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Jamal Mashburn Rumors

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Jamal Mashburn
Jamal Mashburn
Position: -
Born: 11/29/72
Height: 6-8 / 2.03
Weight:246 lbs. / 112 kg.
Earnings: $75,623,634 ($112,198,300*)
The exhibition game between the Dream Team and a group of college studs ahead of the 1992 Barcelona Olympics has been heavily documented. Mashburn, who starred for Kentucky at that time, was part of the young crew of challengers hoping to give Bird, Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, etc. a competitive workout. But even before they stepped on the floor, words were already exchanged between Bird and Mashburn’s teammate, the late Rodney Rogers (via The Players’ Tribune). “We checked in at the Marriot go up to our floor and we’re walking in the corridor, and we see this tall white guy coming out the hall, ‘Man, that’s Larry Bird.’ He walked by us and he says, ‘Y’all those college guys?’ And we was like, ‘Yeah, yeah, yeah.’ And he looked at us and he said, ‘Get some f****** rest, it’s gonna be a long week’ and walked off.”
“Jay is very competitive,” Mashburn Sr. said. “He’s the type of kid that doesn’t run from anything. A part of his recruitment process, we were looking for the best competition in the best conference. That’s what the Big Ten and Minnesota offers.” Richard Pitino’s father, Rick, coached the elder Mashburn at Kentucky, but the new generation of this connection is making both sons excited as well.
In 2003-04, Davis attempted 8.7 3s per game — the most of anyone in NBA history until that point and a record that would stand until Steph Curry’s peak more than a decade later. The 582 3s Davis shot that season are still a New Orleans franchise record. Until that point, the most 3s Davis had ever attempted was 5.8 per game. His uptick in 2003-04 was the result of two things. That season, the Hornets shifted to a perimeter-oriented attack under first-year coach Tim Floyd. They also had minimal offensive firepower after Jamal Mashburn, the team’s leading scorer the previous season, had knee surgery, which limited him to 19 games. “It was strictly about what we had and trying to play to our strengths,” Floyd said. “And that’s what I felt like what our strength was at that time: Baron and his talents. When he was physically fit and in shape and healthy, he was arguably the greatest talent that I coached.”
It was not an especially efficient campaign for Davis. He converted 32.1% of his looks from 3, a middling mark. He attempted 10 or more 3s 29 times that season. In 12 of those games, he shot 25% or worse from behind the arc. Privately, some of his teammates grumbled that Davis was settling for jumpers when he could’ve been driving to the rim. Davis remembers it differently. “They were just stacking the defense and not letting me drive,” he said.