HoopsHype Rudy Gay rumors

April 6, 2014 Updates

Sometimes what seems like the most unlikely of pairings winds up working better than anyone could have imagined. The Sacramento Kings made an aggressive move midseason when they acquired Rudy Gay from the Toronto Raptors, and while the trade has not resulted in a ton of wins in the short-term, there are indications that Gay might be a big part of the Kings’ rebuilding plan going forward. “I have to [keep a positive attitude], man,” Gay told Basketball Insiders. “No matter where I go, I have to be me and be the best me I can be. Honestly, I feel like I do that better here. The wins don’t really pan out like I like for them to, but I definitely feel comfortable here.” Basketball Insiders

As for the decision ahead of him, Gay has been careful not to allow himself to become a distraction for the rest of the team. “Everything is a possibility,” Gay said of his future. “For right now, I just owe it to my teammates to finish the season out to the best of my ability and not comment too much. We have a lot of young guys that probably haven’t been a part of situations like this so I don’t think it’d be fair for me to be steering them one way or the other.” Basketball Insiders

Rudy Gay is a bit distracted these days. Gay’s wife, Ecko, a regular at Kings home games this season, is back in Memphis, Tenn., preparing to give birth to the couple’s first child, a boy. Gay said it’s been tough playing while waiting for news of when his son will be born. “Obviously, you have to separate the two, but when they collide like they are, it does weigh on the back of your mind,” Gay said. “I have a lot of people here that are in my corner and trying to make sure that I’m there.” Sacramento Bee

April 3, 2014 Updates

In February this roster was about one phone call from a controlled demolition, and the call would have carried Lowry away. But the call never came. “[We came] very, very close [to a different path],” says Ujiri, on the phone from Chicago. “I think it was clear for us that after the Rudy Gay trade we were going to see how this whole thing was going to play out … but one thing that really encouraged me was that Kyle, I think Kyle really grew up. We had some honest discussions, and some honest challenges. National Post

April 1, 2014 Updates

So it is possible he trades the $19.3 million for a longer deal now rather than postponing the life decision another season. “Everything’s possible. I work hard. I work very hard. I feel as though when you work hard and you do things the right way, at the end of the day you will be rewarded. Whether it’s taking that year or whether it’s opting out and signing a new contract, I feel like I will be rewarded for my hard work.” Because either outcome is possible. Because he said he has not made a decision. NBA.com

“I think I can have a future here for sure,” Gay says. “For sure. With the people we have in the front office, with the coaches, I definitely fit in here. It’s just when you get here, you’re set and you’re settled and everything’s blown over, when you have your contract and everything’s set, no matter where you are, it’s just where do we go from there? I’m looking forward to weighing my options.” NBA.com

Memphis for 6 ½ seasons, and then suddenly Toronto and Sacramento in a little more than 10 months, and the career intersection over whether to stay in the current contract with $19.3 million on the books for 2014-15 or declare himself a free agent is approaching. In that setting, feeling so undefined about the future is actually understandable. “What does my gut tell me?” Gay says of the looming decision and possibly decisions, plural. “I don’t know. My gut tells me different things every day.” NBA.com

Hollins was against the trade of Gay, an important piece to the Grizzlies’ success. “But I didn’t speak out on the trade,” Hollins contends. “I was asked a question. I said I hated to trade Rudy. We were winning, and it was the best team we’ve had, with him on the floor. With (Pera and Levien), it was economics. I understand small-market economics. Champagne taste, bare budget. They chose to go that way because it saved a lot of money. “If you want to make a decision, be up-front and tell everybody why. That’s fine. But don’t try to say it’s because of a young player’s inefficiency. That’s not why you traded him.” Portland Tribune

“Again, that’s OK,” Hollins says. “But don’t put out there that they got rid of the coach because he doesn’t communicate well, he’s too hard on players, that they want to create a friendly culture. That’s all propaganda. Just say, ‘His numbers were too high for what we wanted to pay.’ “ Hollins is reluctant to speak on the subject. Only with prodding from a reporter he has known since 1977 is he willing to reveal such thoughts. “For a while, it was very hard to accept,” he says. “For a while, I was in a depressed state. When something like that happens, you blame yourself. You wonder what you could have done differently. “At some point, you come to grips with it. It had nothing to do with me. They made that decision because that’s the decision they wanted to make.” Portland Tribune

March 31, 2014 Updates

This summer, the Kings will see how much it costs to keep a trio like that together. Cousins will be entering the first year of a four-year, $62 million contract. Gay has a $19.3 million player option for next season. He could opt out and become a free agent, forcing the Kings to pay a bigger salary to retain him. Sacramento Bee

Gay, 27, is the oldest of the trio and is in what should be the prime years of his career. Whether he opts out or not, he must decide if he wants to spend those years helping Sacramento rebuild or join a team that is closer to making the postseason. “Everything’s a possibility,” Gay said, “but right now I just want to finish the season out and not comment too much.” Sacramento Bee

Thomas has hit playing-time markers that will allow the Kings to make him a restricted free agent. They could negotiate a deal with him that figures to be a significant upgrade from his $884,293 salary or match any offer he receives from another team. Sacramento has more than $47 million in salary committed to next season without Gay’s option. The Kings believe in their short time together the trio has shown it can make up the core of what could become a good team. Sacramento is 19-21 when all three play and 8-3 when the three each score at least 20 points. “We’ve shown the ability to be competitive and beat a lot of the best teams in the NBA when all three of those guys are playing,” coach Michael Malone said. “And when they play at a high level, three 20-point scorers, we become very hard to guard because you have a low-post force (Cousins), a wing with the versatility and athleticism that Rudy has, and a point guard in a Isaiah who can score, get to the foul line and make plays for his teammates.” Sacramento Bee

March 24, 2014 Updates
March 13, 2014 Updates
March 7, 2014 Updates

He’s glad they’re doing well and just as happy to have found his own game and started a turnaround in California. “Change is for the better, for both parties,” Gay said ahead of his return to Toronto. Toronto Sun

To Gay’s credit, he recognizes that while he wasn’t the only problem, his career-low 38.8% shooting and career-worst 3.3 turnovers per game were hurting the Raptors significantly. “I was inefficient when I was here. I’m not anymore. I was when I was here,” Gay said, declining to provide a reason other than “it could have been a lot of things,” as to why his game was so off. Toronto Sun

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