Gary Payton Rumors

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Gary Payton
Gary Payton
Position: -
Born: 07/23/68
Height: 6-4 / 1.93
Weight:179 lbs. / 81.6 kg.
Earnings: $104,367,619 ($160,268,025*)
One of Gary Payton’s most popular Nike signature basketball models, the Air Zoom Flight The Glove, is set to return to retailers this year but with a twist. The leaked images provided by solebyjc reveal slight modifications to the shoe’s latest reissue including a new translucent mesh shroud on the upper, but the green Monkey Paw tech by the heel and Swoosh branding across the midfoot remains intact. Completing the package are Zoom Air units encapsulated in the midsole for cushioning.
Kareem Rush on how hard it was to adapt to the Triangle Offense for Gary Payton and Karl Malone: “I think if he would’ve had more than a year to run it. Because that takes time. That stuff is drilled. Gary’s coming in towards the tail end of his career and he’s used to playing a certain way so you’re transitioning to a Triangle Offense and was definitely probably a learning curve for him. He like everybody else when they learn something new, it’s just going to take time and to figure his way out, to working with Shaq and Kobe as well as Malone you know, everybody needs an adjustment period. So he didn’t have the best year, I don’t think that he’ll tell you the same thing, but he was still was an integral part in what we did to get to where we were going. Hall of Fame guy. But yeah, the Triangle Offense is something that’s not easy to pick up.”
Here’s what Gary Payton had to say about Jordan dismissing him on “The Opinionated 7-footers” podcast with Ryan Hollins and Brendan Haywood (via Andrew Joseph of For The Win): “Oh you know I was hot. I was thinking about calling him at the time. … But you know what, that’s what I expect out of Mike because I would’ve said the same thing. I would’ve said the same thing. You know me, B. I’m not gonna admit to nothing, man. I’m not gonna admit to somebody that D’d me up or did nothing. I’ll always tell you that any time in my career, nobody gave me problems but one person, and that’s John Stockton to me. That is just the way the game goes. I’m not mad at Mike because Mike didn’t have too many games that nobody D’d him up.”
Storyline: Michael Jordan Documentary
Speaking on The Opinionated Podcast, Payton said he nearly rang His Airness up to give him a piece of his mind but realized he would have probably behaved the same way if it were him. “Oh you know I was hot! I was thinking about calling him at the time!” he declared. “But you know what, that’s what I expect out of Mike, because I would have said the same thing. I’m not going to admit to nothing, I’m not going to admit to someone that D’d me up. I will always tell you at any time in my career, nobody gave me problems but one person and that’s John Stockton to me. So you know that is just the way the game goes.
Storyline: Michael Jordan Documentary
“I’m not mad at Mike, because Mike didn’t have too many games that somebody D’d him up. He always was dominant but I think me and [Pistons point guard] Joe Dumars were a thorn in his side, I really do think that. And I’m glad he said that because I wouldn’t expect nothing else from him. I don’t expect nothing else from Michael Jordan. Michael Jordan is Michael Jordan, that’s why we talk about him, that’s why we see a 10-week, Last Dance on him, because that’s just the way it is. “He is the guy that we’re all talking about as the greatest basketball player that ever played and that’s fine and I don’t expect nothing less from him.”
When Hall of Fame center Shaquille O’Neal joined the Miami Heat, he didn’t exactly get along with head coach Pat Riley. O’Neal and Hall of Fame guard Gary Payton shared a story about one of O’Neal and Riley’s fights on “NBA Inside Stuff” Sunday night. The Zoom call featured some of basketball’s biggest names sharing old stories from their playing days. “I had a fight with Pat Riley,” O’Neal said. “Gary Payton had to grab me from choking Pat Riley.”
Tim Hardaway (5x NBA All-Star): I was there for about a week. We played every day. You had Chris Mullin, Rod Strickland out there. Gary Payton, of course. Reggie, Pat, Charles [Barkley]. Charles needed it because you know, he’s always getting heavy during the course of the summer. He really needed to be in shape and ready to go. He loved it. Charles would be going at people. We had to go double team him because basically when he got it down low, nobody could stop him. If you didn’t want to lose, you had to go down there and double team. Basketball stars weren’t the only ones flocking to the Jordan Dome. There was even a celebrity row.
