Dell Curry Rumors

All NBA Players
#0
Dell Curry
Dell Curry
Position: -
Born: 06/25/64
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:205 lbs. / 93 kg.
Earnings: $19,296,000 ($31,481,480*)
“I know he’s really looking forward to this year because he’s had a chance to play and practice and really concentrate,” Dell Curry said in a conference call. “He’s been able to unwind, as opposed to finishing the finals and a week later he’s in Tahoe without a chance to unwind and rest up. He has a real good short game. He’s definitely thinking that maybe it’s his year.”
Curry was fortunate to be the son of NBA player Dell Curry. His parents, having grown up in rural Virginia, had experienced racism but were able to shield Stephen and his brother and sister while at the same time educating them on the matter. Curry, who was raised Charlotte, N.C., had a different experience. “I was surrounded by (racism) but I didn’t experience it as much because my dad was playing in the NBA and there was a certain benefit that came with that in terms of how people interacted with us,” Curry said. “Sports took us to a place where they could put it aside for a second and treat my dad and my family with a level of respect you could feel, but you never knew what was going to happen as soon as your back was turned.”
The second reason you heard for them passing was that Dell Curry informed the Wolves he did not want his son in Minnesota. Dell has confirmed this publicly several times over the years, so they were not wrong. The only problem with that theory is that Ricky Rubio’s camp made it pretty clear in the run-up that they would have much preferred to have him in New York rather than Minnesota as well, and the Wolves were so enamored with him that they just took him and held firm that he would eventually play here. Kahn did a very good job on that front, being patient and waiting two years for Rubio to come over, teaming with (assistant GM) Tony Ronzone to recruit him even after he was drafted, meet the family and assure them that Ricky would do well in Minnesota. They played it beautifully, which means they could have done the same thing with Steph, if they really believed he was a future star.
The second reason you heard for them passing was that Dell Curry informed the Wolves he did not want his son in Minnesota. Dell has confirmed this publicly several times over the years, so they were not wrong. The only problem with that theory is that Ricky Rubio’s camp made it pretty clear in the run-up that they would have much preferred to have him in New York rather than Minnesota as well, and the Wolves were so enamored with him that they just took him and held firm that he would eventually play here. Kahn did a very good job on that front, being patient and waiting two years for Rubio to come over, teaming with (assistant GM) Tony Ronzone to recruit him even after he was drafted, meet the family and assure them that Ricky would do well in Minnesota. They played it beautifully, which means they could have done the same thing with Steph, if they really believed he was a future star.
“I think Mitch is going to use the cap space wisely,” Curry said. “I don’t think he is going to fall in that scenario like we are just getting out of, where you signed a lot of guys, used up the cap space and then the team didn’t get better. So he’s done a fabulous job of drafting and getting guys off the free-agent market. So I look for him to be kind of conservative because you still, I think, are in the development mode as far as players and you don’t want to overpay guys to win five, 10 extra games. I think you want to continue to let the young guys develop, and then when it comes time to get that guy that moves the needle that you make sure you have the cap space to do that.”
As for the Hornets’ biggest needs whenever this offseason kicks in, Curry agreed with Kupchak’s assessment from February. An athletic big man and a wing player who can shoot and get to the basket should sit atop their wish list. “I think both of those things,” Curry said. “The guy in the middle that can protect the paint, protect the rim and give you a little bit on the offensive glass. But also a wing scorer as well. I don’t know who that is. You have to wait, again, and let the free agency shake out and see what’s left. But I think those are the two areas that you can improve your team, but also, again, it won’t set back the development of the young guys.”
Knowing the seriousness and understanding how COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, has taken the lives of thousands of Americans in less than a month, Curry decided it was prudent to be checked out and find out what was wrong. “I went to get tested Tuesday — they wouldn’t do it,” Curry said. “I didn’t have enough symptoms. That Wednesday, I’ve got a temperature. I mean I’ve got it all. I’ve got no energy. I get tested. They finally test me on March 25th. So in the meantime, it’s so bad I go to the ER one night. So I don’t get my tests back until I’m feeling better. They gave me a Zithromax, like a z-pack. I immediately started to get better. Looking back at it, that’s how I knew I didn’t have it.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
“He wants to go into the Hall of Fame along with Steph. That’s how close he feels to him and how honored he is to play with him. They have formed a special bond. That’s why I told him, I said,’Even though you’re going to probably miss this year, you and Steph will still have eight years together as long as you take care of your bodies.'”
“Anytime you have a major surgery like that, even with a hand, he’s doing the best he can,” said Dell Curry, now a television color commentator for the Charlotte Hornets. “It was a tough, tough injury, but he’s doing the best he can. Three to four months, not sure when he is going to come back. Has to take his time and come back with it. … He’s been through injuries before with the ankle. He understands the rehab that it takes to get through it. He knows about injuries and what goes through that. He’s got to be patient and make sure he is fully healthy before he comes back.”
