De'Aaron Fox Rumors

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#5
De'Aaron Fox
De'Aaron Fox
Position: G
Born: 12/20/97
Height: 6-3 / 1.91
Weight:171 lbs. / 77.6 kg.
Salary: $6,392,760
Fox, a 22-year-old point guard who will soon be eligible for a massive contract extension, intends to lead the Kings for years to come. Fox made that clear in a series of previously unpublished interviews with The Sacramento Bee before the NBA suspended its season due to the coronavirus pandemic. He reaffirmed those feelings Wednesday in a Zoom call with reporters from Golden 1 Center, where the Kings are preparing to resume their season at Walt Disney World Resort in Florida. “It’s all the same,” Fox said. “… I see myself being here. I want to be here.”
Storyline: De'Aaron Fox Extension
“I want to be here,” Fox said. “Obviously, I want to win, but I want to do it here. It’s been, what — 13, 14 years since the last time the Kings made the playoffs? I want to be a part of the first one. “Obviously, we all want to win. There are some things we know we need to work on as a team, and I’m here for that. Every team has gone through it, probably not as long as the Kings have, but I want to be a part of that. I want to be able to get to the playoffs with this team, and, hopefully, when I’m a veteran in this league, be able to be a (championship) contender.”
Revenue losses stemming from the COVID-19 crisis and the NBA’s frayed relationship with China could result in a significant reduction in the salary cap. Max contracts are calculated based on the salary cap, so any reduction in the cap would cause a corresponding decline in max contract figures. As a result, the Kings might end up saving money on Fox’s new deal, but league executives and agents say there is too much uncertainty to project how much a cap hit might impact the team’s books or Fox’s future earnings. “It’s just way too premature to predict what’s going to happen,” Priority Sports and Entertainment CEO Mark Bartelstein said. “There’s just so much to play out in the next few months.”

Top young players seek NBA insurance

On the cusp of hundreds of millions of dollars in contract extensions, several of the NBA’s top young stars had a Friday call with National Basketball Players Association officials about the possibility of league-financed insurance policies to protect against career-threatening injuries in the bubble restart in Orlando, sources tell ESPN. Miami’s Bam Adebayo, Sacramento’s De’Aaron Fox, the Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma, Utah’s Donovan Mitchell and Boston’s Jayson Tatum — five players with significant star and earning power — talked with executive director Michele Roberts and senior counsel Ron Klempner about the NBPA facilitating talks with the league on possible insurance allowances for players, sources said.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 1020 more rumors
The NBPA and NBA have engaged on the possibility of protections for players in the event of serious COVID-19 illnesses or career-threatening injuries suffered in Orlando, sources told ESPN. The union and league are still negotiating details on the revised terms to the collective bargaining agreement before the 22-team restart. Together, Adebayo, Fox, Kuzma, Mitchell and Tatum have hoped the collective voice of such a starry group of elite young talent could shape the league’s thinking on sharing in the risk on insurance not only for them, but a broader swath of players returning to the season’s restart in Orlando, sources said.
Ben Simmons’ Nike Blazer Mid ’77 Motivation debuts Thursday at House of Hoops by Foot Locker and online at footlocker.com. The 76ers point guard’s new sneaker is part of a Nike series recognizing the motivational phrases and pregame rituals of standouts that include Simmons, Dallas Mavericks point guard Luka Dončić, Sacramento Kings point guard De’Aaron Fox, and Phoenix Mercury center Brittney Griner.
“It’s definitely crazy,” said Sacramento Kings guard De’Aaron Fox, who grew up just outside of Houston, in Katy, Texas. As someone who loves the game, he is heartened by the fact that people still want to play. But he also realizes the severity of the moment. “It wouldn’t have stopped if they didn’t take the rims down,” Fox said. “People want to continue to play, but you have to think about the safety of others, the safety of people’s kids and the elderly. I don’t think it’s a bad idea. It shows how important the game of basketball is to people that they’re still trying to find a way to play. But it should always be safety first.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
CALIPARI WAS STRAIGHT with Adebayo: He would not shoot jumpers or bring the ball up — skills that had blossomed over Adebayo’s high school career. He would set screens, roll hard, play defense. “John didn’t let him do anything,” Riley chuckles. Adebayo worked on other skills after practices and in night sessions with Kenny Payne, a Kentucky assistant. “He wanted to be a guard so badly,” De’Aaron Fox, Adebayo’s teammate at Kentucky, says with a laugh. “He also went to every class — a lot more than I did.”