, 2014 Updates

Former NBA star Tracy McGrady has made the opening day roster of the Sugar Land Skeeters as a pitcher, manager Gary Gaetti told KRIV-TV in Houston on Wednesday. "Tracy is on the team," Gaetti told KRIV. "He's just done what needed to be done since the idea came about. He showed enough progress. He showed enough ability and we're going to see where this goes." Gaetti told KRIV that he didn't make the decision to keep McGrady on the roster until Wednesday. The Skeeters open the regular season Thursday against Lancaster. ESPN.com

April 22, 2014 Updates
April 15, 2014 Updates

Professional athletes are among our nation’s highest-paid employees and, as such, a huge chunk of their income is plowed into the government via the IRS. In fact, federal taxes owed by professional baseball, football, and basketball players will exceed $3 billion in 2013, according to tax experts who specialize in representing athletes. And, like every other U.S. taxpayer, their bill is due today. That’s $3 billion of the $2.5 trillion paid in federal taxes by all Americans, contributed by a select but paltry work force of about 3,000. On average, every MLB, NFL and NBA player pays $1 million in federal taxes. The Fields of Green

According to data bases compiled by USA Today, players in these three major leagues alone earned nearly $9 billion in 2013. Most of that income is taxed at the highest rate of 39.6 percent, and for the first time a surcharge of .9 percent was added to the previous 1.45 percent Medicare tax employees pay on income that exceeds $250,000 to help pay for Obamacare. Even though the overall federal tax burden of nearly 42 percent for these athletes is reduced by deductions, experts say most can only claim enough in agent fees, mortgage interest, dependents and charitable donations to whittle the bill down less than 10 percent. So assuming deductions reduce the overall tax burden to 33 percent, the amount paid in federal taxes on $9 billion of earnings is still $3 billion. “You definitely look at the bottom-line [tax] figure and you go, ‘Jeesh, that’s a lot of money,’ said Colorado Rockies outfielder Michael Cuddyer, who is in the last year of a three-year, $31.5 million contract. “Then you look at the net income and you go, ‘Jeesh, that’s a lot of money too.’’’ The Fields of Green

April 8, 2014 Updates

Tim Kawakami: Multiple sources: Warriors co-owner Joe Lacob has had talks with A's owner John Fisher about Lacob's interest in buying the A's... But the sources indicate that Fisher has to this point told Lacob he is not looking to sell the A's. There are some indications that Lacob would be interested in building a baseball stadium on the Howard Terminal site. It's not just Lacob. Several big-money types are eyeing the A's. Most, I'm told, believe the first/best option is to keep them in Oakland. I'm told that any Lacob interest in the A's is now on the back-burner. But Fisher knows that he'll have a nice market if he wants to sell. Twitter @timkawakami

April 7, 2014 Updates

Erase the name "David Stern" and the phrase "basketball reasons" from your memory bank. Grab a stack of oversized Cliff Paul heads from the State Farm commercials and hold them over your heads while marching down Santa Monica Boulevard. Move on. For some reason, it still isn't happening. "I thought the city would have embraced him," Clippers forward Blake Griffin said of Paul. "I mean, it seems like everywhere we go, people love Chris. I don't know why he would get booed at a Dodger game." Los Angeles Times

April 6, 2014 Updates

When Chris Paul was shown on the big screen at Dodger Stadium on Friday during the Los Angeles Dodgers' home opener against the San Francisco Giants, he was booed louder than any Giants player on the field. The reception didn’t come as a surprise to Paul, who smiled while being jeered and playing an in-stadium trivia game with Dodgers outfielder Carl Crawford. ESPN.com

“I expected it,” Paul said on Saturday. “When they came and asked me to that thing with Carl Crawford, I said they were going to boo the life out of me. I told Cat (Belanger, the Dodgers’ broadcast and entertainment coordinator). She’s been there every time that I’ve been there for games and she was like, ‘It’s cool.’” Paul was booed last season when he threw out the first pitch to Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp along with his four-year-old son, Chris. “The craziest one is when I had ‘Little Chris’ with me,” Paul said. “But he didn’t know what was going on. Now if I take him he’ll know what’s going on.” ESPN.com

February 12, 2014 Updates

Tracy McGrady’s second career as a semi-pro baseball pitcher is very, very real. After ESPN commentator Jeff Van Gundy broke the news to the world that the former NBA superstar was eyeing a role as a relief pitcher with the Atlantic League’s Sugar Land Skeeters, McGrady himself confirmed it. Now, a Houston-area Fox affiliate has posted video footage of T-Mac throwing a bullpen session with two minor-leagues in MLB organizations. For The Win

December 18, 2013 Updates

The greatest regret of Gerald Wallace’s career lies in a field of dreams. It has nothing to do with basketball and everything to do with the sport he does not play. Thirteen seasons into his NBA career, there is still a nagging “what if” he can’t shake. The accolades, the contracts don’t extinguish a passion he has for another game. “I think out of my whole life, one of my biggest regrets is that I didn’t finish playing baseball while I was in high school,” Wallace said. HoopsWorld

Before Wallace could see how far his talents would take him, though, he was faced with a decision as the entered his freshman year of high school. That summer he hit a five-inch growth spurt and skyrocketed to over 6’4. Continuing with both sports would be difficult if he wanted to seriously pursue one. “The main thing was I was told was, ‘If you’re going to pick a career, you’ve got to pick one and you’ve got to get focused,’” Wallace said. “I figured basketball would be a lot easier for me than baseball, especially with trying to be a catcher.” HoopsWorld

October 5, 2013 Updates
August 9, 2013 Updates
August 1, 2013 Updates

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