Clint Capela Rumors

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#15
Clint Capela
Clint Capela
Position: C
Born: 05/18/94
Height: 6-10 / 2.08
Weight:211 lbs. / 95.7 kg.
Salary: $16,896,552
But, this time it’s a little different: now that true center Clint Capela is a Hawk, Collins, sliding back to his natural position at power forward, can’t wait to connect with Capela on a lob. “For me, having another dude that’s in the same level of athlete that I am, it’s going to be amazing to sort of know how to throw him open and know how he wants to catch the ball,” Collins said.“I’ve been working on throwing lobs and trying to get him open above the rim because I know that’s what I like to do, that’s what he likes to do, so we can speak the same language.”
Huerter also spoke about what the club needs to do to gel together and grow into a winning program after back-to-back seasons near the cellar of the NBA in terms of standings. “It feels like in a lot of ways, I don’t want to say a new team, but it feels like we brought together a lot of players that we haven’t had the full chance to put together and figure out what’s going to work for us,” Huerter stated. “That starts with Clint (Capela), getting Dewayne (Dedmon) back. Really just having a full team. Moving forward, I’d imagine we’re going to sign guys (too)… I think we’re really just excited to put together a full team moving forward that’s now been together a couple years and wants to remove the ‘young’ label and wants to win.”
“I think the sky’s the limit for us, to be honest with you,” Reddish said. “We have all the pieces that it takes to be a really good team in the NBA. Obviously with Trae being Trae, we have good size all around, and I think adding (center Clint Capela) into the lineup is going to help a lot. Obviously added some veteran guys to us, so that always helps. I think next year’s going to be a really good year for us, and I’m looking forward to it.”
“I call every now and then, and they check on me to see how I’m doing and how I’m feeling,” Capela said of his virtual rehab process. “If they need to do any adjustments, I just let them know. If I feel good about exercises, I let them know. I do a report once a week to let them know and make sure the exercises are good. If I feel good about it and if we decide to move forward with the exercises because I’m feeling better about it — that’s pretty much how it works.”
“I call every now and then, and they check on me to see how I’m doing and how I’m feeling,” Capela said of his virtual rehab process. “If they need to do any adjustments, I just let them know. If I feel good about exercises, I let them know. I do a report once a week to let them know and make sure the exercises are good. If I feel good about it and if we decide to move forward with the exercises because I’m feeling better about it — that’s pretty much how it works.”
“If you look at the Eastern Conference standings, if you can carry that over to the next 25 games, now all the sudden you probably are in contention, and you get to the last month of the season and you are fighting for a playoff spot,” Schlenk said.“So I don’t think it’s outside the realm of possibility that this group could have done that this year and add in a guy like Clint at center, and Dewayne at center, we all know that was one of our bigger weak spots throughout the year, I don’t think there’s any reason why we couldn’t. The hard part about projecting into next year is we don’t know what’s going to happen in the draft, we don’t know what’s going to happen in free agency. We don’t even know when those two things are going to take place, so it’s hard to project at this point.”
We talked about how much the game has changed, but are there any active players who sort of remind you of yourself? Theo Ratliff: Yeah, I think the guy we, the Hawks, just acquired: Clint Capela. He definitely mirrors my mentality and approach to the game. He’s not a guy who really worries about being a major part of the offense, but he’s always looking to help his teammates by blocking shots and rebounding the ball.
“I was just dealing with it,” Capela said of why he kept playing. “With Houston, there were a lot of injuries — you’re really just trying to go out there and play and trying to get the win. I had to learn how to deal with it and play through it. Sometimes, the first quarter was OK and the second quarter was OK. Then you come back in the second half and it’s super sore. You just go through it. I know a lot of players play hurt, especially when you’re on a team that expects a lot from you. It was an important year with my previous team. It was something that I really wanted to be a part of.”
Storyline: Clint Capela Injury
Capela said the Hawks training staff has not told him to expect to miss the entire season. It’s a day-by-day process of figuring out how much weight his heel can bear. He gets to do a little bit of conditioning, limited basketball activity and some contact on his feet. Capela said he 100 percent wants to play again this season because “I’m not here to sit on the bench and clap my hands. My job is to go out there and play and be as dominant as I can. When I don’t do that, it’s hard.”
The Atlanta Hawks are set to have the most cap space this summer with $50.9 million available. This would be assuming they renounce all cap holds and waive Brandon Goodwin. Prior to trading for Clint Capela and Dewayne Dedmon, the Hawks were projected to have more than $70 million in cap space, which was way too much to spend in this free agency. $50 million can also be considered too much for the Hawks given their current team. Atlanta has point guard and big men needs filled, so they could use their cap space on wing players.
Andre Drummond ($28.6 million) is soon facing a very harsh and frustrating reality. In the past few offseasons, centers have been getting smaller and smaller guaranteed deals. In 2018, a considerably low cap-space offseason, we saw non-stretch centers Clint Capela and Jusuf Nurkic earn $16 million and $12 million annually, respectively. Charlotte and New York are the only two teams with significant cap space who make some sense for Drummond, but it’s hard to see either team shelling most of their cap space just to him. If Drummond were to opt-out and test the market, he might end up getting offered similar figures as Capela and Nurkic did. That is a steep paycut overnight, and because he was traded in February he is not extension eligible for the rest of the season. If he were to opt-out, it probably won’t be without assurances of a lucrative deal via a cap space team or a sign-and-trade. Otherwise, expect him to opt-in.
Storyline: Andre Drummond Free Agency
The plan is still to re-evaluate Capela March 4. He’ll be out for a while longer, with Pierce adding he’d be surprised if Capela returns for the Hawks’ games in Washington March 6 and in Memphis March 7. Pierce had originally guessed Capela would miss 7-10 games coming out of the All-Star break (the Hawks’ 11th post-All Star break game is a home game vs. the Knicks March 11), but there’s no way to exactly determine how quickly Capela will rehab, which informs the timetable of his return. “It probably will be 15 (games) or less, after this weekend and next weekend’s over with,” Pierce said.
How did you weigh the pros and cons of trading Capela? Morey: “Clint is a great player and great human. He was an amazing Rocket and is definitely going to be missed. Obviously he’s going to do great in Atlanta. The reason to do this is James Harden. I think the key to winning a championship is get superstars who are great players. We have that with Westbrook and Harden, and then get the right fit and the right style around them. With Mike’s approach with shooting and space, that’s where we’re at our best. Adding a Covington where we can shore up our perimeter defense and also be a top-notch shooter is a huge part of our ability to play that way. We’re ready to go to battle.