Peter Holt Rumors

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For the record, furthermore, don’t forget that Popovich only just completed the first season of a five-year contract. Word is he contemplated retirement after last season’s championship with more seriousness than any of us on the outside realized, but Pop didn’t just agree to keep coaching. He consented to sign that long-term deal which, according to industry insiders, pays in the $11 million range annually. The reflex reaction to news of Pop’s five-year contract was to conclude that it was somewhat ceremonial, based on the idea that no one in South Texas really expects to see out all five of those years on the bench. Yet we can share that there’s at least one pretty well-connected Spurs watcher we know who thinks Pop just may surprise us. And his name is Peter Holt.
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Peter Holt: Remember, I’ve only had one losing year and that was my first year, 1996-97, which now I’m glad happened and not just because we got Tim. I didn’t know we were going to get Tim. We were third (worst record), not first. But it helped me understand how difficult this business is. It really did. I mean, the year before we had been in the Western Conference finals and we had David. I thought everything was going to be peachy keen and we went 20-62. The kids that summer, my wife and I told them we were buying into the Spurs and they were all excited because we all loved the Spurs and had season tickets and went all the time. By the end of the season, they said, “Dad, can we sell the Spurs? Everybody on the playground at school thinks you’re an idiot.” That’s a true story. Everybody thought I’d screwed it up.
The smile that spread broadly across Holt’s face and the hearty chuckle that spilled from it revealed his satisfaction in doing so. Holt, basking in the immediate glow of his team’s fifth championship Sunday night, was asked if this title is the sweetest of them all. Holt said, yes it is, although the first in 1999 will always be special, and that’s when you could start to see Holt’s face light up and the smile begin to build… “Even though it was a shortened, asterisked season,” Holt said, now sporting a full-on grin. “Phil, Phil, Phil, Phil, we all played the same amount of playoff games, didn’t we, Phil?”
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During the presentation of the Larry O’Brien trophy, the under-the-radar owner in typical fashion quickly turned the spotlight away from himself to coach Gregg Popovich and general manager R.C. Buford. “They say that success starts at the top,” ABC’s Stuart Scott said to Holt. “If that’s the truth, what’s your secret?” “My secret,” Holt said, “is these guys behind me: coach Pop and R.C. Buford. That’s my secret. It doesn’t start at the top; it starts with them.”
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But teammate Tony Parker and Spurs chairman Peter Holt both expect that Duncan and Manu Ginobili — who has already said definitively he’ll be back for the last season of his current two-year deal — will return to help the Spurs defend their title. “It will come to an end but I don’t think next year,” Parker said. “I think everybody’s gonna come back.” Holt said, “Tim and Manu are going to play until they die, so I think we are in pretty good shape. Tim and Manu want to play until they die, somewhat sincerely, actually.”
Spurs chairman and CEO Peter Holt took a cautious tone in addressing racist comments attributed recently to Clippers owner Donald T. Sterling. The comments alleged to have been made by Sterling were obtained by TMZ, who allegedly told a companion not to appear in Instagram photos with former Lakers great Magic Johnson “and don’t bring him to my games.” The NBA is investigating the comments. “I want to be very careful,” Holt said. “The league is doing its own investigation and I don’t want to jump the gun. I don’t know the context, but from what I’ve heard it sounds bad and it isn’t like this is the first go-around for him.”
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The 12 owners on the NBA’s relocation/finance committee will make the recommendation on the future of the Kings: • Peter Holt, Spurs (chairman of the board of governors) • Micky Arison, Heat • Clay Bennett, Thunder • Jeanie Buss, Lakers • James Dolan, Knicks • Wyc Grousbeck, Celtics • Ted Leonsis, Wizards • Greg Miller, Jazz • Robert Sarver, Suns • Herb Simon, Pacers • Larry Tanenbaum, Raptors • Glen Taylor, Timberwolves
San Antonio Spurs CEO Peter Holt is the new BOG chairman, taking over for Minnesota owner Glen Taylor, who had served in that role since 2008. “We are being nice to David, but I want to be extra nice to Glen,” Holt said. “This has gone really smoothly. Glen has stayed in the chairmanship much longer than normal to allow the continuity to be smooth from obviously David to Adam, but also throughout the ownership group. So I want to thank Glen for that.” A discussion on accepting ads in the form of jersey patches as another revenue stream was pushed to the BOG’s next meeting.
Spurs owner Peter Holt, chairman of the owners’ labor relations committee, also was in New York for Friday’s settlement conference on the 148th day of the lockout, as was former union president Derek Fisher, sources told CBSSports.com. Tempestuous players attorney Jeffrey Kessler will not be present. While Kessler still is “very much involved,” according to a source, he no longer has the role of lead negotiator for the players and has been replaced in that capacity by Quinn, a voice of reason with a long history of deal-making with key figures and attorneys on both sides of the dispute.
Another 12 hours of talks are in the books, and the push to get this mess past the finish line endures. ”I don’t want to talk about our current state of mind or where we are,” said Stern, who was joined in the negotiating session by just one owner, Peter Holt of the San Antonio Spurs (the chairman of the owners’ labor relations committee.) “At the end of the negotiating session, whether it ends today or tomorrow, that’s when our offer reverts. We trying to demonstrate our good faith, and I think the union is trying to show its good faith,” Stern said. “Every day that we lose another game it just enhances the case to make a deal and causes both sides to try to make a deal. We’re here, the clock is stopped, and we’re trying to see if we can get something to go back to our respective sides with.