Saturday night was a big night for the Curry family — specifically Seth Curry. Seth married girlfriend Callie Rivers, bringing together two of the more prominent NBA families. Seth, who signed with the Dallas Mavericks this offseason, is the son of former NBA veteran Dell Curry and the brother of two-time league MVP Steph Curry. Callie is the daughter of former NBA player and current Clippers coach Doc Rivers and sister of Houston Rockets guard Austin Rivers.
Video of hecklers screaming at Stephen Curry’s parents surfaced on Twitter, creating more social media backlash at a Raptors fanbase that already took a hit for its reaction to Kevin Durant’s injury. The clip posted by The Render on Tuesday afternoon shows Sonya and Dell Curry exiting a van at the entrance of the team hotel to shouts of profanity from a group gathered at the St. Regis in downtown Toronto. Sonya Curry rises from her seat and points toward the crowd, yelling back as she and Dell, a former Raptors player, make their way to the entrance. One man calls out to Dell, saying, “Dell, you’re the best, Dell! Don’t even listen to these guys.”
“We told Minnesota that Steph didn’t want to go there,” said Dell Curry in an interview with The Republic back in 2016. “We had no idea that they had agreed to a trade. Obviously, they couldn’t put that out. I remember (then-Suns general manager) Steve Kerr calling me (the next morning) and saying, ‘Don’t go to the press conference. We have a trade that they reneged on.’ I’m like, ‘That’s between you guys. We’re going wherever they tell us. We can’t not go.’”
The hope in the Curry camp was that he would fall to the New York Knicks at No. 8. As the draft went on, the only team in the way of that happening was the Warriors, whose head coach at the time, Don Nelson, loved the Davidson sharpshooter and wanted to take him at No. 7. As the Warriors’ pick approached, Nelson reached out to Steph’s father, Dell Curry, whose opinion was valued as a 16-year NBA vet, to ask his thoughts about Golden State drafting his son. Dell wasn’t having it. “Don’t,” Dell recalled telling Nelson. “You asked me the question, I’ll tell you the truth. Don’t [draft him].”
The Raptors surely did not expect Jones and Snow to have the shooting nights that they had. Still, they had a chance to win. Just inside of the final minute, Carter set up Curry for a 3-pointer to put the Raptors within one, and the 76ers missed two chances to extend their lead, although they did manage to eat 50 total seconds off the shot clock because of an offensive rebound. After McKie took the 76ers’ final non-shooting foul, the Raptors had two seconds to make a play. With Curry, guarded by Snow, inbounding, Peterson set a screen on McKie, who was on Carter. Carter then came around on a curl. As the 76ers were switching everything, Hill left Peterson to chase Carter. Snow: When (the shot) got up I was like, ‘How did he get the ball?’ I was thinking, ‘How did he get it, out of all people?’ I was guarding Dell Curry if I remember right. I was just like, ‘I’m not letting him get the ball.’ So I was thinking, ‘How did he get the ball? Why does he have the ball?’
Video of the joyous grin plastered over Dell Curry’s face as he held his grandson in his arms while Steph Curry warmed up was shown on the local news. Dell Curry was going gaga over Canon, turning into a big pile of goo around the latest member of the family, before sliding into his chair as the Hornets’ color analyst on the Fox Sports Southeast broadcasts. “It’s always special,” Steph Curry told The Athletic. “I never take it for granted, the fact that I’m able to play basketball at this level and have my dad still a part of the league. It’s still surreal, to be honest. I try to have as much fun with it as possible and enjoy a night like tonight, when my daughters have been to the game and hung out with my dad and kind of know a little bit about his career, and what he does. But to have my son out here tonight for the first time, three generations of Curry boys is pretty special. So me and my brother, my sister are a part of the league in some way shape or form is crazy.”
There’s nothing he wants more than to have Dell in the vicinity, allowing them to see each other much more often and hit the links whenever they can. But he’s not holding his breath, understanding his father’s ties to the city run deep. Prying him away and getting him to move 2,700-plus miles to the West is about as challenging as finding a Bay Area freeway that’s not jam-packed with bumper-to-bumper traffic. “Charlotte means so much to my family,” Curry said. “Yeah, I know it’s going to take a lot. He’s been almost 31 years, in terms of the legacy he created and how he’s still representing Charlotte behind the mic now. Yeah, I know he wants to do it as long as he can.”
Lou Williams said it best after becoming the NBA’s career leader in points off the bench. “Any time you can say of all time next to your name, it’s special,” he said. The 13-year guard scored 34 points to pass Dell Curry as the Los Angeles Clippers routed the Boston Celtics 140-115 on Monday night for their fifth straight win. Williams came into the game needing 28 points to pass Curry, who had 11,147 bench points. He surpassed Curry with 9:53 remaining in the fourth quarter with a driving layup.
