Jaylen Brown Rumors

All NBA Players
#7
Jaylen Brown
Jaylen Brown
Position: F
Born: 10/24/96
Height: 6-6 / 1.98
Weight:223 lbs. / 101.2 kg.
Salary: $6,534,829
Speaking on a separate call Monday, Boston Celtics guard Jaylen Brown had a few other suggestions that he wished the league would have allowed players to use. “There’s a lot of stuff. I know everybody has different reasons they’re playing for. … Four hundred and fifty guys, or however many will be there, are sending in whatever they feel like would add to that list and encompass the group that’s going down there,” Brown said. “What I’d like to personally see on there? Maybe ‘Break the Cycle,’ putting that on the back of your jersey. ‘Results,’ that’s what everybody is really playing for. ‘Inequality by Design,’ maybe. Things like that might have a deeper impact than some of the things that were given to us. I think it was a little bit limiting.”
Speaking on a separate call Monday, Boston Celtics guard Jaylen Brown had a few other suggestions that he wished the league would have allowed players to use. “There’s a lot of stuff. I know everybody has different reasons they’re playing for. … Four hundred and fifty guys, or however many will be there, are sending in whatever they feel like would add to that list and encompass the group that’s going down there,” Brown said. “What I’d like to personally see on there? Maybe ‘Break the Cycle,’ putting that on the back of your jersey. ‘Results,’ that’s what everybody is really playing for. ‘Inequality by Design,’ maybe. Things like that might have a deeper impact than some of the things that were given to us. I think it was a little bit limiting.”
“For me, I can speak for myself better than anybody, I want to make that clear: I didn’t want to go to Orlando,” Brown said Monday in a conference call with reporters. “Like, I had apprehensions not just because of social justice, but COVID-related, and had some family issues, as well. But, once I thought about the opportunity that the organization and the NBA presented to play for something bigger than myself, I would have signed up right away. “I plan on using my voice when I’m down there. I plan on inspiring and spreading light on things that are getting dimmed, and hopefully the NBA and our organization can understand.”
“The more the NBA understands that, the better everybody will feel about it, especially players. So I feel that us going down there and making sure nobody gets distracted is part of the initial correspondence. We have to go down there and make sure that people don’t forget about George Floyd or Breonna Taylor or Philando Castile or Ahmaud Arbery or Trayvon Martin, which is in the Orlando area. And the list goes on, and the countless other people who were not caught on video who experienced something similar. “The bottom line is there’s improvements that need to be made and the NBA has a great voice and a lot of resources and a lot of influence and we are appreciative they are helping in aiding in a lot of the things we care about. So that’s really important.”
In an appearance on an ESPN video with Ros Gold-Onwude, Brown revealed Garnett left a voicemail for him when he was a rookie in Boston in 2017. The former Celtics big man, who was out of the league at this point, spotted Brown looking down at one point in the season. Garnett didn’t mince words when it came to his opinion on Brown’s body language. “I was at the end of the bench with my head down, and he sent a voice message through my strength coach over the phone like, ‘You better pick your [expletive] head up,’ ” Brown said with a smile. “He was cursing me out. He was like, ‘You’ve got to carry yourself a certain way.’ So he told me to pick my head up and fix my body language, right the [expletive] now.”
In an appearance on an ESPN video with Ros Gold-Onwude, Brown revealed Garnett left a voicemail for him when he was a rookie in Boston in 2017. The former Celtics big man, who was out of the league at this point, spotted Brown looking down at one point in the season. Garnett didn’t mince words when it came to his opinion on Brown’s body language. “I was at the end of the bench with my head down, and he sent a voice message through my strength coach over the phone like, ‘You better pick your [expletive] head up,’ ” Brown said with a smile. “He was cursing me out. He was like, ‘You’ve got to carry yourself a certain way.’ So he told me to pick my head up and fix my body language, right the [expletive] now.”
On a recent video interview with ESPN’s Ros Gold-Onwude, Brown said Garnett gave him some advice as a rookie when he saw Brown hanging his head at the end of the bench. “I was at the end of the bench with my head down, and he sent a voice message through my strength coach over the phone like, ‘You better pick your mother(expletive) head up,‘” Brown said, smiling. “He was cursing me out. He was like, ‘You’ve got to carry yourself a certain way.’ So he told me to pick my head up and fix my body language, right the (expletive) now.”
Brown said Garnett’s intensity inspires him, even though he doesn’t always embody it at this point. “(He’s) somebody I’m chasing here in Boston, he was the last person to win a championship,” Brown said. “That’s something I would like to do while I’m here with the Celtics. I’m definitely inspired by Kevin Garnett. I think we’re totally two different people, we play two different positions, but I would like to model my approach after his, and hopefully we will down the road be looked at as similar.”
