Clyde Drexler Rumors

All NBA Players
#0
Clyde Drexler
Position: -
Born: -
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Earnings: $27,902,000 ($47,225,767*)
Meanwhile, Jordan was the best perimeter player of the ’90s. And the second-best was … John Stockton? Clyde Drexler? Grant Hill for that one year? Especially after Magic Johnson retired in 1991, nobody came anywhere close. Instead, Jordan’s era was one where Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Patrick Ewing and a young Shaquille O’Neal were the dominant forces. Malone and Barkley were the players who beat him out for MVP awards, while Olajuwon pushed Jordan down to third in 1993 and Robinson finished second, third and third at various points. No sane person considered another perimeter player ahead of Jordan on their MVP ballot from 1991 to 1998. In the two years Jordan (mostly) sat out, 193 of the 202 first-place MVP votes went to the bigs I listed above. Just nine went to perimeter players of any stripe. The six bigs I named above were the top six players in the 1995 MVP vote; only then did other perimeter players become a topic.
Storyline: GOAT Debate
On some occasions, a bubbly, energetic and eager rookie named Cliff Robinson would venture into the locker room after undergoing an extensive warmup routine and urge Drexler to get his game face on. “Come on, Clyde, we’ve got to get ready!” Robinson would say. Drexler, seven years into his career, would stare at the 6-foot-10 forward like the overzealous rookie Robinson was and think: “He’s telling me how to prepare?” At the same time, Drexler appreciated Robinson for his competitive zeal. “He was always so fired up and ready to go,” Drexler said. “Cliff was intense.”
Robinson’s signature headband, which only enhanced his adopted persona, often drew playful jeers from his teammates. “He loved that, though,” Drexler said. “That was his thing. ‘Uncle Cliffy.’ He thought that was funny.” Robinson often had a playful sense of humor, Drexler remembers. “He was funny,” Drexler said. “He was always cracking jokes. He had a good sense of humor but he was always pretty lighthearted.” Come game time, however, Robinson would become serious. “Cliff was an intense competitor,” Drexler said with a laugh. “The key word is ‘competitor.’ He didn’t like to lose.”
Storyline: Cliff Robinson Death
Nearly 28 years later, Drexler respectfully declined to engage in any trash talk. He laughed and expressed foggy memory of joking with former NBA on NBC reporter Ahmed Rashad that Jordan “stole all of my moves.” Drexler said the Blazers challenged Chicago in a six-game series that he called “ultra competitive.” “Everyone has a healthy respect for each other at this stage of their life,” Drexler said. “You have to take it in perspective. We were truly competitive. I haven’t seen (the documentary). So I don’t know how to respond to your question. But I have a lot of respect for Michael and Magic. I wish them nothing but well.”
Storyline: Michael Jordan Documentary