Georges Niang Rumors

All NBA Players
#31
Georges Niang
Georges Niang
Position: F
Born: 06/17/93
Height: 6-7 / 2.01
Weight:230 lbs. / 104.3 kg.
Salary: $1,783,557
Mike Conley noticed a flock of geese in the distance, but didn’t think much of it. Delta flight 8944 took off from runway 35 on the east side of the airport. Just 10 minutes into the climb—before the comfort of cruising altitude: BANG, BANG, BANG. “What the f— was that? What just hit the plane?” Georges Niang said to Joe Ingles, in the next seat. Turbulence doesn’t sound like that. Niang’s brain scrambled to make any sense of it. What sounded like that? His initial thought: a rocket.
Panic ensued. The plane tipped back and forth trying to stabilize itself. Players shouted out in horror. Niang gripped the armrests in his aisle seat and looked out the window over Ingles’ shoulder. Niang’s stomach churned as the plane surged up and down, up and down. Niang peered out the window at the left engine. What the … “Look at that dent!” Niang yelled out. “No, no, no,” Ingles said. “Look at that hole.”
The plane took a hard left, bending toward the decimated engine. Niang thought: Are we going down? Across the Boeing 757-232, everyone grabbed phones to call loved ones. One problem: no service. WiFi hadn’t been flicked on because the plane hadn’t risen to 10,000 feet. Too high for phone service. Too low for WiFi. Niang’s teammates and staffers yelled desperately for the flight attendants to turn on WiFi. Niang thought about Ingles, who has a wife and young twins, a boy and a girl. Some players managed to reach loved ones through iMessage.
When the plane touched down, there was no applause. Niang remembers a wave of exhales. Niang called his mom, told her he was safe. He told her the whole story, and that he loved her. Then, her phone pinged as a delayed flood of text messages began to fill her inbox. A team meeting was being assembled. Niang was about to hang up with his mother. “Can you please get an iPhone already?” “We can work on that,” she told him.
And yet, the Utah Jazz are the best team in the NBA, at least three games above the rest of the league. “The thing that aggravates some of us was that people thought it wasn’t a big deal, hey, they were playing a few hours later. How hard could it be?” Niang says. “It was a big deal. But we made the sacrifice to get up and go play. Life is fragile and important but we also realize that we have a job to do.”