HoopsHype Peter Guber rumors

October 29, 2014 Updates
October 28, 2014 Updates

Guber's email, which was sent from his phone and obtained by Yahoo Sports, came after the NBA announced in a news release earlier Monday that the league's 30 teams will have a record 101 international players from 37 countries and territories on opening-night rosters for the upcoming season. Warriors director of media relations Raymond Ridder forwarded the league's release in an email sent through the franchise, saying, "The following is a great example of the growth of our league. There are 101 international players on NBA opening night rosters, which represents 22% of the league. We have five [5] international players on our roster (33%), which includes Andrew Bogut, Leandro Barbosa, Festus Ezeli, Ognjen Kuzmic and Nemanja Nedovic. We've come a long way…" Guber responded to the email by writing, "I’m taking rosetta stone to learn Hungarian Serbian Australian swahili and hoodish This year. But it's nice." Yahoo! Sports

Guber's initial email was sent throughout the franchise and construed as "offensive" by at least one team employee. Late Monday, Guber sent a follow-up email saying he mistakenly typed "hoodish" and regretted the error. "Someone just brought to my attention that an email I responded to earlier contains the word 'hoodish,' which I don't even think Is a Word, and certainly not the one I intended to use," Guber wrote in the email. "I intended to type Yiddish. Either my mobile fone [sic] autocorrected or it was typed wrong. In any event I regret if anyone was unintendedly [sic] offended." Yahoo! Sports

April 22, 2014 Updates

The Warriors have moved off of their long-stated plans to build an arena at Piers 30/32 in San Francisco and have bought land a little further south. The new spot is not aesthetically ideal—not right on the water, not framed by the Bay Bridge for TV visuals, not where Joe Lacob and Peter Guber held their splashy press conference starring David Stern and Ahmad Rashad two years ago. But the "ideal" spot was Piers 30/32 and several of us have been documenting for years now that the logistics and political hurdles at Piers 30/32 were just too much. Contra Costa Times

August 16, 2013 Updates
July 19, 2013 Updates
May 21, 2012 Updates

Warriors owners Joe Lacob and Peter Guber, who have owned the team for 18 months, have made no secret of their desire to move to San Francisco. The team has held three major press conferences in San Francisco and neither has denied interest in relocation from Oakland. The plan would be to build a state-of-the-art arena at Piers 30-32, currently being unused at the time. The goal would be to move into the building by the start of the 2017-18 season. The press conference is expected to be held at this site. CSNBayArea.com

May 16, 2012 Updates

They met with Mayor Ed Lee to further discuss moving the basketball team to San Francisco to play in an arena at Piers 30-32. Lee has traveled to Los Angeles to meet with Guber and make his case and sent a letter Friday signed by all 11 members of the Board of Supervisors in attempt to lure the Warriors here from Oakland for the 2017 season. San Francisco Chronicle

April 16, 2012 Updates
March 9, 2012 Updates

It feels like Joe Lacob and Peter Guber should be getting close to some decision–their lease in Oakland runs out in 2017, and the run-up to a new arena would probably start next year in earnest. I’d guess the Warriors will tell everybody by the end of this year, at the latest, where they want to be for the long-term. So those judgments are being discussed now, you’d think. But I checked and was told quite firmly that the Warriors have made no decisions on a preferred site and would not be making any imminent announcements. They’re still looking at Oakland sites, in addition to the much-discussed site adjacent to AT&T Park, in conjunction with the Giants. I’d say the SF site is by far the leader in the clubhouse, but I guess Lacob and Guber are still not all the way to the point where they’re committed to that project. San Jose Mercury-News

January 25, 2012 Updates

Courtside before tip-off against the Orlando Magic, Golden State Warriors’ co-owner Peter Guber has his eye on the ball. Not one on the court, but rather the sphere fans are passing around in the dank upper reaches of Oracle Arena. A fast-moving spotlight struggles to follow along as it’s flicked around the stands, finally landing in a referee’s hands to start the game. “You can’t see where it is, can you?” Guber squawks with delight, thrilled by the latest gimmick he’s brought to Bay Area basketball. Sure it’s corny. But it’s working. The house is rocking, even as it falls a bit short of its sixth sellout in the first seven home games. The Warriors will lose tonight, but Guber, the longtime entertainment impresario who has done everything from movies to minor league baseball ownership, still puts on a pretty good show. Forbes.com

But Guber and Lacob will laugh last. They’ve followed a classic real estate maxim—buying the worst property in the best neighborhood. “You’re in a hot market with a lot of money and a lot of tech companies,” says Lacob. “People realize this team has been an underperforming asset. If it improves on the court it will be worth a lot more.” The numbers back him up: Despite comic ineptitude—the team has logged only two winning seasons and one playoff appearance in the past 17 years—the Warriors’ $450 million valuation places them eighth on FORBES’ franchise rankings, up four spots from last year. Some think they could jump even higher. “This could be one of the most valuable teams in the NBA,” says consultant Marc Ganis of SportsCorp. “It’s a great sponsor and TV market.” Forbes.com

While Lacob loves a game, Guber, who makes it up from L.A. only periodically, loves a show. The flamboyant onetime head of Sony Pictures is the creative mind behind turning the Warriors into an entertainment product, especially for the fair-weather fan and especially as the losses pile up yet again (they were 5-9 during this year’s early going). A very young 69, he owns or operates five minor league baseball teams through his company Mandalay Entertainment. To him the people streaming through the turnstiles aren’t fans, customers or guests. They’re the audience. “The experience starts in the parking lot,” he says of the club’s beefed-up customer ser­vice operation, the 191 Wi-Fi spots scattered through the arena and a plan for cashless concession stands. “There’s uncertainty in winning,” he says in a Boston accent, still thick almost 50 years after his departure from his hometown, “but there’s no uncertainty in the experience.” Forbes.com

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