Chris Bosh Rumors

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Chris Bosh
Chris Bosh
Position: -
Born: 03/24/84
Height: 6-11 / 2.11
Weight:210 lbs. / 95.3 kg.
Earnings: $242,110,053 ($269,644,815*)
Chris Bosh: I was a freshman when Tim Duncan won a championship in his second season. Watching someone weaponize the fundamentals the way he did—earning his nickname in the process—made me realize how much I needed to work on my own. The summer TD brought home his first title, I was in Dallas, working with Kenny Blakeney and Thomas Hill on my fundamentals in any gym we could find. Kenny, who’s about to start coaching Makur Maker at Howard, helped expand my very idea of what the fundamentals could be. Sure, I learned the Triple Threat that summer. But I also came to understand that if I wanted to devote my life to basketball, I’d need to rely on my mind as much as my body.
Chris Bosh: I’ve talked about the importance of treating the playoffs like you would any regular game. But the Finals test that. Because there isn’t anything normal about them. Every June, the NBA takes over two major American cities. The media follows. Before we ever stepped onto the same court as the Spurs, we felt the microscope descend, as we practiced in front of cameras and reporters for an hour each day. Think about that: Mandatory public practice. How are you supposed to treat it like an ordinary game when you’ve got dozens of reporters watching you get stretched out?
Chris Bosh: You can watch the footage, or you can hear it from me: We didn’t like the Pacers. And they didn’t like us. All these years later, I still remember the jab one of their guys took at us before we played in the Conference Finals. The Pacers, he said, were “built, not bought.” I understood why he said it. Those guys were gonna do whatever they could to get inside our heads—or, as was the case the next year, inside our ears. But, to be honest, their trash talk didn’t do anything but get us even more hype. Because we despised these guys. And, if I’m being straight with you, we didn’t love their fans either.
Chris Bosh: It’d be hard to overstate the influence Hoosiers still has on that town. And if you haven’t seen that movie in a while, you might not remember the racial undertones, but we did. Hoosiers is about a team of white guys who played the right way taking down the City Boys, who just so happened to be Black. And any time you travel to Indiana for an NBA game, you’re faced with the same narrative: This is basketball country. Sure, many of the players on the Pacers were Black, but have you ever seen the crowd in Bankers Life Fieldhouse? Shit’s as white as a Trump rally.
Chris Bosh: To some extent, this is true wherever you play in the NBA. Every team has every kind of fan—white and Black, rich and poor—but tickets are expensive, income inequality is real, and no matter the city, you’re liable to look at the stands—especially the courtsides—and catch a sea of white faces. For a long time, players kept quiet about this, but moments of reckoning like the one we’re in now are when we confront hard truths. Like the fact that the fans in the stands at NBA games tend to be much less diverse than the players on the court, not to mention the viewers watching at home.
Meanwhile, high atop the Chicago skyline, Bosh was in a conference room receiving a pitch from the Heat — a meeting punctuated by Pat Riley unfurling a small velvet carpet onto the table, followed by the presentation of a small velvet bag. “Oh, yeah, Pat brought his rings out. It looked just like a Crown Royal bag,” Bosh said. “He puts it down, like boom. Big boy talk. When he ended the meeting, Pat gave me a 2006 Heat championship ring.” “Take it. Keep it. Give it back to me when you win one,” Riley said to Bosh. “I still haven’t given it back,” Bosh said. “I wonder if he even remembers that? I think I mentioned it once, like, ‘Yo, do you want that ring back?’ And he said, ‘What are you talking about?’ And I kept it moving.”
Chris Bosh: The moments when I was most inspired by Bron and D weren’t when we were on opposing teams but when we were on the same team—starting during The Olympics in 2008. That summer, Kobe set the tone for all of us, which meant nobody was messing around. And the intensity started on the day of our first practice in Beijing. That morning, I headed down to breakfast early, which made me feel good about myself—because I figured most of my teammates were still sleeping. And I was right. Basically no one else was down there… except for Kobe. Not only was he the first to breakfast, but he also had ice bags on his knees, which meant he’d already worked out.
Chris Bosh: Mind you, this was less than two weeks after the Lakers lost in the Finals to the Celtics. You couldn’t have blamed him for resting up and focusing on being healthy for the next season. But instead, the dude was pushing himself harder than any human being I had ever met— waking up at 4:00 a.m. to hit the gym. That meant all of us were gonna push ourselves, too. With Kobe as an inspiration, D and Bron elevated their games that summer, balling out at practices at a level I’d never seen before. And they, in turn, inspired me. Hell, we all inspired each other. Because we knew that if we didn’t step up, there was no way we’d get playing time. So I started hitting the gym earlier than I ever did before.