“Maybe it’ll be a max deal with certain likely bonuses – some fairly attainable incentives in there – but I think it’ll be a max deal. If that ends up being below the max, I’d be very, very surprised.” ESPN analyst Bobby Marks, who worked in NBA front offices for 20 years, agreed with the general manager. “I think they’ll give him a blank check,” Marks said with a laugh. “He’s one of those guys where you go with the blank-check approach. I think Tatum and Donovan Mitchell can basically dictate what salary they want. I think we saw with the extension that Boston gave Jaylen Brown, which wasn’t the full max, they gave themselves a little bit of cap flexibility because they knew that Jayson’s was coming up next. But, yeah, I think it’s a no-brainer. I doubt we’re going to see Boston come in with a low-ball number. (laughs)”
Jaylen Brown has made his fellow Celtics proud, including head coach Brad Stevens and owner Wyc Grousbeck. On Saturday, Grousbeck talked to WBZ-TV’s Dan Roche about the “special person” Brown is. “Since day one when I met Jaylen, back in (2015), it was so obvious that he’s just special – a special person with special character,” Grousbeck told Roche. “He has educated me, to be perfectly honest. I’ve spent time talking with him and a couple other players in-depth over the last few days because I’ve realized I have a lot to learn, that I thought I knew and I didn’t know, just to be honest.”
But after Celtics star Jaylen Brown mentioned he’d be driving down in a group text, Brogdon reached out. He was nervous at first, but then it came into perspective. “It was sorta impromptu, and it ended up being very powerful,” Brogdon said. “It’s one of those things where you don’t know what a protest, you don’t know what a march feels like until you’re a part of it. It’s one of those things that can be scary, it’s one of those things right now, you see so many people on TV getting injured and having all the trouble with police, and it can be problematic for sure if it gets out of hand. But the way that was handled, the way it went, it definitely was something that was empowering.”
Malcolm Brogdon: A restless energy has consumed me for the past week, and initially I couldn’t figure out how to relieve it. I’ve witnessed protests over the past decade for Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown and all the other people suffering from excessive violence, but this one felt different. When I joined Jaylen Brown, a member of the Boston Celtics, last weekend to march with peaceful protesters in Atlanta, I gained a greater respect for the bravery and courage it has required for generations of leaders before us to stand up to their oppressors. With police flanked on either side of our crowd, the Georgia heat beamed and the fear was visceral.
“Jaylen’s greatest impact, as good as he is in basketball, won’t be in basketball. He’s a special guy,” Stevens said. “He’s a special leader. He’s smart, but he has courage. He’s got a lot of great stuff to him. I think we recognized that when we drafted him, but he has been even more unbelievable every day, every year. “I’ve always personally really enjoyed listening to him and talking to him about things outside of basketball. He told me he was going down there on Thursday and I obviously knew … I’m certainly not surprised by him taking a leadership role. That’s who he is.”
As Maxwell proudly watched Celtics such as Jaylen Brown, Marcus Smart, Enes Kanter, and Vincent Poirier join in peaceful demonstrations, using their social media channels to rev up support in real time, he wondered what life might have been like if he had had access to similar platforms. “To have my voice heard,” he said. “For me to have gone someplace and been a popular athlete and said, ‘There is a beach in South Carolina which is segregated, and they put a chain-link fence in the water and you have to swim all the way out to go around?’ I was thinking as a little boy like, ‘Damn, was the water different? If you went past this area, what would happen?’ But I’d love to go back, and I’d love to be like these guys.”
Maxwell, the 1981 NBA Finals MVP and radio commentator for Celtics broadcasts, was particularly moved by Brown. The fourth-year forward said he drove 15 hours from Boston to Atlanta last weekend to lead his own peaceful protest in his home state. Brown, 23, put out a call on Twitter and Instagram and was joined on his march by about 100 people, including Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon. “I think that was beautiful,” Maxwell said. “For him and Brogdon to be able to do that and pull that off is great. One thing with Jaylen Brown is you really see that person, that guy where you go, ‘Man, I really admire what he does from a personal standpoint.’ He gets it and understands who is he is and appreciates his community. For him to do that was special.”
Chris Grenham: Malcolm Brogdon: “I got a grandfather who marched next to Dr. King in the 60’s. He was amazing and he would be proud to see us all here.” He added “Jaylen, man, has led this charge. I’m proud of him. We need more leaders.”