Ed Snider Rumors

Ed Snider, who brought hockey to Philadelphia in 1967 as founder of the Flyers, is battling an unspecified cancer and completed chemotherapy this week, according to several sources. “He’s going to work every day and it’s treatable,” a source in the organization said. The condition is “non-life-threatening” and Snider is “doing well,” said Ike Richman, a spokesman for Comcast-Spectacor, the Flyers’ parent company. “He is happy and healthy.”
via Philadelphia Inquirer
But Ed Snider, one of the young minority owners of the Philadelphia Eagles, had become a fan of the National Hockey League and had heard that the league was about to expand. Keeping it to himself, so that no one else in the city would bid against him, Snider secured the rights to an expansion team. A big part of Snider’s presentation to the NHL was that the new team would play in a new arena, one that he would get built. But Snider could not even begin to think of building an arena until he had secured a partner, another team that would fill seats at least 30 to 35 times a year. And he had a plum in his own backyard, a 76ers team that would eventually be called the greatest team in the history of the NBA. Former Philadelphia Warriors owner Eddie Gottlieb, one of the all-time great movers and shakers in the history of the NBA, knew Snider needed help. “Eddie Gottlieb often told me in conversation that before that building can make money,” recalled super statman Harvey Pollack, who served as a publicist under Gottlieb with the Warriors, “they have to have 150 dates in which the building is used during the course of a year.”
via Philadelphia Inquirer
After the Sixers won the championship, Pollack said, “the 76ers were in a strong position to negotiate about coming [to the Spectrum]. Kosloff swung a sweetheart of a deal every year it was in effect. “That’s how they got [Kosloff] to come here, or else there wouldn’t have been the Flyers. I don’t think they would have gone ahead and built the building if it was only the Flyers.” So, the deal was struck, and the Sixers made the big move into the state-of-the-art Spectrum.
via Philadelphia Inquirer
In the complaint, Shine claims he introduced Levien and other potential buyers to Comcast-Spectacor Chairman Ed Snider in November and December 2010. Levien was identified as a potential buyer in a written agreement between the company, Shine and Whitsitt in January, according to the complaint. Ike Richman, a spokesman for Philadelphia-based Comcast- Spectacor, didn’t immediately respond to an e-mail seeking comment on the lawsuit.
via BusinessWeek.com
By the end of the month, Comcast-Spectactor should be out of the basketball business when the NBA is expected to approve the sale of the team to buyout specialist Joshua Harris. Snider inherited one of the worst teams in the league in 1996 and had the Sixers in the NBA finals in 2001. The Sixers were mired in mediocrity for most of the last decade, and sagging crowds and massive financial losses led Comcast-Spectactor to pitch a “for sale” sign and strike a tentative deal to sell in July. “It was mostly economics,” Snider said of the decision. Losing money? “A lot,” Snider said, declining specifics. “We felt that we had given it our best shot and it was time for someone else to take over.”
via MSNBC.com