Chris Bosh: Every day, I was inspired by Bron and D-Wade to push myself harder and reach higher. Not a practice went by during our four years playing together where they didn’t encourage me to leave everything on the floor; and I’d like to think I did the same for them. So, when Lebron told me he’d reinvented his post game in the first few weeks of the 2012 offseason, I knew I had to step it up. And I did. Quickly, our team’s mantra became “Repeat.” And with new additions to our team, like Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis, we were confident we would do it, as long as we kept the intensity at level ten.
Chris Bosh: Before that summer, guys would be in the league, they would get in the league and sign a four-year deal. And at the end of those they’d sign an extension for six years. The first time you’re a free agent is TEN YEARS in. If you’re trying to win a championship, you don’t have much flexibility. We were pretty young into our careers. But people were dealing with that pressure to win a championship. Bron had MJ comparisons and all that stuff. We felt that we were changing the course of how things were going. Bron’s under the pressure. D won one already, he wanted to get back. It became this game of chess. Boston at that time had the big three, they were juggernauts.
Chris Bosh: When did you start thinking about joining them? I would say as free agency got closer. The 08/09 year, I had a lot going on with myself. I kind of came to some realization how hard it is to win in the NBA. I was still very optimistic. I really tried my best to excel the team. Trying harder and trying harder with no results became deflating. I believe Kobe was coming off the back-to-back. LeBron had been to the Finals, D had won one. And I’m not even scratching the surface. Not even competitive in the first round yet. It was a little deflating, trying everything I could do to be a great player.
My understanding is that it almost happened in Chicago. Chris Bosh: They had some cap space and they made a hard push. But they couldn’t get all three of us. One of the things they did was they were trying to put me in the middle. They were saying if you come somebody’s definitely coming. Taj Gibson, Joakim, Luol, D. Rose who was coming off an MVP season … that was a very very solid foundation. And they were on rookie contracts. They had the potential to be pretty good. But you were living under Mike’s shadow. They were trying to negotiate with me: If you just sign …
Storyline: The Decision
Were you reading the comments? Do you remember some particular thing someone said? Chris Bosh: I was avid in social media. I was active on Twitter as soon as it came out. It would ruin my day. When I was new to it it was catching me off guard. At the time I’m like reading it ruined my day. Finally I was like damn, I have to step back. A particular day, we had like kind of a family reunion. I just remember I was driving on my local road where I used to live and I was just reading this comment after comment. And I was like OK I can’t do this any more. I didn’t expect this. I shouldn’t feel like this looking at a phone screen. That was only the summer! We still had a month until training camp.
Does that summer feel at all connected to you to this summer, Trump and all that? Chris Bosh: There’s things that in America people haven’t talked about. Being frank: The country was founded on slavery. That’s a known fact that can not be escaped. Of course there are going to be underlying tones in a society, of oppression, and racism. It’s naturally built in. And for women too. Women were not in the room when they were writing the Constitution. That all has to be thought about while we’re working into these things. I’m from Dallas. I have family in Alabama, Mississippi with rich history with NAACP and being involved in the cause. Black history was HUGE in my family. Knowing these things was super important. I’ve been aware. But I’m still learning. Lets’ just come out and admit it. Let’s not act like it’s not there. Confederate flag is heritage? That’s fine, ok. But you can go all over the world: the second-place statues, the flags, they eradicate it.
Chris Bosh: If we didn’t win, we would have been the laughing stock of the sports world. We would have been one of the most under-achieving teams in the history of the NBA. Some of us might even have been traded. I still remember standing in the huddle at the end of the game. Everyone was quiet. Thousand-yard stares. The trophy was being wheeled out. They started putting up ropes around the court. Even some of our fans headed for the exits, because The Spurs were up by five with 28 seconds left. D’s knee was hurt. We were a few missed shots away from losing it all. I remember thinking, “Holy shit. Oh no.”
Chris Bosh: If we didn’t win, we would have been the laughing stock of the sports world. We would have been one of the most under-achieving teams in the history of the NBA. Some of us might even have been traded. I still remember standing in the huddle at the end of the game. Everyone was quiet. Thousand-yard stares. The trophy was being wheeled out. They started putting up ropes around the court. Even some of our fans headed for the exits, because The Spurs were up by five with 28 seconds left. D’s knee was hurt. We were a few missed shots away from losing it all. I remember thinking, “Holy shit. Oh no.”
Miami Heat president Pat Riley recently gave high praise to Los Angeles Lakers superstar LeBron James. While reminiscing on the formation of the Heat’s Big 3, the former head coach revealed he believes James is arguably the best player ever. “After July the first, I just laid it out on the table,” Riley recalled. “LeBron and Chris [Bosh], two of the greatest players in our game. And LeBron, maybe the greatest player of all time, with Dwyane [Wade]. All you have to do is put it on the table.”
