Avery Bradley Rumors

All NBA Players
#11
Avery Bradley
Avery Bradley
Position: G
Born: 11/26/90
Height: 6-3 / 1.91
Weight:195 lbs. / 88.5 kg.
Salary: $6,767,000
The Los Angeles Lakers plan to reward guard Avery Bradley, who opted out of the NBA’s restart, with a championship ring this season if the franchise is able to capture its 17th NBA title. “Yes, [Lakers general manager] Rob Pelinka made me aware of the Lakers offering me a ring if they win the championship,” Bradley told Yahoo Sports via phone Tuesday afternoon. “It’s a very kind gesture on their part.”
Even though the Lakers officially signed veteran guard J.R. Smith on Wednesday, Caruso said he’ll be ready to fill any void when called upon. He averaged 5.4 points and 2.1 assists in 58 games. He shot 35.5% from the three-point range, 49.6% from the field and displayed an all-around skill set that included solid defense. “I’m not sure if I’m going to be the sole provider of everything that Avery did,” Caruso said. “That’s a lot to ask for just because of how good he is at what he does. But I’m definitely going to be ready to fill part of that gap and that need.”
Free-agent guard JR Smith, out of the NBA for two years, has emerged as a leading candidate to replace Avery Bradley on the Los Angeles Lakers’ roster for the season’s Orlando restart, sources told ESPN. Lakers president of basketball operations Rob Pelinka and Smith’s agent, Rich Paul of Klutch Sports, were discussing a possible agreement Tuesday night and were expected to speak again Wednesday, sources said.
Storyline: JR Smith Free Agency
“I think it’s just important that we’re together,” Green said. “Obviously we’re going to need Avery Bradley, we’re going to need Dwight Howard to be playing for us to have a chance. But I think it’s important we stay healthy, and not just our team but the league. Everybody that’s in the league has to have a unified front on what we’re going to do and speak with one voice. But for our team individually, as a group, [the] Lakers, we need to be together, we need to be on the same page, we’ve got to stay healthy. I think we have some professional guys that are on top of it and staying in shape during this time. I think we’ll be a little ahead of the curve with that.
Two of the three players who have been most vocal about the possibility of declining participating in the NBA’s attempt to restart its season inside a bubble next month are Avery Bradley and Dwight Howard — both members of the Los Angeles Lakers. And while their teammate, Danny Green, appreciates and supports the position both of them have taken, it is his belief that players will be able to create more change by going into the bubble and playing than by choosing to stay away.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
“I think we can use the platform to our advantage and enhance it,” Green said in an interview with Caron Butler on the NBA’s Twitter account in honor of Juneteenth. “I mean, I see both sides. But I think we can easily, and I think [with] social media and all the platforms we have and people watching us they’re going to be tuning in even more when we’re down there.”
“Like Avery Bradley, he’s one of the guys who has spoken out, but he doesn’t really have social media, so [people] don’t really know how he feels, they’re not really able to see and hear it from him,” Green said. “But if he goes down to Orlando he’s going to have to do interviews. He’s going to have a hell of a game one of these nights or a hell of a quarter, and he’s going to have to talk to the media. Even if he doesn’t have a hell of a game, he’s still going to have to talk to the media. So after the game they actually hear from his voice, from his mouth himself how he feels about the protests, about the social injustice, about the movement. For guys that don’t have social media, or guys that don’t have a big following, it’s a better way for everybody to be there and be united.”
Some players, including Brooklyn’s Kyrie Irving and Los Angeles Lakers guard Avery Bradley, have discussed the possibility of boycotting the restart of the 2019-20 NBA season. “I never wanted to be put in a box on the court (as a pure point guard) or off the court (as being recognized solely as an athlete),” Thomas says. “So when I look at players today, I say they are sons and daughters, they are mothers and fathers, they are citizens, and then they are athletes. So they have multitudes. We can be citizens and we can also be athletes, and you don’t have to be one or the other. You can be both and there’s a movement that’s going on in this country. What society has said is that systemic racism at all levels is bigger than sports. It’s bigger than the game. Because right now it’s about getting America right. And our sports personalities are speaking to getting America right. These are the young people right now that truly have a chance to change the world forever.”
Irving and Bradley, two of a number of veteran players who’ve taken expanded roles in organizing player conference calls in the past week, believe they’re providing a voice for those players fearing retribution if they openly voice their concerns, sources tell ESPN. Irving, Bradley and the coalition of players want to pursue some concerns further with the league, sources said, including: the investment of resources and ideas of all league constituencies — from the commissioner’s office, ownership level, management and players association — in social justice reform.