2 months ago via SLAM
“Michael Jordan is No. 1,” Conley said. “His competitive nature, that’s the one thing I try to bring every night.” In a later response to a question about his favorite players growing up, Conley said he was a huge Seattle SuperSonics fan and in turn a big fan of Gary Payton, who spent 13 years with the Sonics. He also again mentioned Jordan along with Isiah Thomas.
The entire NBA landscape changed back in the summer of 2003 when perennial All-Stars Gary Payton and Karl Malone teamed up and joined the Los Angeles Lakers in free agency. Although the unexpected move did leave a lot of jaws on the floor, Payton recently revealed that it was planned all along. While serving as a guest in the latest episode of the All The Smoke podcast with Stephen Jackson and Matt Barnes, Payton shared that he and Malone have discussed playing with each other long before moving to Hollywood. “Well, you know man, it was a lot different. And the way we got to LA is because me and Karl had planned already to play with each other. We had been talking ’bout that for two all-star (games). And we said we knew that we wasn’t gonna be with our same teams for a long period of time because our owners was a little bit different, and they were trying to stay away from us a little bit. They wanted to go young. So he always told me we gonna play together,” “The Glove shared.
Still in search of that elusive Larry O’Brien trophy, the pair pounced on the opportunity to join the Lakers who were led by the fearsome duo of Shaquille O’Neal and Kobe Bryant at the time. “So, when we became free agents and then, all of a sudden, Magic, started calling us and saying that the Lakers want us, they want us, they want us,” Payton continued. “And then, all of a sudden, Karl called me and said, ‘you know I want to go to L.A., I want to get sun. I want to get out of this coldness, I want to get out of all this crap. Let’s enjoy ourselves at the end of our careers and do what we do. We could sign here for 2 years and then re-up and then end our career here, and it will be fun.’ He said, ‘I’ll take the less money, you take the big money.’ And that’s what we did.”
Gary Payton, a Hall of Famer and a Finals rival of Jordan with the Seattle SuperSonics, thought he’d sent Michael a message in a preseason meeting during Payton’s rookie year in 1990: “I went at him in the preseason and he didn’t forget it,” Payton said. “We played him for the first time in the regular season. He walked on the court, and I was talking mad, crazy. He only played like 8, 9, 10 minutes in the preseason game, and he went over and told B.J. Armstrong and Pippen, ‘I got the rook. I got him all night.’ He got me in foul trouble real quick. I sat down, he played like 10 minutes of the game, he had like 35 points. He walked over and said, ‘Young fella, preseason ain’t what’s happening. This is what’s up.’ It was like, welcome to the NBA and many more.” (While Jordan scored 33 points that night, in 27 minutes, Payton mustered just two. At least he made the only shot he took.)
Gary Payton: “I went at him in the preseason and he didn’t forget it,” Payton said. “We played him for the first time in the regular season. He walked on the court, and I was talking mad, crazy. He only played like 8, 9, 10 minutes in the preseason game, and he went over and told B.J. Armstrong and Pippen, ‘I got the rook. I got him all night.’ He got me in foul trouble real quick. I sat down, he played like 10 minutes of the game, he had like 35 points. He walked over and said, ‘Young fella, preseason ain’t what’s happening. This is what’s up.’ It was like, welcome to the NBA and many more.” (While Jordan scored 33 points that night, in 27 minutes, Payton mustered just two. At least he made the only shot he took.)
Former NBA star Gary Payton was in a pay-it-forward mood this weekend — he brought a bunch of good food to the hardworking first responders in his own hometown. The ex-SuperSonics PG strolled into Alta Bates Summit Medical Campus Saturday, which is in Oakland — his stomping ground. We’re told he came bearing gifts of the edible kind … a crap ton of barbecue sandwiches and sides from local restaurant Kinder’s Meats & Deli. And, don’t worry, Gary had more than enough to feed everyone … and we mean just about every person on the hospital’s payroll, including the often-forgotten security guards who are stationed at hospitals. All in all, we’re told GP had enough grub to feed about 200 workers.
