Masai Ujiri Rumors

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The NBA trade deadline is approaching. The college basketball season is nearing the point where draft prospects will flourish or wilt under the pressure to perform. Around the globe, from Lagos to Liverpool, there is always a game available to analyze. There is no option, Ujiri has long understood, but to pack up and move onto the next destination. “There is plenty to juggle,” he said. “You have to figure it out. There is so much, with college, with trade deadlines, all the information you’re gathering. There’s managing your team, your coaches, everything. There’s a lot in the NBA these days but that’s your job. We get paid to do it and we have to figure it out. I was on a five-day scouting trip and then came home and went over on this. Then in a week or so I’m going back to Europe to scout. It’s a difficult part of a job. But you have to figure it out. Because everybody’s trying to win.”
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It was very easy then, to make signing Carroll their off-season priority, and in very short order the deal got done. Raptors president and general manager Masai Ujiri met with Carroll and his wife shortly after the free agency period opened made a strong initial offer and said that it would be taken off the table when the meeting was over. Carroll didn’t hesitate. For the price of $60-million over four years the one-time fringe NBAer who found a niche for himself as an elite three-point threat with multi-position defensive chops was a Raptor.
“He’s not gone anywhere, and that’s what I am trying to preach,” said Toronto Raptors GM Masai Ujiri. Gone but not forgotten was the sentiment of the second annual Nelson Mandela night held by Ujiri and his not-for-profit organization “Giants of Africa” at the Air Canada Centre where the Raptors took on and lost to the undefeated Golden State Warriors. The event celebrated Mandela’s life, legacy and ability to inspire change especially through the use of sport to unite the world.