HoopsHype NBPA rumors

November 21, 2014 Updates

Roberts said the union is prepared to file an appeal on Taylor's behalf. The second-year player pleaded guilty to misdemeanor domestic violence assault and malicious destruction of hotel property stemming from an incident in East Lansing, Mich., in late September. "The CBA contemplates a minimum 10-game suspension in any case involving a conviction for a violent felony, including domestic violence," Roberts said in her statement. "In contrast, Jeff Taylor was charged with a misdemeanor that is likely to be dismissed at the end of a probationary period. The 24-game suspension is one of the longest in the history of the league. USA Today Sports

"We have a scheme of discipline that was the result of collective bargaining between the parties that has been applied consistently over the years. While we appreciate the sensitivity of this societal issue, the Commissioner is not entitled to rewrite the rules or otherwise ignore precedent in disciplinary matters. While ultimately this is Jeff's decision, we stand ready to file an immediate appeal on his behalf." Roberts' statement was in response to NBA Commissioner Adam Silver's announcement of Taylor's suspension Wednesday, after Taylor's plea Oct. 30. USA Today Sports

November 20, 2014 Updates
November 19, 2014 Updates

Steve Kauffman: NBPA added a special person in hiring Chrysa Chin. She may have signicantly helped as many NBA players as Dr. Jack, Big Wayne & Donnie Walsh Twitter @KauffmanSports

November 16, 2014 Updates

Nazr Mohammed: Excited about the hire of @ChrysaChin by @TheNBPA. She's been an amazing mentor to me since I've been in the @NBA. #HeadedInRightDirection Twitter @NazrMohammed

November 15, 2014 Updates

Pablo Torre: The Collective Bargaining Agreement is a really long document. Have you read all of it? And, if so, what are your big takeaways? Michele Roberts: Initially it made my head explode. And I think it's still the kind of thing that you need to keep reading and reading and reading for it to make some sense. But the current CBA makes better sense now that I've read the preceding two. Because it appears to be an interesting narrative of what the league has been interested in having happen, in terms of its relationship with players, over a period of years. It wants, clearly, to do some things a) to protect itself, from itself; and b) to limit­ -- and it's almost the same thing -- to limit player salaries because it's unable to somehow get the owners to behave in a way that makes sense from an owner's perspective. In terms of some of the salary structures, it's a way to rein in the owners because they can't otherwise rein in themselves. ESPN.com

Michele Roberts: It doesn't make sense to me that you're suddenly eligible and ready to make money when you're 20, but not when you're 19, not when you're 18. In my opinion -- and we have yet to get official word from the players association -- but I suspect that the association will agree that this is not going to be one that they will agree to easily. There is no other profession, again, that says that you're old enough to die but not old enough to work. ESPN.com

PT: Does it strike you as strange that the suggestion that the players might request over 50 percent of basketball-related income, maybe materially more than 50 percent, sounds radical in this landscape? MR: Let's put it this way: I have never heard anyone complain about the amount of money George Clooney makes. No one says a peep about the fact that this guy makes probably more than the highest-paid player in the NBA. It's mind-boggling to me that people think that the players make too much given that this is a multi-billion-dollar industry, and they do not enjoy most of the money that's being made. It is insane to suggest that these men make more money than they deserve. It is insane. ESPN.com

PT: Do you see a day when there's an NBA team in Europe? Have you had conversations where players seem in favor of that? MR: Yes and yes. I think the league has an interest in seeing the game grow, and I think the players do. Our players routinely, if things aren't going well, or for whatever reason, end up playing in Europe and then come back here. Our women -- it's remarkable, they spend more time playing overseas than they spend playing at home. And sadly, some of the 18-year-olds who aren't able to make money here are playing overseas. There's more work, more opportunities to play basketball. ESPN.com

November 14, 2014 Updates
November 13, 2014 Updates

NBA commissioner Adam Silver released a statement on Tuesday in response to NBPA executive director Michele Roberts' statements about the salary cap. From the press release: Adam Silver: “We couldn't disagree more with these statements. The NBA's success is based on the collective efforts and investments of all of the team owners, the thousands of employees at our teams and arenas, and our extraordinarily talented players. No single group could accomplish this on its own. Nor is there anything unusual or “un-American” in a unionized industry to have a collective system for paying employees -- in fact, that's the norm. CBSSports.com

Adam Silver: “The Salary Cap system, which splits revenues between team owners and players and has been agreed upon by the NBA and the Players Association since 1982, has served as a foundation for the growth of the league and has enabled NBA players to become the highest paid professional athletes in the world. We will address all of these topics and others with the Players Association at the appropriate time.” CBSSports.com

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