Barack Obama Rumors

The NBA is set to become the first U.S. professional sports league to visit Cuba since President Barack Obama ordered diplomatic relations between the countries to be restored. The league will hold a four-day development camp and host clinics for youth from April 23-26. Recently retired two-time MVP Steve Nash, newly elected Hall of Famer Dikembe Mutombo, and former WNBA star Ticha Penicheiro will take part, along with NBA coaches Quin Snyder of Utah and James Borrego of Orlando. The league said it will make an official announcement on Tuesday.
Obama and the five Wizards – John Wall, Bradley Beal, Paul Pierce, Kevin Seraphin and Garrett Temple — participated in a shooting game on the White House basketball court with a group of children. Wall came away impressed with the Chicago southpaw. “It was fun. [Obama’s] got the weirdest jump shot release but today he showed off,” the all-star point guard said. “He showed off today. He hit two game-winners so he showed off a little bit today.”
Axelrod stuffs his hands in the pockets of his blazer and walks the short block back to the Institute of Politics. Inside, the floors are covered in the salt stains of a hundred student boots. The institute, which hosts an impressive slate of speakers from both parties, including, in April, Mitt Romney, is something of an ad hoc museum, filled with Axelrod’s collection of American political artifacts. In the front hall is a glass-encased ballot box from the Florida 2000 presidential election. There’s also a napkin signed by JFK, a letter from the newly elected Abraham Lincoln to the Chicago mayor’s son, and a signed poster of Michael Jordan. “When the president turned 50, I wanted to get him something special … so I sent it to Jordan to have him sign it for me.” In black Sharpie, Jordan scrawled, “To Barrack: you still owe me dinner. Wishing you well, Michael Jordan.” “I gave it to the president, and he said, ‘I can’t put this up, he misspelled my name!’ So I said, ‘Fine, I’ll take it.’ ” His own office is a special exhibit dedicated to his time in politics — a program from a State of the Union speech, a ticket to the Nobel Prize ceremony, an invite to Obama’s swearing-in as senator, with the words HERE BECAUSE OF YOU! written in the president’s script.
Basketball was our common ground—something we could talk about that didn’t drain him like his other daily conversations could. Basketball modified the tenor of our interactions and took us from boss and underling to something more like friends. It began with that back-and-forth during the 2007 NBA playoffs. Who was going to be right? The debate went on for years. After Paul, a Los Angeles Clippers guard, won the All-Star Game MVP in 2013, Obama reluctantly conceded, though Parker’s collection of four championship rings with the San Antonio Spurs may make the president’s case for him a little better than mine for Paul. When we started playing basketball on the campaign, Obama’s directive was straightforward: No one takes it easy on me. So we didn’t. We all played full-on, no mercy. This worked great until, after the 2008 election, the president took an elbow from another player that resulted in him getting more than a dozen stitches in the lip.
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The following is an excerpt from the new book “Power Forward: My Presidential Education” by Reggie Love, President Barack Obama’s former personal aide and a member of Duke’s 2001 national-championship basketball team. I’ll never forget the night I got an email from the future president of the United States consisting only of Tony Parker’s stat line. I typed an email back to Barack Obama: “Those are good numbers. But it was against a weak team.” Then I added Chris Paul’s stats.
Obama made note of the international makeup of the Spurs’ roster, which boasts an NBA-record nine foreign-born players, calling them “the U.N. of basketball.” He also praised the Spurs for good deeds done in the San Antonio community, including work with the food bank, literacy programs and veterans groups. Before heading to the White House, the Spurs spent the morning visiting wounded warriors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.
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Obama peppered his remarks with punchlines, making light of 38-year-old captain Tim Duncan’s graying hair, Popovich’s at-times brusque relationship with the media and the coach’s penchant for resting veteran players. “I was thinking about sending the vice president to this event so I could stay fresh for the State of the Union,” Obama joked. “With all due respect,” Popovich retorted, “when I sit stars, I get fined.”
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Obama was asked in a radio interview to respond to Jordan’s recent criticism that the president was a “sh**ty golfer.” “I’ve never played with Obama, but I would,” Jordan told Ahmad Rashad during an appearance on Back9Network. “But, nah, that’s OK. I’ll take him out. He’s a hack. Man, I’d be all day playing with him.” The president was not impressed, saying Jordan “wasn’t very well informed about this.” “There is no doubt that Michael is a better golfer than I am,” Obama told WJMR, a Wisconsin radio station. “Of course if I was playing twice a day for the last 15 years, then that might not be the case.” And later … “He might want to spend more time thinking about the Bobcats — or maybe the Hornets,” the president said. “But that’s a whole other issue.
