Ed Snider Rumors

The following is a statement on behalf of the Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Devils from Managing General Partner Josh Harris: “It is with a great deal of sadness that we mourn the loss of one of Philadelphia’s greatest ambassadors and humanitarians, Ed Snider. “Ed continually poured his heart into making a difference in the lives of those around him and he stopped at nothing to make the city of Philadelphia a better place for everyone. He leaves behind a legacy of civic pride, charitable acts and philanthropy that is truly unmatched.
Eagles: Chairman and CEO Jeffrey Lurie offered his thoughts on Snider’s impact in Philadelphia. “Ed was a true visionary and a pioneer who did tremendous things for our city and for the sport of hockey. He was driven by a relentless pursuit of winning and his passion for the sport was genuine. That’s one of the reasons I think he was so loved and respected by the fans of our city and by his players and staff. They knew he cared just as much as they did,” Lurie said.
Ed Snider, who brought hockey to Philadelphia in 1967 as founder of the Flyers, is battling an unspecified cancer and completed chemotherapy this week, according to several sources. “He’s going to work every day and it’s treatable,” a source in the organization said. The condition is “non-life-threatening” and Snider is “doing well,” said Ike Richman, a spokesman for Comcast-Spectacor, the Flyers’ parent company. “He is happy and healthy.”
But Ed Snider, one of the young minority owners of the Philadelphia Eagles, had become a fan of the National Hockey League and had heard that the league was about to expand. Keeping it to himself, so that no one else in the city would bid against him, Snider secured the rights to an expansion team. A big part of Snider’s presentation to the NHL was that the new team would play in a new arena, one that he would get built. But Snider could not even begin to think of building an arena until he had secured a partner, another team that would fill seats at least 30 to 35 times a year. And he had a plum in his own backyard, a 76ers team that would eventually be called the greatest team in the history of the NBA. Former Philadelphia Warriors owner Eddie Gottlieb, one of the all-time great movers and shakers in the history of the NBA, knew Snider needed help. “Eddie Gottlieb often told me in conversation that before that building can make money,” recalled super statman Harvey Pollack, who served as a publicist under Gottlieb with the Warriors, “they have to have 150 dates in which the building is used during the course of a year.”