Nearly two years ago, Stephen Curry and his team at Under Armour ventured out to Charlotte, North Carolina, in early July. The group was celebrating Curry’s new five-year supermax contract with the Golden State Warriors, who had just won their second championship in three years. Dell Curry, Stephen’s father and a 16-year NBA veteran, was hosting a low-key gathering at the family’s house for relatives, basketball associates who have followed Stephen’s much-chronicled rise, and his team from Under Armour. During that trip, the team began to lay out plans for All-Star Weekend 2019, which — after a two-year delay — was headed for Charlotte. Rooftop venues were scouted. Event spaces and potential modern lofty gallery layouts were considered. Under Armour eventually sent a handful of team members from Baltimore to further dive into the city’s history and begin mapping out its All-Star parties and other arrangements.
1 year ago via ESPN
“I’m going to do whatever I can to highlight, like showcase the city,” Curry said after Tuesday’s shootaround, in advance of Golden State’s game against the Utah Jazz. “And celebrate it for what it meant to me and my journey. Our family and my dad, in terms of where he is in all the record books of Charlotte — Kemba [Walker] just passed him I think for all-time scoring — but he has other records that talks about his longevity there.”
1 year ago via ESPN
“There’s always sort of an unofficial host of All-Star Weekend,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr recently told ESPN. “Usually it’s one of the guys playing for the local team, but this one is — the roots are so much stronger. It’s almost like the whole Curry family is hosting the All-Star Game. With Seth being in the 3-point shootout and Dell being a legend there.”
1 year ago via ESPN
Long before he could influence a generation of basketball players, Stephen Curry was a scrawny 15-year-old with a flawed jump shot. In the summer of 2003, Curry had just finished his freshman year at Charlotte Christian High School, where he played basketball for the junior varsity team. Making shots was never an issue for Curry, even though he checked in at 5-foot-6 and 130 pounds. But his historic stroke looked more like he was shooting a heavy medicine ball, with the ball being pushed from around his chin. Dell Curry, who had just retired after 16 seasons in the NBA, knew his son would have to raise the low release of his jumper to get it over the longer athletes he’d face as he rose through the ranks and, ultimately, to have a shot at following in his dad’s footsteps in the pros. “Imagine the amount of space required to get a shot off from that low,” Dell Curry told me over the phone in early February. “Middle school, he was fine. JV, he was fine. The competition was getting tougher. It was time for a change.”
Curry, 30, acknowledged before the game how much his ascension on the list means to him as he passes each name. Once Friday’s action ended, he said he took the game ball with him and was hopeful he could get it signed by Reggie Miller and Ray Allen, the only two players currently in front of him on the list. “It’s just a special accomplishment,” Curry said. “In terms of two guys that I know are trendsetters in stretching the imagination of the 3-point game. Doing it for many, many, many years, and people that I looked up to as a young kid playing the game. Obviously with my dad [Dell Curry] sparked a love of shooting the basketball — to look up on the list and obviously I want to catch them and put together many more years at this pace. Just knowing those two guys are right in front of me, it’s a special moment, for sure. “Because I respect the game, I respect what guys have done before, and those two guys — those are guys I looked up to.”
2 years ago via ESPN
But Curry isn’t pondering his father’s heyday; he’s thinking about its end — a closing act that played out in NBA arenas in Milwaukee, Charlotte and Toronto, the final stops in Dell’s career. Dell’s 6-foot-4 frame once glided through the schedule; then, in his mid-to-late 30s, it betrayed him. Years prior, he hadn’t iced his joints unless something truly hurt; later, those joints hurt almost daily. His ankles. His knees. His back — oh, his back. The first time his back began to act up, Dell stepped onto the court before a game and felt tightness. Thirty minutes later, the veteran shooting guard couldn’t walk. … After games, he’d wrap his knees and ankles in ice and sit there for so long that his wife often complained that he’d be the last one to leave. Steph, first as a young boy, then as a teenager, saw it all from the locker room — how much work it took his father just to be able to play a game and how difficult it was to recover afterward. “I got to see Father Time take over,” Curry says now.
2 years ago via ESPN
The Charlotte Hornets today unveiled additional plans for the celebration of the 30th Anniversary of the inaugural 1988-89 Hornets season during the 2018-19 NBA campaign and announced a deal with Spectrum to serve as presenting partner of the season-long commemoration. Hornets legend Muggsy Bogues has joined the organization as a Hornets Ambassador, alongside current Hornets Ambassador and FOX Sports Southeast analyst Dell Curry. Curry and Bogues were both selected by the Hornets in the 1988 NBA Expansion Draft and remain the two longest-tenured players in franchise history with 701 games and 632 games played, respectively.
On Wednesday night, he took another step in his impressive, if not unlikely career, passing Dell Curry to become the franchise’s career scoring leader with 9,841 points. “It’s super special because of all of the doubt I’ve gotten throughout my career and all of the criticism, but I just continue to prove them wrong,” Walker said. The emotions boiled over for Walker after he made a reverse layup with 20 seconds left in a 118-105 loss to the Cleveland Cavaliers to break the record Curry held for 26 years.