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President Barack Obama gave coach Gregg Popovich a ring on Friday to laud the Spurs after crushing Miami in the Finals for their fifth NBA championship, the White House announced. This afternoon, the President called San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich to congratulate him on his team’s resounding victory in the NBA Finals. The President praised the selfless teamwork, clear focus, and steadfast determination displayed by the Spurs and noted how impressed he was by the record- setting scoring by the team. The President called Popovich one of the nation’s finest coaches and a role model for young men across the country, and he is looking forward to hosting the team at the White House.
Wary of hangers-on and sycophants, President Barack Obama has made few friends since moving into the White House. Alonzo Mourning, the former Miami Heat star, is a striking exception. He was one of many boldface Democratic donors willing to lend their names to Obama’s first presidential campaign and became a member of a small group of ex-NBA players summoned to play basketball with the president. Over the past few years, though, the president and player-turned-philanthropist developed a deeper bond that challenges the “no new friends” mantra the Obamas developed during the 2008 race.
President Barack Obama is supporting the NBA’s lifetime ban against Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling. That’s according to White House press secretary Jay Carney. Carney said Wednesday that Obama believes the league did the right thing in response to Sterling’s racist comments. Obama had weighed into the controversy over the weekend during a trip to Asia. The president called Sterling’s secretly recorded comments “incredibly offensive racist statements.”
Bleacher Report has learned the form that help will take: a 30-second public service announcement, released in time for March Madness, in which the four-time MVP speaks about the importance of health care coverage. It is similar in style to the television spots featuring former NBA stars Magic Johnson and Alonzo Mourning, each of whom has dealt with a serious health issue—HIV for Johnson and kidney disease for Mourning.
President Barack Obama has called upon LeBron James to come through in the clutch. The president’s signature initiative, the Affordable Care Act, is facing a critical deadline, as open enrollment into the marketplaces on HealthCare.gov is scheduled to end on March 31. In a race to beat the buzzer, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have been enlisting celebrities popular with young adults, including several in sports, to raise awareness and promote the merits of signing up. No current athlete has more clout with that demographic than James, as evidenced by his ability to sell everything from basketball shoes to smartphones. So Obama recently contacted the Miami Heat forward and requested his assistance, offering a number of different ways James could contribute. “Any way I can help the president, that’s pretty cool,” James said Wednesday night.
All-Star Stephen Curry has a fan in President Barack Obama, who offered high praise to the Warriors guard for his shooting ability. “I gotta tell you, Curry is the best shooter I have ever seen,” Obama told TNT’s Charles Barkley in a portion of a taped interview released Friday. “I believe that. “In terms of being able to, you know, off the dribble get his shot off from anywhere that fast, best I’ve ever seen.”
Sixers forward Spencer Hawes, a noted Republican, is not a fan of president Barack Obama. He dislikes the commander in chief so much that he has toilet with Obama’s face on it in his bathroom. How did the world find out about what Hawes uses to wipe his rear end with? Teammate Evan Turner let the cat out of the bag by taking a photo of the toilet paper and posting it on his Instagram account.
The Heat will visit the White House Tuesday afternoon, an invitation to commemorate their second consecutive NBA title, a hard-fought seven-game series against the Spurs. The team also once again will visit wounded warriors at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “It’ll always be a big deal because it’s a part of a championship,” Heat forward Chris Bosh said. “That never gets old. But once you’ve done something before, it’s more routine after that. “But I mean it’s a great honor and a privilege to do it, and I don’t think anybody on this team takes it for granted, because we could ‘not’ be visiting the White House, and you know what that means.”
The White House announced Tuesday that the Miami Heat will make an encore championship appearance with President Obama next Tuesday at 2:45 p.m. Not only will President Obama commemorate the Heat’s 2013 NBA championship, but while at the White House, the Heat will visit wounded warriors from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. The Heat play the Washington Wizards at the Verizon Center the following night.
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As he took care of a few last preparations before Thursday’s trip to meet the president at a White House reception, Rockets forward Omri Casspi admitted to some building nerves. That did not stop him from imagining the game of basketball with President Obama that will not be part of the itinerary. “I wish we had some time to play, too,” Casspi said. “It could have been fun.” Casspi, however, said if they could play, he knew he would not have blocked an Obama shot. “I don’t want any Israel-United States drama, more drama,” Casspi said. “Let him shoot. Let him score. Let him feel good. We need that support.”