Donald Sterling Rumors

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He was the target of some of Donald Sterling’s most racist and disgusting comments — but Magic Johnson says he’s forgiven the former Clippers owner … telling TMZ Sports, “I don’t keep grudges.” Not only did Sterling single Johnson out in his racist rant to V. Stiviano and order her not to be seen with Magic or any black people at Clipper games … but he went on to say he’s a terrible role model because he has HIV.
Los Angeles Clippers president and head coach Doc Rivers could be in charge of a very different team if the Donald Sterling regime hadn’t gotten in the way of making moves two years ago. At least that’s what he said in a radio apperance on Tuesday. “This is really only my third year but you can make a case this is our second year if you know what I’m saying,” Rivers told Beast 980’s Fred Roggin. “If I someday wrote a book and told you a couple of the trades we had in the first year that we didn’t do because of other reasons, you would fall off your chair.”
“My family didn’t talk to me for a while, because I was selling the team. They were all against me,” she says over a late-afternoon snack around the small table in their airy, beach-facing kitchen. The Sterling family had owned the Clippers for 30 years. It’s who they were. And in a little over a month, that life was finished. Shelly hasn’t given any interviews in the year since she sold the team to Steve Ballmer for a record $2 billion on May 29, 2014. When people ask to take pictures with her, she politely declines. “That’s not my role,” she explains. “My role is to not be known.”
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But in looking at how she spent this past year, it does seem that she’s been looking for a way forward while preserving the parts of the past she never wanted to let go. “It was very difficult for me to lose the team,” she says. “It was like my family. I’ve seen them [the Clippers] grow for 33 years. The coach [Rivers] used to be our player. And now to see his son [Austin Rivers] play, it’s like part of your family. “I never wanted to sell it, and we never would’ve sold it. But I didn’t want to see it being dismantled. I mean, maybe they wouldn’t even play for the whole year. I didn’t know what the league was going to do. The only thing I knew is that I had to keep the team from being dismantled.”
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The billionaire wife of former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling got her revenge against a woman he secretly showered with gifts and whose recording of his racially offensive rant cost him ownership of the team. Shelly Sterling’s victory Tuesday in Los Angeles Superior Court will force V. Stiviano to surrender a $1.8 million duplex and return $800,000 lavished on her in cash handouts and several luxury cars, including a Ferrari, during a shadowy relationship. Shelly Sterling claimed that Stiviano seduced her 80-year-old husband and manipulated him to give up community property the couple amassed through a real estate rental empire built over six decades of marriage.
The woman who recorded Donald Sterling’s racially offensive remarks says she loved him and called him her hubby, but they never had a romance. V. Stiviano testified Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court in her effort to retain more than $3.5 million the billionaire’s wife says he lavished on Stiviano. Stiviano says she and Sterling vacationed together in Dubai, Paris and Las Vegas, but she never got more intimate than puckering up next to him in photos.
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The woman who recorded Donald Sterling’s racially offensive remarks says she loved him and called him her hubby, but they never had a romance. V. Stiviano testified Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court in her effort to retain more than $3.5 million the billionaire’s wife says he lavished on Stiviano. Stiviano says she and Sterling vacationed together in Dubai, Paris and Las Vegas, but she never got more intimate than puckering up next to him in photos. Stiviano says she hates Shelly Sterling, who she described as the evil witch of the west. Shelly Sterling is seeking money she claims is community property that she and her husband amassed over a 60-year marriage. Stiviano says Sterling bought her cars and helped her buy a house, but she couldn’t provide specific dollar figures.
The inability of the NBA and NBPA to agree on a strategy for incorporating TV money follows other signs of a fraying relationship between league and NBPA leaders. Roberts, for instance, has complained about players being artificially “deflated” by restrictions on salaries while various players have taken critical notice of the Los Angeles Clippers selling for $2 billion and the Atlanta Hawks likely to sell for over $800 million. The rise of Paul and James as NBPA leaders also invites concern that they will prioritize the financial interests of superstars over other players. The NBA, meanwhile, has independently-audited financial records to show a number of teams are losing money. Moreover, the league’s sound business strategy on television and international growth—not to mention NBA commissioner Adam Silver’s adroit handling of the Donald Sterling crisis—appear to have benefited players as much as owners. Despite these achievements, tensions between the NBA and NBPA seem to be rising.
