Top Stories

David West Rumors

All NBA Players
#0
David West
David West
Position: -
Born: 08/29/80
Height: 6-9 / 2.06
Weight:239 lbs. / 108.4 kg.
Earnings: $93,047,916 ($107,756,729*)
David West: “I thought about this the other day. When [Andrea] Bargnani and [Chris] Bosh were in Toronto, the reason why that sh** didn’t work is ’cause the NBA let us beat them up! We beat up Bargnani, they let us body Bosh. Like, Bosh and Bargnani right now, they would blow this NBA out of the water. They were damn near impossible to guard. I’m serious. The only reason Bargnani didn’t have a (successful) career was ’cause the referees let people like me beat him up!” “In today’s game, he would be killin’ because he would be protected. Ryan, you know, you remember — he would try that sweep at the three-point line; they wasn’t giving him that sh**, that rip-through. We could grab both arms.”
Etan Thomas: “What happened with Roy Hibbert? He was doing well and then it just went south.” David West: “It was a mental thing. It was all mental. Roy played basketball a lot of years because he was big. He was made to play, and then he developed a love for the game much later — and actually, it wasn’t until he was in the NBA that he really got a love for the game. In Indy, we had it situated perfectly. And for him, Frank [Vogel] is the most positive [person]; he’s gonna coach you up regardless of what you’re doing. He’s gonna coach you up, and that’s what Roy needed. He had Roy playing the best basketball of his career, and that was all Frank. Because there were games where big fella was out of it; his timing was off and he got into a couple bad funks, but Frank was able to keep him steady.
Alex Kennedy: Who are some other players who could’ve done so much more if it wasn’t for injuries? For example, Brandon Roy comes to mind immediately. David West: “Greg Oden. The one year that dude was healthy, we played them like three times in the first month-and-a-half of the season or something. I remember bumping up against him and being like, ‘Yo, this dude is going to be a beast.’ We couldn’t do anything with him — me and Tyson [Chandler] together — he was just dunking everything around the basket. He was 285-to-290 [pounds], but not like a bulky fat. If Greg Oden had stayed around, I don’t think small-ball evolves. If he’s healthy, I don’t think small-ball evolves the way it did. No way.”
Brown’s X’s and O’s always have been solid. His improvisation and flexibility needed work. Now 50, he considers it part of the maturation process gained from being in the company of such smart and affable veteran players, from Steph Curry and Draymond Green, to Kevin Durant and Andre Iguodala, to Kevin Durant and David West, among others. “You learn a lot from those players, especially from guys that have been around for a long time and been with a lot of different teams, been in losing situations and winning situations,” Brown said. “You learn a lot about how to coach them. Those guys have all been very instrumental in my growth, not only as a coach but also as a person.”
“What happened with Roy Hibbert? He was doing well and then it just went south.” David West: “It was a mental thing. It was all mental. Roy played basketball a lot of years because he was big. He was made to play, and then he developed a love for the game much later — and actually, it wasn’t until he was in the NBA that he really got a love for the game. In Indy, we had it situated perfectly. And for him, Frank [Vogel] is the most positive [person]; he’s gonna coach you up regardless of what you’re doing. He’s gonna coach you up, and that’s what Roy needed. He had Roy playing the best basketball of his career, and that was all Frank. Because there were games where big fella was out of it; his timing was off and he got into a couple bad funks, but Frank was able to keep him steady. “
Do you think social media was a part of that? David West: “Yeah. I used to be on him about that shit. Like, ‘Yo, don’t even look at that shit.’ But it was hard because at the same time… one thing that I will say about social media is as much as you have to, as a player, ignore it, everybody else is telling you, ‘This is where you’ve gotta market yourself! This is where you’ve gotta brand yourself.’ Your agent, your marketing people, the teams are telling you that you have to have a presence on social media, but then [they’re also] like, ‘Ignore what’s being said on social media.’ It’s a very tough balance for players to deal with. I used to be like, ‘Roy, we don’t even know who these people are. It’s fine. Let them say what they say.’ But, those things wore him down.”