Bol Bol Rumors

All NBA Players
#10
Bol Bol
Bol Bol
Position: C
Born: 11/16/99
Height: 7-2 / 2.18
Weight:235 lbs. / 106.6 kg.
Salary: $79,568
Three years ago, Madut Bol was on break at his Amazon warehouse job — a job he didn’t like — when his old college teammate reached out: Madut’s half brother Bol Bol was playing in an elite showcase that night in New York. Did Madut want to go? Madut had to finish his shift and technically didn’t have any more time to take off. But he didn’t care. He told his boss he was leaving early, then drove 60 miles from Trenton, N.J., to Brooklyn Bridge Park, the site of the showcase. Madut hadn’t seen Bol in four months, and even then, it was for only a minute or two when Bol had played in another showcase in New York. Their conversation after that game had been awkward, distant, like two people who hardly knew each other, which wasn’t far from the truth. This time, Madut didn’t care if Bol knew he was there. “My dad never saw me play,” Madut says. “So, I was like, ‘I don’t want Bol to be on this level and nobody comes to see him play.’”
But more surreal were the ways in which Bol reminded Madut of their father, Manute Bol, the tallest person to ever play in the NBA and one of the league’s great humanitarians. An admirer called him the “Muhammad Ali or Nelson Mandela of his time” for all he had done in South Sudan. “You can look right at (Bol) and tell,” Madut says. “Just the way he walks. People say the same thing to me: ‘You walk like your dad.’ I don’t see it because I’m not looking at me walking. But seeing him walk, he walks just like Dad. Smiles like Dad. Just looks exactly like him.” After the game, Madut drove home without talking to Bol.
For years, he has wanted a relationship with Bol, a second-round pick this year who plays for the Denver Nuggets. He says he wants to be there for him, to help him, guide him and support him — all the things a big brother is supposed to do. But ever since their dad died in 2010, they have rarely spent time together or even spoken. (The Nuggets declined to make Bol available for this story.) The reasons why are complicated and go far beyond their decade in age difference. When Madut was 5 or 6 in the mid-’90s, his dad packed his bags and told him, “I’ll be back.” There was nothing unusual about the moment; Manute traveled all the time. But that time, Madut waited and waited for him to come home. Days turned into weeks. Madut asked his mom where his dad was, but she had no idea either. Weeks turned into months. Madut received no phone calls, no letters or emails. One moment, his dad was his hero, the larger-than-life personality who dominated every room and cracked open Madut’s closed-off personality. The next, he was gone without an explanation. Madut and his brothers and sisters learned about their dad’s new life in Sudan from a 2001 Sports Illustrated story in which Manute talked to a reporter while his second wife, Ajok, cradled their 19-month-old son, Bol.