Lionel Hollins Rumors

Growing up, Hollins had no suits in his closet. So when he donated his own 10 fine suits to Men’s Wearhouse, the chain hosting the campaign, it was personal. The brand is aiming to collect 250,000 items of men’s and women’s gently used professional clothing to help unemployed workers dress sharply and ace job interviews. “I was fortunate to go to college and make it to the NBA,” Hollins told John Aidan Byrne. “I don’t need these suits anymore, but somebody does. I am inspired by the Bible verse, ‘To whom much is given, much more is required.’ ”
Lionel Hollins said Kaminsky’s versatility also serves him well, noting how Kaminsky has the abilities to play center and power forward. “I think he’ll be a little of both, a four and a five,’’ Hollins said. “He’s probably going to be a little bit like Pau Gasol (of the Chicago Bulls), where he’s more of a four than a five. But against the right teams, he’ll be able to play five. Having a big guy who can step out and make shots opens the court for your other guys to penetrate and post up. And, when you’re in pick-and-rolls, he can create problems. You can run pick-and-rolls with the other bigs and he can either pop or roll. I think Kaminsky’s game certainly translates well to our game. Now it’s a matter of how much will he has and toughness he has to deal with the grind that is the NBA.’’
Like Bogdanovic, Karasev admitted to a somewhat uneasy relationship with Lionel Hollins, but one that he saw, in the end, as mutually respectful. “Actually I wouldn’t call his relationship with any player straight-forward, because he tailors his coaching approach to each individual. He plays his cards close to his chest but he’s a top class professional. He has a great feel for the game, and if you give him your all during each practice and every time you play, it does not go unnoticed – He will always tell you that you’re doing a good job and to keep up he good work. I think I have a pretty good relationship with him. He has come up to me, given some tips and advice and told me what I need to work on. I hope next year I can prove that I can play under his leadership.”
A day after the Brooklyn Nets were eliminated from the playoffs, head coach Lionel Hollins admitted point guard Deron Williams is no longer a franchise player. “He’s not a franchise player anymore,” Hollins said on Saturday morning during break-up day. “He’s a good player, he’s a solid player, but I don’t think he’s a franchise player anymore. That’s just my opinion. He’s a good player. I’m proud of the way he’s bounced back and played, and there’s so much pressure on him to be a franchise player, and everybody talks about a franchise player, but we need to have a franchise team.
“I don’t think Lionel’s going anywhere, so that’s definitely reassuring,” Williams said. “You never know what’s gonna happen in the offseason, but it’s good to know you’re gonna have the same coach, and if we keep most of our guys, we’ll have something to build on for once. We’ve had the same core, but we’ve [been semi-] healthy and [rarely] played together under the same system, so hopefully we can build on things.”
An unprompted Lionel Hollins took it to another level following Sunday’s film session, reprimanding the media with an underlying message: Tone down the expectations because Williams isn’t the same player once trumpeted by the Nets as the best point guard in the NBA. “That’s four years ago. We’re now. No player is the way he was four years ago,” the Nets coach said. “All I’m saying is now is that the guy is playing well. Somebody picks out that he has two points (in Game 2 against the Hawks). So what? He played well. It’s not just about the scoring. “If it was just about the scoring, there’s a lot of teams that would be better because they have guys who score a lot of points. But it’s about winning. It’s about doing the right things for the team. And I’ll defend Deron until the end on that and all my players to the end if you think that just because a guy makes a lot of money and is supposed on a level because everybody put him on that level — whether it be the organization, or whomever — it’s still where we are now. And we have to deal with now. And I support him 100 percent.”
Simply put, Hollins isn’t too concerned with stopping Kyle Korver. “How many shots did he take yesterday and how many did he miss? See, if he’s that good, he’d make all of them.” Hollins said. “Everybody misses, man. He’s a good shooter, I acknowledge that, we acknowledge that as a team, we game plan for him because he is a great shooter. But until he starts shooting 100%, we’ve got to play and be in position to help, and then recover, and close out. “It’s not like we’re talking (Stephen) Curry. Korver, he’s a great come-off-the-screen guy, he’s great with moving without the ball, but he rarely puts the ball on the floor like Curry and shakes you up.”
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There’s a worry that the comments, which come on the heels of Brooklyn’s final game of the season in a tight playoff race, could distract the team in a high-pressure situation. But while Johnson and Williams declined to speak with the media prior to the game, Nets coach Lionel Hollins said the comments didn’t faze him. “I don’t really care (about the comments),” Hollins said during his normal media availability before the Nets took on the Orlando Magic. “I wasn’t here. I don’t care. All I can go by is how we are this year, and as I’ve said many many times, the vocal leader of our team early on was (Kevin Garnett), and since he’s left it’s been more of a collective.”
Lionel Hollins on what he saw in Markel Brown and when he saw it… “He brought a certain quickness and athleticism that we didnt have on the team, so you noticed it at practice, but consistency is something young players have to develop and he and Cory Jefferson are probably our two most athletic kids on the court. Just before we got to the point (where he started), Markel was really, really consistent every day at practice. Every time I watched him, he was showing something that said, ‘I need a chance.’
Here’s some selected quotes from the 17-minute interview. Lionel Hollins on Deron Williams improvement… “I think the trade for Thaddeus young gives us a little more versatility, a little more quickness and putting Markel Brown in the starting lineup has contributed to us playing at a different pace, especially early. And Deron is a good high-pace player. He likes to push the ball, he likes to probe, to explore early. I think with the added quickness around him, he’s been able to do that and we’ve been able to be effective with that. But everything comes with health and Deron has had his turn with nagging injuries this year as well as last couple of year.
When pressed further about his role in the team’s decision-making process, Hollins grew exasperated. “I just said I want him back. How many damn times do I have to say that? Damn.” Hollins then turned to each individual reporter, repeating the mantra: “I want him back. I want him back. I want him back. Okay, everybody got it? I want him back. I want him back. But it’s still his call.”
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Lionel Hollins has been at odds with Brook Lopez at times this season. But that doesn’t mean he wants a breakup. “I don’t worry about whether he’s going to be a free agent, whether he’s going to be back, or anything like that,” Hollins said. “Obviously I’d like for him to be back. I hope he’s going to be back. But those decisions are not mine, and I don’t worry about it.”