HoopsHype Salary Cap rumors

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May 21, 2015 Updates

A group of (mostly) small-market teams lobbied against the proposal, fearing it would remove their best avenue for acquiring a franchise player right at the moment of a salary-cap explosion that would give glamour-market behemoths unprecedented cap room. No one knows how the new TV deal bonanza will affect the league’s revenue-sharing formula. There was just a sense that too much change was coming at once, and that the changes in the aggregate might favor the top free-agency destinations. I’m not sure that’s the case, but the proposal failed and the league — despite real concern about the perception of tanking — doesn’t appear in a rush to force it down anyone’s throat. Grantland

May 20, 2015 Updates
May 14, 2015 Updates
May 13, 2015 Updates

Because Dwyane Wade said last year that he’s eager to see how much he can command next summer, when the salary cap rises considerably, everyone has expected he would not opt out of a contract that would pay him $16.1 million next season. Opting in seems to make the most sense. But it's curious that Wade was non-committal after the season ended, and his agent this week declined to say if he will opt in. If he surprisingly opted out, he would figure to re-sign here on a multiyear deal, and the Heat thus wouldn’t have cap space (even if Luol Deng also opted out), assuming Goran Dragic stays. (Unless Miami dumps additional salary such as Josh McRoberts or Mario Chalmers.) Miami Herald

May 7, 2015 Updates

Dirk Nowitzki on max contracts in the NBA: "In a way, I understand what the owners want to do. They want to keep it fair for everybody so the big-market teams...like in soccer. Every year it's the same big spenders spending hundreds of millions of Euros over there. It's the same teams always winning the league. I think it's a good approach to have the parity to let everybody have a chance, even though it still might be the same teams. You gotta work within some rules and I actually don't mind it. It's not like I think everyone made enough money, even the superstars. Now with the new CBA coming up in 2017 or whatever, they're already talking about the max money going up to over $30 million. I mean we make more than enough to start complaining...I can see both sides of it. But I don't want to get carried away here. I think the superstars make enough money in our league." Dallas Morning News

May 4, 2015 Updates

The only questions are, how many and how important, and what might they bring back with the possibility of more than $20 million in space under the salary cap. This is what we know: Parker, Tiago Splitter, Boris Diaw, Patty Mills and Kyle Anderson are all on the books for a total of about $34.2 million for 2015-16. San Antonio Express-News

Kawhi Leonard is a mortal lock to return, with a cap hold of roughly $7.2 million until he signs the max contract he’s absolutely going to get even after a poor finish to the Clippers series (29.6 percent from the floor over the last three games, one block and no steals over the last four). (All indications are that Leonard has no interest in signing an offer sheet elsewhere, and wants the security of a full deal over gambling with a one-year qualifying deal in order to hit unrestricted free agency in the summer of 2016, when the cap is projected to skyrocket with the NBA’s incoming TV windfall.) San Antonio Express-News

The Nets can go two different routes, depending on how their salary-cap situation plays out. If they move far enough below the projected “hard cap” of $85 million, they could potentially use the full $5.464 million mid-level exception, the $2.139 million bi-annual exception and be eligible to make sign-and-trades in which they receive a player signing a new contract. However, that would mean the Nets would not be allowed to go above $85 million in spending at any point during the 2015-16 season. New York Post

May 2, 2015 Updates

The power forward told Northeast Ohio Media Group in January that he planned to opt in for next season and enter into free agency in the offseason of 2016. If that's his way of showing his commitment to the organization, there's a more profitable way of doing so. Based on his maximum salary numbers, Love could earn on the upwards of $2.5 million additional for next season if he reversed course and opted out. With the NBA's lucrative television deal kicking in for the 2016-17 season, the salary cap is expected to jump massively, approximately in the ballpark of an $85 million-plus range. Cleveland Plain Dealer

April 30, 2015 Updates
April 26, 2015 Updates
April 23, 2015 Updates

ESPN: In a few years, the salary cap could increase to $100 million. How does that affect the process of putting a roster together? Morey: I think just like every team we got to factor in what the cap in the future is going to do and all our decisions, and obviously those are a little ways away, we’re still focusing on the playoffs. It’s a big part of our planning. The biggest factor with our planning, it’s not only the cap room we have or don’t have, it’s always your cap room or your cap room in relative to others is really what impacts you the most. We do a lot of planning, but right now we’re just focused on the playoffs. ESPN.com

April 20, 2015 Updates

For Aldridge and Gasol, waiting to sign long-term contracts until 2016 could add $50-80 million to the total value of a potential five-year deal under the higher salary cap on the horizon. "If I don't think about it, I don't expect my teammates to think about it," Gasol said. "And if I don't talk about it, I don't expect anybody to talk about it besides you guys [in the media]. It's going to come anyway, just like everything in life. It'll come, and you'll deal with it. You can't worry about things you can't have an impact on just yet because it's just useless." ESPN.com

April 19, 2015 Updates

Stu Jackson is a former NBA head coach and the former executive vice president of the NBA. More recently, he has worked as an analyst on NBA TV. All those jobs make him uniquely qualified to answer a set of questions about the league from the Star Tribune’s Michael Rand: Q There is a lot of talk of “tanking” and teams intentionally losing in the NBA. How much of that do you think is perception and how much is reality? A My view has always been that the perception is greater than the reality with most teams. I think every franchise has reasons why they make certain decisions with their personnel, in terms of managing their salary cap situation to allow for certain trades or free agency, and it really depends on the stage of development respective franchises are in. Those decisions are not the same for everyone. For some it might take on the appearance that a team is tanking when they’re really just managing their own development. Minneapolis Star-Tribune

April 18, 2015 Updates

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