Clyde Drexler Rumors

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Clyde Drexler
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Earnings: $27,902,000 ($47,225,767*)
Damian Lillard joined Hall of Famer Clyde Drexler as the only Portland players to score 15,000 points for the franchise, finishing with 34 as the Trail Blazers spoiled Golden State’s home opener with a 123-98 win over the Warriors on Friday night. ”Fifteen thousand is a huge accomplishment, something that I’m proud of but my work is far from done,” Lillard said.
Drexler then described the tipping point of what was a very difficult decision for him at that time: “They got rid of Kevin Duckworth, and I was like ‘Hold up guys, we don’t have a center,’” he said. “And then they started saying, ‘We need to rebuild. We need to trade some of these veterans while they can still play so that we can get something for them.’ And that’s when I orchestrated the trade to Houston. But if they had not done that, I would have finished my career there.”
Meanwhile, Jordan was the best perimeter player of the ’90s. And the second-best was … John Stockton? Clyde Drexler? Grant Hill for that one year? Especially after Magic Johnson retired in 1991, nobody came anywhere close. Instead, Jordan’s era was one where Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Patrick Ewing and a young Shaquille O’Neal were the dominant forces. Malone and Barkley were the players who beat him out for MVP awards, while Olajuwon pushed Jordan down to third in 1993 and Robinson finished second, third and third at various points. No sane person considered another perimeter player ahead of Jordan on their MVP ballot from 1991 to 1998. In the two years Jordan (mostly) sat out, 193 of the 202 first-place MVP votes went to the bigs I listed above. Just nine went to perimeter players of any stripe. The six bigs I named above were the top six players in the 1995 MVP vote; only then did other perimeter players become a topic.
Storyline: GOAT Debate
On some occasions, a bubbly, energetic and eager rookie named Cliff Robinson would venture into the locker room after undergoing an extensive warmup routine and urge Drexler to get his game face on. “Come on, Clyde, we’ve got to get ready!” Robinson would say. Drexler, seven years into his career, would stare at the 6-foot-10 forward like the overzealous rookie Robinson was and think: “He’s telling me how to prepare?” At the same time, Drexler appreciated Robinson for his competitive zeal. “He was always so fired up and ready to go,” Drexler said. “Cliff was intense.”