HoopsHype Stu Jackson rumors

March 30, 2013 Updates

Stu Jackson has long overseen basketball operations for the NBA, but he's begun the pursuit of returning to the front office of a team, sources told Yahoo! Sports. The restructuring of the league office could ultimately be dramatic, and those within the NBA are watching closely to understand how it'll eventually trickle down to the product on the floor. Yahoo! Sports

March 20, 2013 Updates
March 14, 2013 Updates

In the eyes of the NBA, a flagrant foul 2 and ejection were enough discipline for Kings center DeMarcus Cousins. Cousins was not suspended for Wednesday's game against the Chicago Bulls. He was thrown out of Sunday's loss to Milwaukee for landing an elbow to the back of Milwaukee forward Mike Dunleavy's head shortly after being called for a technical foul in the third quarter. Kings coach Keith Smart received the news in a conversation with Stu Jackson, the NBA executive vice president of basketball operations. "It wasn't anything that warranted a suspension or anything like that, so he's cleared," Smart said. Sacramento Bee

Smart said he was "not shocked" that Cousins didn't receive his third suspension from the league. "I didn't know," Smart said. "I just stayed neutral. In this case, it was just a very unusual storm because you actually had an injury there as well as the other situation. So the whole focal point was moving forward anyway because you knew he wasn't going to be playing in this game for sure." Sacramento Bee

March 12, 2013 Updates
March 9, 2013 Updates
February 28, 2013 Updates

The NBA issued seven flopping violations in the first month of the 2012-13 season and seven in the second month. There were just three flopping violations in the third month of the season, and there have been zero flopping violations in February. "We feel that the new flopping rule is working well," NBA executive vice president of basketball operations Stu Jackson told USA TODAY Sports. USA Today Sports

January 10, 2013 Updates

NBA disciplinarian Stu Jackson nailed Anthony, who will miss his seventh game and will be docked 1/110th of his $19.5 million salary — $176,000. According to a source, Anthony’s reps are contemplating asking the players association about filing an appeal, but nothing has been decided. New York Post

November 30, 2012 Updates

Back in the Spurs' glory days, it was one disrespectful act after another out of Stern. The Spurs don't forget how the NBA's vice president of operations, Stu Jackson, directly called Bruce Bowen to warn him about how he was playing defense and threaten him with future punishments. Jackson didn't show the respect of reaching out to Spurs officials before communicating with Bowen, but bypassed them and got into the heads of one of their most important players. Phil Jackson himself couldn't have orchestrated it better on behalf of the Lakers' Western Conference championship chances. Yahoo! Sports

No other players were suspended, although Wallace was fined $35,000 and Garnett was fined $25,000. Humphries didn’t receive any additional penalties. Nets general manager Billy King said he had a long conversation with Stu Jackson, the NBA executive vice president of basketball operations, about his decisions in the matter. “We’ll agree to disagree,” King said on a conference call with reporters. “Stu has a tough job at the league and they make decisions that, from the team standpoint, you don’t agree with them. But they have to make tough decisions and so ... I don’t want to share my conversation with him because I don’t think that’s fair. His job is tough. They make decisions, but I’ll agree to disagree with him.” New York Post

November 6, 2012 Updates

Williams made the comments when asked about Hornets forward Anthony Davis, who was injured last Friday night when he was hit in the heat with an elbow from teammate Austin Rivers. "The better he feels in the next couple of days, it helps the situation,'' Williams said before Saturday's game at the United Center. "But when you're dealing with the brain, I guess what's happening in football it's impacted everybody. So he got touched up a little bit last night and I'm sure that happens a lot in basketball. It's just that now you treat everybody like they have on white gloves and pink drawers. It's just getting old, but it's just the way the league is now.'' New Orleans Times-Picayune

October 31, 2012 Updates
October 24, 2012 Updates

The league decided to make the change after the NBA's Competition Committee agreed to the move at its meeting last month, VP of Basketball Operations Stu Jackson said Tuesday evening. "It makes sense," Jackson said. "It made sense to our Competition Committee. Having a center is the only specific position that was singled out on the ballot. It just seemed a little outdated and didn't represent the way our game has evolved. By the same token, it also affords the same opportunity, if you have two good centers in a given year, pick 'em both. They both can be selected. Which is impossible right now." NBA.com

October 4, 2012 Updates

Griffin, though, wasn’t confident that the rule would decrease flopping. “It’s a good way for the NBA to get more money,” he said. Under a new league rule, the NBA will issue warnings, fines and even suspensions to players who flop excessively. “Flops have no place in our game – they either fool referees into calling undeserved fouls or fool fans into thinking the referees missed a foul call,” said Stu Jackson, NBA executive vice president of basketball operations. Orange County Register

October 3, 2012 Updates

"Flops have no place in our game -- they either fool referees into calling undeserved fouls or fool fans into thinking the referees missed a call," said Stu Jackson, executive vice-president, basketball operations in a statement. "Accordingly, both the Board of Governors and the Competition Committee felt strongly that any player who the league determines, following video review, to have committed a flop should -- after a warning -- be given an automatic penalty." USA Today

``I think it’s (anti-flopping rule) good for the game because it’s getting out of hand,’’ Williams said. ``Some of the guys are good at it that it’s hard for the referees to make calls and I think the more you flop, the more you allow the refs to change games and they don’t want to do that. ``I’m not going to name names but there are some guys so good at it that it takes away from the game in my opinion.’’ In a statement, NBA Executive President of Basketball Operations Stu Jackson said flopping has no place in the game. ``They either fool referees into calling undeserved fouls or fool fans into thinking the referees missed a foul call," Jackson said. "Accordingly, both the Board of Governors and the Competition Committee felt strongly that any player who the league determines, following video review, to have committed a flop should – after a warning – be given an automatic penalty.” New Orleans Times-Picayune

June 25, 2012 Updates

NBA executive vice president Stu Jackson told ESPN.com that Sullinger wouldn't be invited based on the reports the league had received that Sullinger wouldn't go in the top 15. "He's more likely to go in the teens or in the 20s," said Jackson. "We continue to have contact with teams but at this late date we don't anticipate inviting him." ESPN.com

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