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Former Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling says he could have gotten more than the record $2 billion paid for the team last year but the circumstances of the sale “markedly reduced” the price. The comment was contained in an amended complaint that Sterling’s lawyers filed last week in his lawsuit against the NBA over the sale, the Los Angeles Times reported. The suit seeks at least $600 million in damages.
V. Stiviano, the woman who recorded former L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling making racist remarks was ordered Monday to pay $50,000 in legal fees linked to a failed defamation countersuit against the billionaire’s wife Shelly, his family’s trust and a former Clippers team entity that failed. In November, attorneys for Sterling made a request for the dismissal of Stiviano’s lawsuit, which was granted and allowed parties linked to Sterling to seek the legal fees, CBS Los Angeles reported.
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Your handling of the Sterling problem was almost universally supported. But I’m curious: How much discomfort did you have with the idea of stripping an owner of his franchise for having problematic social views? Were you worried about the precedent this decision would set? Adam Silver: Number one, it all happened so quickly. I heard the tape on Saturday morning, and Donald Sterling had been banned by Tuesday. And I was traveling at the time—I had a pre-planned trip to three NBA cities over that weekend. So in a way, I benefitted from not having time to dwell on the greater societal implications of that decision. But thinking about it now, I am less concerned—precedentially—with the fact that an owner can be removed for his beliefs. I am more concerned with it from a privacy standpoint. I am mindful that this began as a private conversation between Mr. Sterling and a girlfriend. In some ways, this case was made easy for us, because that private conversation—completely unrelated to any acts of the NBA—was made public and widely distributed. So from the NBA’s perspective, I was dealing with a public statement. But that is something I’ve thought about quite a bit. This did not originate as a business conversation. It was not intended for public dissemination. And in fairness to everyone in the NBA, we have to consider the appropriate lines. We’re all entitled to our private thoughts, and even an occasional misstep or misstatement should not be career-ending.
Silas once left for China on a National Basketball Players Association exhibition tour. When he returned, he found that all of his belongings from his office had been moved into a hallway. His office had been given to Patricia Simmons, a former model and Sterling companion whom the boss had hired as an assistant general manager. “That was a trip, man,” Silas said. “She knew nothing about basketball. Then the newspaper guys started writing about her, so she started calling me into her office, trying to get me to explain what offense was, how does shooting go and dribbling and all that. I just said, ‘I can’t talk about this. I can tell you, but you’re just not going to know.’”
During the Donald Sterling situation, did you ever empathize with him? Did you ever think to yourself, “I’ve been in the news more than once for something I’ve said?” Mark Cuban: Did I empathize with him? Yes. Of course I did. This is an elderly man who grew up in a generation that is night-and-day in how it understood race and culture. And yes, I empathized with him because this was a conversation that took place in his kitchen and he had a right to expect privacy in his home. But none of that excused him from the rules of the NBA. He put the business of the NBA at risk. That is a situation that, while I have been fined, I have never found myself in and don’t expect to.
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Addressing reporters before the Hornets-Bucks game, Stern, 72, said his successor, Silver, handled Donald Sterling’s removal as owner of the Los Angeles Clippers “perfectly.” “I have a little bit of a different view of Adam,” Stern said. “I don’t consider him a neophyte. We had been working together for 22 years and the line between what I was doing and what he was doing was not clearly demarcated.”
Donald Sterling has withdrawn his lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court that accused his wife, Shelly, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver and the league of fraud in the sale of the Clippers. The move last week came as Sterling’s federal anti-trust lawsuit against the NBA continues. “We believe that we can more efficiently address all the issues in our pending federal action,” Bobby Samini, one of Sterling’s attorneys, wrote in an email Monday.