Former NBA star Gary Payton was in a pay-it-forward mood this weekend — he brought a bunch of good food to the hardworking first responders in his own hometown. The ex-SuperSonics PG strolled into Alta Bates Summit Medical Campus Saturday, which is in Oakland — his stomping ground. We’re told he came bearing gifts of the edible kind … a crap ton of barbecue sandwiches and sides from local restaurant Kinder’s Meats & Deli. And, don’t worry, Gary had more than enough to feed everyone … and we mean just about every person on the hospital’s payroll, including the often-forgotten security guards who are stationed at hospitals. All in all, we’re told GP had enough grub to feed about 200 workers.
Fred Katz: John Wall and Gary Payton II among Wizards helping out at a scrimmage between the DC special Olympics team and the Virginia one. Wall and Payton reffing. Troy Brown, Thomas Bryant, Ish Smith and Moe Wagner coaching. Scott Brooks and Tommy Sheppard in attendance, too.

Barrett said he’ll be off to “sunny Florida” Saturday afternoon to unwind after a hectic first half to the Knicks’ season. But first he wants to soak in the All-Star vibes. “I want to pick people’s brains,’’ Barrett said. “There’s a lot of stars here. It’s chance to talk to them and see what they do and apply it to my life. I saw Gary Payton last night. He was cool and spoke to us and told us how hard he worked and told us to ask questions. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. People have a lot of knowledge.’’
Gary Payton: The younger guys always say, “Well, in your era, you guys couldn’t do this or that.” If that’s the case, I wish you could come to our era and play in our era. I wish we had a time machine so that we could put them in our era and see how they would fare. Sometimes, they say, “Well, you couldn’t play in this era because of the shooting and scoring!” Well, when we were in our early 20s, we were pretty athletic and dominant too; that’s why you know about us. It’s just changed. You can’t put your hands on guys. The league is about scoring; they want you to score and they want to run up the points, so it’s entertaining. In our era, we were talking about locking guys down. We were talking about beating you up. We were talking about putting you on your back if you tried to come in the paint and dunk. We wanted you to think that you may get hurt every time you came in the paint. You know what I’m saying? Now, that will get you a flagrant or get you kicked out of the game and they may even suspend you after evaluating it. We didn’t have all of that. We’d put you on your back, they’d look at it and then you’d go on about your business. It’s just so different.
Storyline: Old School vs. New School
Are there any current NBA players who remind you of yourself in terms of their game or tenacity? You mentioned Patrick Beverley, so I’m guessing he’s one. Gary Payton: There are two: Marcus Smart and Patrick Beverley. They both remind me of myself. They’ll go at you. Beverley is a little bit different because he doesn’t have the offensive game that I had. But Marcus is starting to become that kind of player – he’s starting to score and shoot the ball. But both of them are dogs on the defensive end. My son, [Gary Payton II], has a little of that in him and he’s doing the same thing. He can get at you when he wants to and he’s long for someone who’s 6-foot-3, so his length will hurt you too. When you have them type of guys who can play defense that type of way, it’s always a bonus for their team. When you have a guy who can lock down like that, he’s always giving you great stuff on that end. But can they give you something on the other end? All three of them need to work on their offense
Gary Payton: I pressed my son too much. He was around basketball all the time and he got pressed a lot. It’s one of those things where you can steer your son away from loving the game of basketball. My son stopped liking it [when he was young]. As of today, he listens… but he don’t listen. It’s gotta come from somebody else. Then, when they don’t make it and they aren’t productive like they want to be, you want to go say, “See, what did I tell you? Why don’t you want to listen to me?” But that’s not the right thing to do. So I’ve backed off from my son. When he calls me, if he calls me, I’ll say what I say and then leave it alone. I won’t even go into it anymore. Now that he’s got his guaranteed contract for the first time and he’s staying up, I told him, “You should’ve been doing this since day one.” But they always got excuses. This is a different era and they always got excuses, man. “They should’ve let me play!” or, “They let me play, but [they should’ve] let me do this or that!” It’s not about all that. It’s about seeing what the coach wants and doing it, doing what the organization wants. But, nowadays, I just let him do what he gotta do and however he wants to do it.
