Jameer Nelson Rumors

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Jameer Nelson
Jameer Nelson
Position: -
Born: 02/09/82
Height: 6-0 / 1.83
Weight:190 lbs. / 86.2 kg.
Earnings: $72,802,422 ($82,343,937*)
The rules were simple and were part of the reason that he chose Wade: Morey could only select inactive players through the 2K draft, unless they currently play for the Rockets. So James Harden, shockingly rated at 79 overall, was certainly an option for Morey. And that’s exactly who he took to complement Wade in the backcourt. The Rockets are known for their distinctive small-ball style of play, and Morey took that same approach to the game, though the league had not yet reached that type of modernity yet. Shane Battier (former Rocket) was next, followed by the likes of Nikola Mirotic, Jameer Nelson and Marcus Camby.
Most influential NBA players on Frank Jackson growing up: “I loved watching Allen Iverson when I was younger and Rajon Rondo, when he was with the Celtics. And I think being in the league, the last three years, I think being around Jrue (Holiday) has been just so awesome, tremendously helped me. Same with Rondo. I wish I could have played with him (longer). Jameer Nelson was huge when he was with us. Honestly, I’ve been really fortunate. (Anthony Davis) was great with me. To be surrounded by such awesome guys, but obviously me and Jrue have been buddies since I got here and that’s my dog. He always looks out for me.”
Former teammate Jameer Nelson is one of many people who have witnessed West’s post-career distress and offered help. The National Basketball Players Association has maintained close contact with West and made itself available as a resource. His college coach at Saint Joseph, Phil Martelli, and West’s former player agent, Noah Croom, have been in communication with each other — and West — about providing him support. The same can be said for the Celtics and Mavericks. Both Boston GM Danny Ainge and Dallas owner Mark Cuban have been in direct contact at various points, according to those close to West.
Kyle Lowry continues to have those moments when he defies what’s expected of him, when he stuns those who underestimate his will, craftiness and get-it-done mentality. In his 14th season, Lowry is a leader of a Toronto Raptors squad experiencing the most unique title defense from an already unlikely champion. His longevity is a credit to his stubbornness and talent, but he also looks back to two summers spent with former NBA star Jameer Nelson that forever changed how he would approach his career. “Nobody knows this, but to this day, I thank Jameer for helping me get to where I am,” Lowry said in an interview with The Athletic. “Whenever he text me, I text him, I tell him, ‘You’re the reason I even understand how to work.’ ”
“It was always respect,” Lowry said of Nelson. “A guy like that, I’m going to do whatever he tells me to do because he knew what it took to get there. He was in his second, third year, showing me how to work, it was big. He allowed me to be a fly on the wall and that annoying little kid. It meant the world. It was cool, man.” Lowry spent time with Nelson at the conclusion of both of his seasons at Villanova, traveling down to Orlando for lessons and observations and returning to Philadelphia for training sessions at Villanova or St. Joseph’s, and weight lifting in the suburb of Bryn Mawr.
“Every day when we came in, it was about Dwight wanting to be traded and about Dwight wanting Stan to be fired and things like that,” Nelson said. “Everybody found anything but positive things to say to us. But I thought we handled it well. We still continued to win; we still played and we fought through it. But it was just a lot of weight on everybody’s shoulders. From the players to the coaching staff. It took a lot out of you, dealing with all of that negativity. A lot of things that happen in professional sports just need to stay in the locker room or in the office. Whether it’s with the general manager, the owner or the team president, if you want to have a conversation with that person, just let it stay there. If you want to request a trade, request it quietly. Then, things won’t trickle down to your coach, your teammates and your fans. It had an effect on everybody, the people working on the business side. Nobody was having any fun anymore. It was almost like the ending to a great movie, and it was a sad ending.”
“To put all of it on Dwight isn’t fair,” Nelson said. “To say, ‘If he would’ve stayed, things would’ve been the same…’ or, ‘He’s the reason why everything broke up,’ is not fair because there were other things that transpired as well. I’m sure there are certain things that we’ll probably never know. But I definitely would like to sit down and talk with him one day. And I’ve always rooted for him; I’ve been on his side and wanted to see him come out on top. But I’m definitely looking forward to that day when I get to sit down and talk with him and iron some things out.”
You can listen to the whole podcast here, but the most noteworthy takeaways happened when he discussed how he felt about Howard’s final season on the Magic in 2011-12 (via HoopsHype): “We had a culture and when that culture got broken, that’s when the team started to break up,’ Nelson said. “There were different reasons why the culture broke, but the main thing was certain guys weren’t seeing eye-to-eye anymore. The goal changed. Social media started coming into play. The brand started getting bigger for individual guys. Winning wasn’t even the priority at that time, in my opinion, for certain guys. It kind of got blown up because of that, in my opinion. I’m sure you’ve been around and you’ve seen it. But it kind of deflates you and you’re like: ‘Ugh, I don’t feel like coming to practice today because it’s not going to be as fun.’ Our practices used to be fun. When we were winning, everything was fun. But when things got a little tougher and adversity hit, certain guys just didn’t want to be there anymore.”
“Every day when we came in, it was about Dwight wanting to be traded and about Dwight wanting Stan [Van Gundy] to be fired and things like that,” Nelson said. “Everybody found anything but positive things to say to us. But I thought we handled it well. We still continued to win; we still played and we fought through it. But it was just a lot of weight on everybody’s shoulders. From the players to the coaching staff. It took a lot out of you, dealing with all of that negativity. A lot of things that happen in professional sports just need to stay in the locker room or in the office. Whether it’s with the general manager, the owner or the team president, if you want to have a conversation with that person, just let it stay there. If you want to request a trade, request it quietly. Then, things won’t trickle down to your coach, your teammates and your fans. It had an effect on everybody, [even] the people working on the business side. Nobody was having any fun anymore. It was almost like the ending to a great movie, and it was a sad ending.”
The former Orlando Magic point guard wants to find work in broadcasting, preferably as a color commentator. In June, he participated in the National Basketball Players Association’s Broadcaster U. program, a four-day crash course designed to prepare current and former players for a new career. Though he has not retired as a player and said he would consider playing again if a team expresses interest, the 37-year-old sounds ready for a new challenge.
Just as they had done numerous times before, past and present NBA players such as Shaquille O’Neal, Jameer Nelson and others, reached out to Magic CEO Alex Martins concerning Mr. DeVos. On Thursday, several contacted Martins and Magic leaders to pass along their condolences and fond memories about a man they considered to be, “the best owner in the NBA.’’ “You’d be amazed at how many players and former players I’ve already heard from today, including Shaq and Jameer and several others,’’ said Martins after announcing that DeVos – the Magic’s owner since 1991 – had died at his home in Ada, Mich.
Storyline: Magic Front Office
Jameer Nelson, the all-time leading scorer in the history of Saint Joseph’s basketball, will be among the nearly 2,200 graduating students at Saint Joseph’s University’s 167th commencement exercises on Saturday, May 19. Nelson will officially receive a Bachelor of Science in sociology during the undergraduate ceremony, 14 years after being selected in the first round of the NBA Draft. During Nelson’s time with the Hawks, the team reached the NCAA Tournament three times, culminating with a perfect 27-0 regular season and a run to the Elite Eight in 2003-04. Nelson was the consensus National Player of the Year that season, earning, among other accolades, the John R. Wooden Award and the Naismith College Player of the Year Award.