Larry Brown Rumors

Allen Iverson: I'm a basketball genius

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The Inquirer reported Tuesday that former coach Larry Brown has been lobbying the 76ers to hire Allen Iverson as an assistant general manager. There is one person who wholeheartedly supports that move: Iverson himself. “I may not know everything about physical talent or anything like that, but I have a sharp mind when it comes to that look, being able to look into somebody’s eyes to tell if they are going to be in the foxhole with you tonight or if they are not,” Iverson said Thursday night. “To me, I am a basketball genius and I really believe that, so at any capacity I could help this franchise, that is what I am going to do, whatever they ask me to do.”
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Yesterday, it came to our attention that Larry Brown vehemently denied having said Iverson had been drinking before the news conference, a point brought up by Kent Babb, author of the Iverson bio, “Not a Game: The Incredible Rise and Unthinkable Fall of Allen Iverson,” during his appearance on the Innes and Bruno Show on 94WIP last week. “I said the wrong thing on the radio show last Thursday,” Babb said via email, “and that’s what got back to Larry. I told them that I had first heard about it from Larry Brown [Brown acknowledged to Babb that he said Iverson went to Houlihan’s at City Avenue and Presidential Boulevard before the presser], which is true, but I went on to say that Brown mentioned red eyes and slurring. That actually came from other people; I mistakenly attributed that in the radio appearance to Brown. That was a mistake on my part. I should’ve reacquainted myself with that chapter and who said precisely what before doing the interview.”
The Knicks, Lakers and 76ers are among the NBA’s worst teams, and Brown likes the idea of Mudiay landing in a big market like New York, Los Angeles or Philadelphia, all cities where he used to coach. “I want to help the kid and I look at the possibilities with L.A, the Knicks, with Philadelphia, there’s some unbelievable major markets with the chance to really make a difference,” Brown said. “I’m just hopeful that he’s around quality people because he’s an extraordinary kid in my mind and an unbelievable talent at a position you can’t put enough emphasis on.”
“I think when Deron Williams was healthy and young [they were similar],” Brown said. “He shot the ball better than Emmanuel but Emmanuel’s shot is not broken. If you’re conscientious, you can become a reasonable shooter if you’re shot’s not broken and his shot is not broken. But he doesn’t need to shoot to be effective because I think he’s pass-first. I think he’s a special defender and I think he’s an elite rebounder.”
Brown reportedly feuded with Stephon Marbury a lot that season, but Brown said that wasn’t quite accurate. “Let me explain something to you,” he said. “Marbury was not our problem. That’s not fair. Isiah (Thomas) and Marbury were a problem because Marbury and Isiah were connected at the hip, and there was no chance for Stephon to be able to play for me. But he was a good kid and had really no chance (of) being successful the way the dynamics worked out. A coach needs to be able to coach a team and needs the president, the owner, the GM – everybody – to be on the same page. Jim Dolan gave me every chance to be successful, but we didn’t have any unity in the way that program was run. And as a result, it struggled. “If you look at the great NBA franchises,” Brown continued, “everybody that’s successful, they’re all connected at the hip. So I feel bad that I wasn’t able to help that franchise move forward. I’m hopeful that it will now that Phil’s running everything. That’s a chapter in my life that I don’t look back on anymore because I know I didn’t have a chance to be successful.”
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“I don’t get analytics, I never will,” he said The Sixers are heavily involved in using analytics. “I have been doing analytics since I was 12 years old, try to get fouled, try to get great shots and try to limit people from getting good shots,” Browns said. “I don’t buy this mid range jump shot is not a good shot.” He understands why analytics have become a big part of the game. “New owners made their money on information so you can sound awful smart throwing a lot of information at people,” he said. “But inside, you know who can play and who can’t.”
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Van Gundy, after practice today here, said he appreciated the opportunity to discuss the 3-19 Pistons’ issues with the last coach to win a championship here. Brown, now head coach at Southern Methodist University, was coach of the 2004 Pistons. Van Gundy said he called Brown about a week ago. “I’ve talked to Stan,” Brown said on Frank Isola’s and Mitch Lawrence’s morning show. “He reached out to me a while ago. I admire him. I think he’s a hell of a coach. I told him, ‘Look, you’re the coach, general manager, president, all the people on your staff love you and care about you. You’ve had success before. Just do what you do.’ It’s a process.”
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“I hate what’s going on in Philly,” he told The Philadelphia Inquirer. “They don’t have a basketball person in the organization. It makes me sick to my stomach.” In an email, N.B.A. Commissioner Adam Silver dismissed Brown’s nausea, saying: “First of all, no team goes on the court trying to lose games. What’s sometimes labeled tanking in our league is, in my view, more accurately described as rebuilding. Unfortunately, rebuilding a team is not easy in any league and takes time and careful planning.”
An organizational reliance on analytics is something that especially drew Brown’s ire. “I hate what’s going on in Philly,” Brown told the Philadelphia Inquirer on Wednesday. “They don’t have a basketball person in the organization. It makes me sick to my stomach. “These analytics, they don’t mean squat to me. Throw it up against the wall and see if it sticks. To say that these analytics guys have the answer is crazy. It doesn’t apply to basketball. Everybody uses the data you get, but that’s what coaching is. Maybe it will work, I don’t know. But it’s a shame what those fans are going through waiting to see if it will.”
“Can you imagine telling Allen Iverson that this is a rebuilding season so we’re going to be bad on purpose?” Brown asked. “I love [Nerlens] Noel, I love Joel [Embiid]. But you can’t put that stuff into them. Again, it boggles my mind. I understand you have to get assets to get better. You get assets by developing young players, draft picks, and moving contracts. But how much teaching is going on? “What they are doing to that city to me is mind-boggling. That’s the greatest basketball city in the world with its fans and you want them to sit back and watch you lose.”
Buford talked about the future of the Spurs without Tim Duncan and Gregg Popovich, although they are likely to stay together at least one more season. Buford, a former assistant coach under Larry Brown and lead scout, is preparing for life after Duncan and Popovich — whenever that comes. “The Spurs Way has been different over the course of time,” Buford said. “It’s been built to fit the strengths of our teams. [Popovich and I] grew up under Coach Brown, and Larry thinks there’s a wino on the street with a perfect out-of-bounds play. He’ll listen to anybody. And I think we grew up under that burden.”
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As for the idea that Brown may be leaving SMU anytime soon, he said he’s happy where he is. Beyond the fact that his Mustangs team went from 15-17 in his first season to 27-10 in 2013-14, he’s enjoying the unique chance to be near his son, L.J, who just finished his freshman year at SMU. “I’m just so thankful SMU gave me this chance,” Brown said. “We have made such progress. We’ve got a bunch of young kids already committed for the future and I’d love to finish it out here. … I’d love to see (the Lakers) get a great coach, because I love Mitch and I love that franchise. But I’m thrilled where I am. I feel so fortunate I’ve had this chance.”
As for the idea that Brown may be leaving SMU anytime soon, he said he’s happy where he is. Beyond the fact that his Mustangs team went from 15-17 in his first season to 27-10 in 2013-14, he’s enjoying the unique chance to be near his son, L.J, who just finished his freshman year at SMU. “I’m just so thankful SMU gave me this chance,” Brown said. “We have made such progress. We’ve got a bunch of young kids already committed for the future and I’d love to finish it out here. … I’d love to see (the Lakers) get a great coach, because I love Mitch and I love that franchise. But I’m thrilled where I am. I feel so fortunate I’ve had this chance.”