In a statement to ESPN shared by leaders of the coalition of players, the group described themselves as a movement working to unite NBA players — and those well beyond the limits of the league’s structure. “We are a group of men and women from different teams and industries that are normally painted as opponents, but have put our egos and differences aside to make sure we stand united and demand honesty during this uncertain time,” the coalition said. “Native indigenous African Caribbean men and women entertaining the world, we will continue to use our voices and platforms for positive change and truth. We are truly at an inflection point in history where as a collective community, we can band together — UNIFY — and move as one. We need all our people with us and we will stand together in solidarity. As an oppressed community we are going on 500-plus years of being systemically targeted, used for our IP/Talent, and also still being killed by the very people that are supposed to ‘protect and serve’ us. WE HAVE HAD ENOUGH!”
After Friday’s NBA players’ group call revealed just how adamant a faction of the league is against resuming the season in Orlando, Florida, next month, members of the Los Angeles Lakers insist that ample time remains to get their team on the same page. “[There’s] no divide,” one Lakers player told ESPN. “Still have some time to figure things out as a league and as a team,” another Lakers player told ESPN. Among the dissenting voices on the call that featured nearly 100 players were Lakers backup center Dwight Howard and starting shooting guard Avery Bradley, sources told ESPN. Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving was a driving influence on the call.
Storyline: Season Resuming?
After Friday’s NBA players’ group call revealed just how adamant a faction of the league is against resuming the season in Orlando, Florida, next month, members of the Los Angeles Lakers insist that ample time remains to get their team on the same page. “[There’s] no divide,” one Lakers player told ESPN. “Still have some time to figure things out as a league and as a team,” another Lakers player told ESPN. Among the dissenting voices on the call that featured nearly 100 players were Lakers backup center Dwight Howard and starting shooting guard Avery Bradley, sources told ESPN. Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving was a driving influence on the call.
Storyline: Season Resuming?
Sources tell The Athletic that a group consisting of 80-plus players — including NBPA Vice President Kyrie Irving, NBPA president Chris Paul, Kevin Durant, Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard, Donovan Mitchell and Avery Bradley — discussed finding unity and a way to attack a cause amid the nationwide unrest stemming from racial injustice, systematic racism and police brutality as well as what the world continues to face during the coronavirus pandemic.
Then there’s players such as Avery Bradley, who grew up in a home where showing emotions was encouraged. “If I needed to cry, I needed to cry,” Bradley said. “To this day, sometimes I might watch a little Disney movie and it will probably make me cry. I don’t really care.” Bradley said that Bryant’s death humanized athletes. “It takes off that whole Superman cape in a way,” Bradley said. “Seeing one of our own brothers, what happened. I think we’re all human. And people forget that as professional athletes we have feelings too. This was a moment where I feel like everybody had a chance to see that.”
Then there’s players such as Avery Bradley, who grew up in a home where showing emotions was encouraged. “If I needed to cry, I needed to cry,” Bradley said. “To this day, sometimes I might watch a little Disney movie and it will probably make me cry. I don’t really care.” Bradley said that Bryant’s death humanized athletes. “It takes off that whole Superman cape in a way,” Bradley said. “Seeing one of our own brothers, what happened. I think we’re all human. And people forget that as professional athletes we have feelings too. This was a moment where I feel like everybody had a chance to see that.”
Pelinka has declined interviews. James has declined to talk in-depth about Bryant out of respect for his family. And Davis declined to answer how Pelinka has helped the team handle a difficult month. Accounts suggest, though, that Pelinka has become a source of comfort within the organization. “His way of helping is coming in and being positive every single day,” forward Avery Bradley told USA TODAY Sports. “With him being positive, it makes us a little happier. It helps us be comfortable about everything going on when we’re seeing a smile on Rob’s face.”
But the Lakers don’t have anyone else who can consistently handle the ball under duress, outside James. Avery Bradley is probably ill-suited if Clippers guard Patrick Beverley picks him up with full-court pressure. At least Rondo has some of the skills needed to get the Lakers into their offense—more so than Alex Caruso, Quinn Cook, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and Bradley. “He overdribbles,” said a Western Conference executive. “The team needs another guard who can handle but who can also play off of LeBron as a shooter. That’s not Rondo.”
The score at halftime might have been mistaken for another tribute to Kobe Bryant: Lakers 81, Sacramento Kings 64. It didn’t occur to the Lakers until after the game when they looked at the box score. They couldn’t help but wonder about the cosmic connection to the man who once scored 81 points in a game for the Lakers. “I guess he’s with us,” Anthony Davis said. “Like our angel at all times, there with us,” Avery Bradley said.
Storyline: Kobe Bryant Death
“It’s different, but I prefer my people on the East Coast,” Bradley said. “Some people might be offended by that, but I mean, especially knowing I’m from the West Coast. I don’t know if it’s because it’s home for me or what, but I just feel like people are real good friends. That’s all it is. I could go years without talking to someone in Boston but [when] I see them, it’s a real friendship. People are honest, that’s the culture. East Coast, but specifically Boston. People are just good people.”