Storyline: GOAT Debate
During seven years with the Raptors, Eversley would be promoted to vice president of scouting and assistant general manager. At one point, Eversley and Masai Ujiri both worked under Colangelo as assistant general managers. “You’re working for your hometown team, the game you love, you got a pretty good position with a growing organization, you’ve got a boss who’s giving you autonomy to grow and he’s giving you a platform to grow,” said Eversley, who lists being part of the drafting of DeMar DeRozan as his greatest accomplishment in Toronto. “It was perfect, it was tailor-made. At the time, we had a little bit of brand building to do with the franchise in the organization. Trying to put Toronto on the NBA map. … “I worked with Chris Bosh, who was an emerging star, he was about to become an All-Star, developed a great relationship and friendship with him, which I still have today. I just learned a bunch of different things.”
The July 4 decision began with James asking Wade to speak on the phone. Chris Bosh joined the call. “I said Miami got the space if we want to go. You in?” Wade said. “July 4 was the moment we decided to play together.” But James then didn’t return Wade’s calls or texts. “Then we hear he has a special coming up on ESPN,” Wade said. “We’re like, ‘What the [expletive] is going on?’ Maybe he changed his mind. I haven’t talked to him. I have a party [to watch James’ special, The Decision] because I don’t know what the hell is going to go on.”
Chris Bosh will not be a first-ballot Hall of Famer. Bosh, 35, was not one of the eight finalists named Friday at All-Star Weekend in Chicago for induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Bosh still has time to get into the Hall of Fame and he’s expected to get inducted at some point, but 2020 marked the first year he was eligible for consideration after his playing career came to an end in 2016.
Chris Bosh: This was my last picture with you at the 2019 World Cup. We had dinner that night afterwards and we had a legendary night just hanging at the dinner table. We talked all night about writing, storytelling, film, books, music and the game. You told me how you were going to win another Oscar and a Tony award for things you had in the works. You talked about how GiGi is a beast on the court and how fundamentally sound she was and how she had every move down at her young age. I was just soaking up as much of your greatness as I could. We talked about your scheduled days and how you put everything in to being a father, coach and executive among other things and how to balance it all. I enjoyed our convos and I took so much to try and learn from you for my next chapter in life after ball.I find myself racking my brain trying to remember your words that night because I just knew there would be another conversation and I’d have even more questions to ask you the next time we met up. You’ve set the standard for excellence around the world. I cherish the moments we had man. Most importantly I pray for strength for your wife & kids. This one hurts really bad. Going forward I know you’ll be that voice pushing me and others to do more when we’re tired and think we have nothing left to give. Rest In Peace my brother.Going forward I know you’ll be that voice pushing me and others to do more when we’re tired and think we have nothing left to give. Rest In Peace my brother.Going forward I know you’ll be that voice pushing me and others to do more when we’re tired and think we have nothing left to give. Rest In Peace my brother.

In addition to Bryant, Duncan, Garnett and Bosh, other players nominated for the first time this year include Shawn Marion, Michael Finley, Mark Eaton and Buck Williams. Meanwhile, Chauncey Billups, Mark Jackson, Tim Hardaway, Richard Hamilton, Chris Webber, Ben Wallace and Marcus Camby are among those on the ballot who have been nominated multiple times.
Are you a Hall of Famer? Kevin Love: It’s too early to tell. I don’t feel like my story is finished. I’m 31. Yeah, I’m 12 years in. Went to four straight (NBA) Finals, was hurt last year. I feel so good, I really do. I feel like I have so much more to give. I don’t know if after this contract it’ll be two more years, I don’t know. But I have a number of really, really good years left in me. I think I still have work to do. Sometimes I bring it up or I’ve brought it up talking about other players. And people say, “You’re in.” I’m like, “No, I’m not.” I don’t think so. If they’re talking about Chris Bosh? Chris Bosh is a m———— Hall of Famer. Carmelo Anthony is a Hall of Famer. If Tracy McGrady is a Hall of Famer, Carmelo Anthony is a Hall of Famer. He’s won three Olympic gold medals, 10-time All-Star, All-NBA, scoring champ. C’mon now. He’s in.
They moved on to Joel Embiid, but working around the schedule of an active player proved impossible. The studio gave them a list of retired players. They met with a few, including Chris Bosh, Josh Safdie said. Garnett’s name was on the list, too. They cringed. They agreed to meet with Garnett anyway. Garnett’s representatives told them they would have an hour. The meeting lasted three hours. Garnett regaled them with stories. He was different in person than he was on television and in media interviews.