Blake Griffin: As Baron is lining up, Sterling started flapping his arms and yelled to no one in particular, “Why are you letting him shoot the free throw? He’s awful! He’s terrible! He’s the worst free throw shooter ever!” Baron had been shooting like 87 percent that season. He was by far our best free throw shooter on the floor. I was standing at half court, right next to Sterling’s seats, watching this out of the corner of my eye, trying not to laugh. I looked at the guys on the other team, like, I cannot believe this is happening right now.
“Everyone, have you met our newest star? This is Blake! He was the number one pick in the entire NBA draft. Number one! Blake, where are you from?” Then I’d say I was from Oklahoma. “Oklahoma! And tell these people what you think about LA.” Then I’d say it was pretty cool. “And what about the women in LA, Blake?” It was the same conversation with every group of people. When he would start having a one-on-one conversation with someone, I’d try to slip away, and he’d reach back and paw my hand without even breaking eye contact with the person. Whenever he didn’t have anything left to say, he just turned around and walked us over to the next group.
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Blake Griffin: I was hoping to escape down the stairs, find one of my teammates and blend in with the rest of the crowd. I tried to pull my hand away. Nope. Things were about to get weirder. Two blonde models showed up on either side of me. They had clearly been hired for the event. I knew this because they were wearing size XXXX-L Clippers T-shirts tied at the stomach. I looked at Sterling. He had a big dumb grin on his face. I looked at one of the girls, as if to say, “Uhhh, you don’t have to do this.” She looked back: “Uhhh, yes I do.” So I walked down the stairs with the two girls arm-in-arm, hoping that was the end of it. That was not the end of it. At the bottom of the stairs, Donald grabbed my hand again. I tried to do the old shake-and-release move. No dice. He kept holding on. “Blake, isn’t this fabulous? I need to introduce you to everyone.”
Blake Griffin: Of course, he tried to spin it that way. After we beat Golden State, Sterling did the infamous interview with Anderson Cooper. Thankfully, commissioner Adam Silver had already taken quick action to ban him from the NBA for life. I was sitting in the trainer’s room getting treatment with Chris Paul during the Oklahoma City series when the interview came on the TV. Sterling looked at Cooper with no irony whatsoever and said, “Ask the players. My players love me!” CP and I looked at one another from across the room and just tried our best not to laugh. We were hoping after Silver’s decision that it was over, but the circus wouldn’t end. The first question I got asked at my locker the next day by a reporter was, “Blake, do you love Donald Sterling?”
Steve Ballmer was pretty excited at the first fan rally after he took over the team. He was jumping around, high-fiving fans, giving us chest bumps. The media and the Internet ran with this. They tried to turn him into a joke. Ballmer was everywhere. People cut up his speech into a montage and put it on YouTube. All the players thought it was awesome. Personally, I love that kind of crazy. Ballmer wants to win no matter the cost. Donald Sterling didn’t care if we won — at least if it meant he had to spend money. It wasn’t just about spending money on players. For years, our training staff wanted to buy this sophisticated computer software that would let them scan our bodies and keep track of our progress throughout the season. Sterling wouldn’t sign off on it.
It was the same conversation with every group of people. When he would start having a one-on-one conversation with someone, I’d try to slip away, and he’d reach back and paw my hand without even breaking eye contact with the person. Whenever he didn’t have anything left to say, he just turned around and walked us over to the next group. “… Have you met our newest star?” It went on like this forever. At one point, a guy who had clearly been to a bunch of these parties turned to me and said, “Just keep smiling, man. It’ll all be over soon.”
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My feeling, right or wrong, was that we should shut it all out and go out and play for our fans, our families, and for each other. For people to ever think we were playing for Donald Sterling is comical. It wasn’t like before the tape came out, we were putting our hands in before every game and saying, “Okay guys, let’s go out and win one for Donald!” Of course, he tried to spin it that way. After we beat Golden State, Sterling did the infamous interview with Anderson Cooper. Thankfully, commissioner Adam Silver had already taken quick action to ban him from the NBA for life. I was sitting in the trainer’s room getting treatment with Chris Paul during the Oklahoma City series when the interview came on the TV.