Joel Embiid Rumors

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#21
Joel Embiid
Joel Embiid
Position: C
Born: 03/16/94
Height: 7-0 / 2.13
Weight:250 lbs. / 113.4 kg.
Salary: $27,504,630
“I thought about it,” Embiid said when asked whether he considered opting out. “The current trend (of) people getting sick and a lot of people dying, obviously you don’t know what’s gonna happen, (but) you don’t want to be in a situation where you put your life at risk and all that stuff just for, what, the money? “At the end of the day, basketball is not all that matters. I got family, I got myself to look out for,” Embiid continued. “All I want to be is stay healthy and stay safe. Keep the people around me safe. I want to make sure I’m able to live for a long time and not have any sort of consequences in the future.”
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
For all the focus on the many imperfections of the Simmons-Joel Embiid duo in Philly these past three seasons, or the style of play tug of war that has taken place in their Kobe-Shaq Lite environment, the fact remains that they’re the two most pivotal pieces on a team that some scouts still see as capable of being the surprise team in the East. And Simmons, it seems, is not only fully recovered from the “nerve impingement” that was threatening their chances at a long playoff run back in mid-March but he’s bigger and stronger too.
For all the focus on the many imperfections of the Simmons-Joel Embiid duo in Philly these past three seasons, or the style of play tug of war that has taken place in their Kobe-Shaq Lite environment, the fact remains that they’re the two most pivotal pieces on a team that some scouts still see as capable of being the surprise team in the East. And Simmons, it seems, is not only fully recovered from the “nerve impingement” that was threatening their chances at a long playoff run back in mid-March but he’s bigger and stronger too.
The NBA will use March 11 as the end date of the regular season for incentives clauses. That means player bonuses will be prorated over the amount of games his team had played at the time the season was postponed. For example, the New Orleans Pelicans’ Jrue Holiday has a games-played bonus in his contract that will be prorated from 66 down to 51 games. The bonus is considered met since Holiday played in 55 games — more than his new threshold of 51 games played. The 76ers’ Joel Embiid will have the remaining three years left on his salary — $29.5 million, $31.6 million and $33.6 million — become fully guaranteed, even if he suffers a career-ending injury to his feet or lower back. Embiid had a benchmark for playing 1,650 minutes that has been reduced to 1,307 based on the 65 games Philadelphia played as of March 11. At the time the season was postponed, Embiid had played 1,329 minutes.

Joel Embiid's final three years of contract now guaranteed

One agreement finalized in recent days includes the NBA prorating performance bonuses and incentives using March 11 as the end date of the regular season — eliminating the eight additional seeding games in Orlando as part of the formula, sources said. For Philadelphia 76ers All-Star Joel Embiid, it means meeting the minutes-played criteria needed to fully guarantee the final three years and nearly $95 million on his $148 million maximum contract, sources said.
Embiid signed a five-year, $148 million deal extension in 2017 that included financial protections for the Sixers had Embiid suffered career-ending injuries involving his back or feet. Those protections are moot now; Embiid has shown his durability and his All-NBA production has actually outsized his contract. Embiid needed 1,650 minutes this season to fully guarantee the contract, but prorated over the Sixers’ 65 games that lowered the requirement to below the 1,329 minutes he had played this season.
The big man’s training routine has ramped up lately, as he prepares himself for a potential return to play: “We’ve been going at it for the past four weeks, about six times a week, just trying to get a head start, and get ready for whatever’s coming. I have something to prove, and I feel like whenever that opportunity comes, it’s going to be my time.” The All-Star will aim to capitalize on the momentum he was building prior to the hiatus: “I felt like before the season got shut down, I was on that path. Especially after that All-Star game, my mentality completely changed. First part of the season wasn’t up to my standard, not even close. I was on that path of changing it all, go out, and make it happen.”
Early in the hiatus, Embiid pledged $500,000 to COVID-19 relief and research efforts. Embiid thought it was important to give back: “Being where I’m from, the way I grew up, I saw a lot of struggle. Being in my position, where I have the power to change people’s lives, and to help people, it’s just me. I didn’t even have to think twice about it. That’s the way my parents raised me, that’s the way I was brought up. Add in the fact that growing up in Africa, in Cameroon, all the struggle that I saw – it’s only right for me to make that kind of gesture… I want to keep doing it, and help as many people as I can.”
Even as the NBA appears to be closer to a return, Embiid is still emphasizing safety — though he misses playing in front of the Wells Fargo Center crowd. “First of all, I want everybody to remain safe. I want to be safe,” Embiid said. “This is nothing to play with. You don’t know what can happen. But when the time is right and everything is safe and I can be on the court, I feel like what I’m going to be missing the most is just being out there, winning for the city of Philadelphia, representing the city of Philadelphia, and just going out there and dominating.”
It was an odd first half to the season, but outside of a shoulder injury that cost him five games, Embiid was looking more like his old self after the break. “I feel like before the season got shut down, I was on that path,” Embiid said. “Especially after that All-Star Game, my mentality just completely changed. First part of the season, it wasn’t up to my standards — not even close. I was on that path to just changing all that and making it happen.”
Like anyone missing basketball, Embiid watched “The Last Dance” documentary. There are some parallels to be made as Embiid and Ben Simmons have had their share of disappointment in the postseason. Much like Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen did with the “Bad Boy” Pistons, the Sixers’ All-Star duo may have to overcome their playoff boogeymen in Boston and Toronto. Embiid believes he can push his teammates the same way Jordan once did. “I did watch it. It was interesting,” Embiid said. “I saw a lot of similarities and a lot of people have told me that. … I can also be that guy, I just need to keep putting in the work and that’s what I’ve been doing.”
Storyline: Michael Jordan Documentary
Joel Embiid: So far, my biggest efforts have been in Cameroon and Philadelphia, the two places I call home. My very first initiatives were focused on my Arthur Embiid & Angels Foundation, inspired by the memory of my brother Arthur, and established to protect and unite disadvantaged children in Cameroon. We wanted to partner with a well-established organization in Cameroon and did so with UNICEF to help children in need. I’ve since also worked with my incredible partner Under Armour as it relates to efforts in Philly, including a court refurbishment in my brother Arthur’s name at the Boys & Girls Club of Philadelphia.