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Etan Thomas
Etan Thomas
Position: -
Born: 04/01/78
Height: 6-10 / 2.08
Weight:259 lbs. / 117.9 kg.
Earnings: $44,671,228 ($57,108,716*)
Etan Thomas: I didn’t want to touch on any of this. I even tweeted that I was going to mind my business on this. However, since Kwame Brown posted that first video on his IG account (plus additional videos on IG Live and his YouTube page “Bust Life”), there have been multiple media outlets that have reached out to me to inquire if I would come on their show. They want me to get in the middle of what was going on with Kwame and Stephen Jackson and Matt Barnes, and my answer has consistently been an adamant, “No.” I told them that they were not going to use me to fan the flames of this beef. When I first caught wind of it, I immediately tweeted that I hated seeing good Brothas beef to this level over something that could’ve (and should’ve) been fixed with a phone call, and I still stand by that.
Etan Thomas: I also have a lot of respect for all of them. I am still amazed at all of the work that Stephen Jackson has done around the world after George Floyd was murdered. I’ve interviewed both Stak and Matt for my show, “The Rematch,” and for my new book on white supremacy and police brutality that I’m currently putting the finishing touches on (shout out to Haymarket Books). Kwame and I have been friends since we were teammates with the Washington Wizards for four seasons, so I have always been in his corner. I immediately ordered some shirts from his clothing line for me and my son. (We got “Momma’s Cooking” and “My Momma’s Son” shirts).
Etan Thomas: Listen, I love what y’all are doing, you and Stak. I love the fact that y’all have gone into this area of media. For me, I didn’t really like the media when I was playing and I feel kinda similar with y’all but y’all are doing it differently to give guys an opportunity. So, I love it. I love what y’all are doing. Matt Barnes: I appreciate it. As athletes, we always thought there was some sort of motive. There was a handful of people that you kind of trusted, but for the most part, you had to watch yourself with the media. That’s something Jack and I are trying to change, obviously. We’ve experienced pretty much everything that our guests have experienced and that gives us an easier intro and a different approach, which allows most of our guests to really let their wall down and feel comfortable speaking to us.
Thomas: What I want to talk about is not really a whole lot with basketball, it’s other stuff. So, you’ve been doing a lot with using your voice and platform, in particular after Stephon Clark’s murder. Now, you didn’t know him personally, but it hit home for you because it was in your hometown of Sacramento. First, let’s remind everybody of what happened with the case. Matt Barnes: Yeah, I mean basically there was some calls about someone breaking into cars and Stephon happened to be out, they chased him down into his grandmother’s backyard and shot him several times. I think there were six to eight shots in his back, but I don’t know how many rounds they let go. And like 99% of the cases in the United States the cops were not held responsible for the situation. I had happened to just be watching CNN that morning in my room with my twins and they heard Sacramento, so I was watching it and they were playing on their iPads, they heard Sacramento so they started paying attention and was like dad, did you know him? I’m like ‘Nah I didn’t know him,’ and they were kind of just confused and their confusion and hurt is what really made me kind of want to be like ‘Let me see if there’s something that I can do to show my kids that there’s ways to help in situations like this.’
NBA: “Generational trauma has reverberated through my family’s history.” Descended from survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, Dr. @TiffanyCrutcher draws the connection between Tulsa’s history and the 2016 murder of her brother Terence. #BHM Virtual Teach-in – 12pm/et on @NBA