Steve Clifford Rumors

For Charlotte’s Steve Clifford, the ability in the final two minutes of a game to advance the ball without requiring a timeout to be called could speed up the action. That has been used on a trial basis in the D League and in Summer League, and several coaches felt it worked well. “The game is at an all-time high in popularity, but a lot of people complain about the last two minutes,” Clifford said. “I think it would add a different dimension but it would also be a good thing in addressing our biggest issue.”
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For Charlotte’s Steve Clifford, the ability in the final two minutes of a game to advance the ball without requiring a timeout to be called could speed up the action. That has been used on a trial basis in the D League and in Summer League, and several coaches felt it worked well. “The game is at an all-time high in popularity, but a lot of people complain about the last two minutes,” Clifford said. “I think it would add a different dimension but it would also be a good thing in addressing our biggest issue.” Not that the coaches would be willing to lose any of their timeouts, though. They just wouldn’t save them specifically for that purpose.
“We probably don’t have as many points in our lineup,” Clifford said at a media luncheon Tuesday. “We lost a lot of offense, but I think we’ll figure that out. We have potential to be better defensively. We get Mike (Kidd-Gilchrist) back and he’s an elite perimeter defender. “In studying Roy (Hibbert), it’s just a question of helping him get back to the level he once played at. He’s a basket-protector, but he can also play offense. If he gets anywhere near what he was at Indiana, he gives us a dimension we haven’t had.”
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“We probably don’t have as many points in our lineup,” Clifford said at a media luncheon Tuesday. “We lost a lot of offense, but I think we’ll figure that out. We have potential to be better defensively. We get Mike (Kidd-Gilchrist) back and he’s an elite perimeter defender. “In studying Roy (Hibbert), it’s just a question of helping him get back to the level he once played at. He’s a basket-protector, but he can also play offense. If he gets anywhere near what he was at Indiana, he gives us a dimension we haven’t had.”
Clifford indicated Lin would be the toughest to replace because of his versatility to defend both point guards and shooting guards. “We were ninth in offense and ninth in defense. We knew we had better offensive personnel. We were one of only four teams to be top-10 in both,” Clifford said. “The thing that stood out more than anything was depth. “When we had two (healthy) rotation players at every position, that’s when we were really good in terms of efficiency of play.”
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Nick Friedell: As somebody who has been around the game as long as you have, who is the most prepared player you’ve come across in your time? Steve Clifford: Kobe. Kobe watched film on every opponent. Because being such a prolific scorer for such a long period of time, he knew that within most games [other teams] were going to try defend him more than one way. He watched film on every team — how they defended him the last time we played them. So he was, to me, as prepared as you could be, or maybe even a step ahead in all situations.