Speaking of Seattle, what would it mean for you to stand in Key Arena and have your jersey retired in front of those fans at some point in the future? Gary Payton: It would mean a lot to me. Those fans really were the ones who made everything happen for me. I was there for 13 seasons and that’s where I became a Hall of Famer. And the fans deserve it. I think they deserve to see that happen, just like they deserve to see Shawn Kemp’s jersey raised up and Detlef Schrempf’s jersey raised up – not just mine. You know what I’m saying? It would be great for those fans to see that and feel that because I know they’d go crazy, and it would be a great moment for myself too. I hope that we have an opportunity to do that. I do think it will come. I think basketball will get back to Seattle.
Payton, an analyst for ‘The Warmup” on NBA TV, knows Russell fairly well. He’ll tell you that greatest Celtic isn’t too impressed by too many things — not even the ring ceremony. “Afterward, I went and sat next to him, and Bill was acting like nothing was happening … He was on his phone, playing solitaire. That’s Bill, you know what I’m sayin’?”
It’s important to Payton that Russell and all the members of his generation get their due. “I always tell kids, and people in this generation, I don’t care what you think about your game, you’re game ain’t like that. Your game ain’t start like that. People came before that paved the way for what you’re doing. Get up. If you see Dr. J, if you see Bill Russell … all these dudes, man, if you see these types of guys, man, Jerry West, man, get up and shake their hand and tell them, ‘Hello. How’re you doin’? I’ve idolized you.’ And even if you don’t, go YouTube ’em.”
He currently ranks 10th with 8,879 assists, but he will soon surpass Gary Payton (8,966), Isiah Thomas (9,061) and perhaps even Chris Paul (9,290) this season. Assuming he maintains his season average of 11 per game, James should top Payton and Thomas at some point in the middle of this season. Paul, who is currently with the Oklahoma City Thunder in his 15th season, has stayed healthy and productive thus far. Considering Paul’s extensive injury history though, James could make up enough ground to climb ahead of his close friend either late this season or early next season. James should also eclipse Oscar Robertson (9,887 assists) next season and Magic Johnson (10,141), Mark Jackson (10,334) and Steve Nash (10,335) in two years. It seems like a stretch James could surpass Jason Kidd (12,091) and John Stockton (15,806). “I’ve been fortunate to be able to play with great teammates and great coaches in three great organizations so far in my career,” James said. “I just hope I make anyone who has followed my career proud.”
Justin Kubatko: The @Indiana Pacers Malcolm Brogdon is the fifth player since the ABA-NBA merger to record at least 15 points and 10 assists in each of his first four games of a season. He joins: * Magic Johnson (1988-89) * Gary Payton (2000-01) * Steve Nash (2006-07) * Chris Paul (2008-09, 2013-14) pic.twitter.com/0GpQqPQU4W
As Seattle finalized a plan for a Key Arena remodel with the potential to bring a men’s NBA team back to Seattle, the Bellevue estate that former Seattle Supersonics point guard Gary Payton bought in 1997 came on the market. While it’s been out of Payton’s hands since 2011, very little has changed between then and now, aside from the addition of a pool house. One relic of the NBA All-Star Team alum’s time on the property is a party pad in the main house dubbed “Payton’s Place.” First, to answer what’s likely an obvious question: Yes, the listing includes photos of Payton’s former basketball court, emblazoned with his initials on the sidelines. In fact, the well-manicured three acre grounds include a few different sports courts, plus a putting green, a pool, a hot tub, a wraparound patio, a waterfall, and lawns for relaxing after a game of one-on-one—and that’s just the outside.
The party doesn’t stop inside Payton’s Place, though—a high-ceilinged den with yet another fireplace opens to an outdoor bar and grill, lined in brick, brings it all outside, complete with a TV for outdoor viewing. Upstairs, find several bedrooms with their own amenities, including a master with a descending TV, and a second, more informal kitchen and dining area that’s still larger than many houses have. This piece of b-ball history is on the market for $6.7 million.