David Kahn Rumors

The real problems, though, were much the same as during Garnett’s stay: historically poor management decisions, not enough help on the court and something of an intractable, country-club culture undercutting any player’s or players’ intensity or urgency. Love chafed at the Wolves’ losing, at four head coaches in six years and at former GM David Kahn’s frequently expressed view that Love really wasn’t a franchise player.
Taylor and David Kahn, then president of basketball operations, decided in January 2012 to offer Love a four-year contract extension rather than the five-year maximum “designated player” deal that Love wanted. To convince him to sign, they offered the option of becoming an unrestricted free agent after three years. Taylor was asked if he now considers that decision a big mistake. He paused before answering. “Let’s wait one more year to answer that question,” Taylor said. “I think it’s a good question to ask at this point because Kevin has played as well as we hoped, and maybe even better. To have him tied up long probably would be better than not, but we still have one more year and we’ll see. My hope is it doesn’t make any difference, that Kevin can get the money one way or another and we’re in position to do that.”
So it was on the night of the 2011 lottery, when former Timberwolves general manager David Kahn bristled at the sight of the Cavs’ winning the No. 1 pick (and Duke’s Kyrie Irving). “This league has a habit, and I am just going to say habit,” Kahn told reporters, “of producing some pretty incredible storylines.” Then he pointed to how, the year before, the widow of late Wizards owner Abe Pollin had curiously shown up on the night Washington won No. 1 (and Kentucky’s John Wall). And how, on this night, Cavs owner Dan Gilbert had his 14-year-old son, Nick, who suffers from neurofibromatosis, by his side. When he saw Gilbert’s son, Kahn concluded, “we were done.” Kahn later swore that he was joking, but it was too late: A familiar public message had been sent. The soap opera had started anew. “There have been so many instances of what I would call, as a lawyer, ‘the equity of the situation working itself out,'” Falk tells me, referring to how often ostensibly ideal outcomes become actual ones. “And if you hooked owners up to a lie detector, they would admit to thinking that too.”
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Love also wasn’t much interested in discussing his relationship with former President of Basketball of Operations David Kahn, who was replaced by Flip Saunders last May. “The past is the past and it’s great to have Flip on board,” Love said. “We’ve had great talks. … We all know what happened last year, and we just want to move forward and take care of unfinished business.”
The Wolves hired Kahn as president of basketball operations in May 2009, two years after Kevin McHale drafted Brewer, who played for Randy Wittman, McHale and Kurt Rambis in his three-plus seasons with the Wolves before Kahn traded Brewer as part of a big trade that sent Carmelo Anthony from Denver to New York. Brewer went to New York in the deal and was waived soon after by the Knicks. The Wolves got Anthony Randolph in return. “If McHale drafted you, you were gone,” Brewer said, “unless your name was Kevin Love.”
There’s a good chance Saunders and his staff will make more use of the D-League than the previous front office regime spearheaded by David Kahn. “You have to do it,” Saunders said. “There’s one thing: in that league, those are pros. Those are guys that are borderline pro players, NBA players, so many of those guys, you’ve got to spend money to scout them, because some of those guys are more ready to play than the college guys.”
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The Timberwolves’ relationship with Kevin Love will undoubtedly improve with the ouster of David Kahn, but how will it impact Ricky Rubio? Sources say the Rubio family is disappointed in the decision, largely because Kahn is the one who stuck his neck out and drafted Rubio knowing he couldn’t come over right away and did a lot of the legwork to expedite the start of Rubio’s NBA career. Maybe it blows over — Rubio wouldn’t be the first player who disagreed with a decision yet eventually put it behind him — but it bears watching.
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Eight years after being fired as Timberwolves head coach, Flip Saunders returned to the team Friday morning when he was introduced as the new president for basketball operations. Saunders, 58, replaces David Kahn, who was fired by owner Glen Taylor on Thursday. He received a five-year contract and will also be a limited partner in the team’s ownership group, Taylor said.
Has anything been decided with Rick yet? David Kahn: Not to my knowledge, no. And I think it’s a little premature still. I think people are positioning it as a decision. There’s no doubt in my mind that Rick Adelman wants to come back, hopes to come back and we’re all optimistic he will come back. We’re all similarly hopeful that his wife does not have another medical emergency that would prevent him from doing so.
Did you change your scouting system after not identifying Kenneth Faried in the 2011 draft? David Kahn: Yes. When I arrived, there really was no scouting database to speak of. When I asked list of top 10, top 30, top 40, nobody kept a list. It was kind of unbelievable to me. There was no infrastructure. And second year, one of things that hurt us was Fred Hoiberg, who I kept and I like a lot, ran the scouting but he left for Iowa State in May. We brought Tony Ronzone in, he was intended to supplant Fred. He’d be an additional body to Fred, his own skill set, largely international basketball, USA Basketball and other things. Fred left and we didn’t have somebody leading it those last few weeks heading into that draft. That’s two years in a row where we had change leading into draft period. Going into the 2011 draft, I tried to change system but it just didn’t implemented the way I wanted. We went to a system with scouts watching players play on numerous occasions as opposed to just once or twice, hopefully getting a much more meaningful understanding of their skill sets. We started to require scouts to come to meetings in January and February with clear opinions who should be funneled into a shorter list. We did that this past draft, I just felt I had to take control if we really wanted to make a change. We emphasized regional scouting and cross-checking and put a much more heightened emphasis on analytics and background research.