John Wall Rumors

All NBA Players
John Wall
Position: G
Born: 09/06/90
Height: 6-4 / 1.93
Weight:195 lbs. / 88.5 kg.
Salary: $38,199,000
Bradley Beal had 31 points that night, but the Wizards were Wall’s show. He possessed the ball for 11 minutes per game that series while Beal was a distant second on the team, averaging only 2.8 minutes. Wall had the ball in his hands for more minutes per game than any player in the NBA from 2013-14 to 2018-19, per NBA Advanced Stats. Wall was the star and Beal was the sidekick, and though there wasn’t always harmony between the two, or even among the team at large, the hierarchy worked. The Wizards made four postseason appearances, and at one point were seen as one of the NBA’s rising young teams.
Storyline: Wall-Beal Dynamic
This season, Beal took command. With Wall out since December 2018 due to Achilles injuries, Beal averaged 30.5 points and 6.1 assists with a 57.9 true shooting percentage this season, numbers that have been exceeded in a single season by only Oscar Robertson, Michael Jordan, and James Harden. But the Wizards have treaded water at 24-40, and though they made the cut to resume play in Orlando later this month, their season is basically over: Wall, Beal (rotator cuff injury), and breakthrough stretch big Davis Bertans (free agency) will all sit out the restart. To qualify for the postseason play-in tournament, the Wizards would need to win two or more games than the Nets or Magic with only eight games to play. Good luck doing that when Ish Smith, Troy Brown Jr., and Rui Hachimura are your new Big Three.
The John Wall Family Foundation (JWFF) announced today that it has raised over ​$550,00​ ​during its month-long “202 Assist” fundraiser, ​nearly doubling its original goal of $300,000. John Wall and the JWFF would like to extend their sincere gratitude to those who donated, shared, and assisted in this campaign. “I am overwhelmed ​by​ ​how the community came together to help their neighbors,” Wall said. “This is yet another example of how, despite what’s going on in our city and across the world, we are still unified. We are in this together and we will come out of this together.”
“A few years ago,” Strauss continues, “John Wall didn’t love that when he walked around everywhere, he saw kids wearing Kyrie Irving’s shoes. For a guy like John Wall, it was a representation that he was a tier below Kyrie, and he was reminded of it every time he walked outside. For the guys at the very top, it seems like it’s huge. There was a lot of friction between Shaq and Penny Hardaway over their different sneaker lines, with Shaq even smacking the Lil’ Penny character.” (In fairness, it’s more like a nudge.)
“A few years ago,” Strauss continues, “John Wall didn’t love that when he walked around everywhere, he saw kids wearing Kyrie Irving’s shoes. For a guy like John Wall, it was a representation that he was a tier below Kyrie, and he was reminded of it every time he walked outside. For the guys at the very top, it seems like it’s huge. There was a lot of friction between Shaq and Penny Hardaway over their different sneaker lines, with Shaq even smacking the Lil’ Penny character.” (In fairness, it’s more like a nudge.)
Washington Wizards rookie Rui Hachimura was among the players on Friday that marched from Capital One Arena to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. to help raise awareness for police brutality and racism. Hachimura joined with Wizards teammates John Wall and Bradley Beal in the two-plus mile march to help spark social justice reform on Juneteenth, a holiday that celebrates the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln to free enslaved people in Confederate states. In addition to the three Wizards players, members of the Washington Mystics, including Natasha Cloud, were also on hand.
Washington Wizards rookie Rui Hachimura was among the players on Friday that marched from Capital One Arena to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. to help raise awareness for police brutality and racism. Hachimura joined with Wizards teammates John Wall and Bradley Beal in the two-plus mile march to help spark social justice reform on Juneteenth, a holiday that celebrates the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln to free enslaved people in Confederate states. In addition to the three Wizards players, members of the Washington Mystics, including Natasha Cloud, were also on hand.
“I’m scared to get pulled over,” Wall told Butler. “I’ve seen some people on Twitter when I said that say, ‘well, what are you scared to get pulled over for, they might want an autograph?’ I said, ‘No, it don’t work like that. I’m still a black athlete in America in this world and I know how it’s going.’ If I have to get pulled over, I’m going to a gas station or I’m going somewhere where there’s a lot of people and a lot of lights are at. And I’m scared to get pulled over on the highway. You don’t want it to get dark at night and pulled over on the highway because you never know what can happen.”
Wall has participated in camps for Team USA, but has never represented them on the Olympic stage. In fact, the Wizards/Bullets franchise has never had an active player on the Olympic roster. “Definitely,” Wall told Marc Spears when asked if he was interested. “When you put that Red, White and Blue on, you’re representing your country. It doesn’t matter if ‘Wall’ is on the back or whatever name is on the back, I want to represent my country. I know how much this country means to me and I would definitely love to have an opportunity to play for it.”

John Wall wants DeMarcus Cousins on the Wizards

Wall spoke on the matter Wednesday in an Instagram Live interview with ESPN’s The Undefeated. He told Marc Spears he is still lobbying for the Wizards to sign Cousins, though after years of doing so, he seems to understand full well it is probably still a pipe dream. “Oh man, you know I’m trying to push for that. I’ve been on that for like five years. I want to sign him right now,” Wall said.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 233 more rumors
By the time the NBA returns in late July, Cousins will be less than a year removed from a very serious injury. So, it probably wouldn’t be smart for Cousins to return until next year, and Wall even said that himself. “I’m like ‘bro, be smart, take your time to get all the way healthy so you can show these people what you’re all about,'” Wall said. “I want him to focus on that and get back to the Boogie that he was.”
“During this pandemic, if you don’t come out of this a better person, I mean, I don’t know what to tell you,” John Wall said Tuesday in a conversation with The Athletic. “You know how people always say; I don’t have time to do this or time to do that? Well, we have all the time in the world to do all the things we couldn’t do the last three months. We couldn’t go nowhere. So, you can lock in and focus on what you need to focus on.”
“It’s just crazy that we go through this. There’s nothing we can solve,” he said. “We always thought that you still have racism in the world, but you wouldn’t think it would be as bad as it is now. It never stops. All we’re really asking for is justice. But just imagine: If we didn’t have camera phones or social media, we wouldn’t see these videos of how people are getting murdered. And it would just keep going on and going on.
“You just gotta continue to protest peacefully,” John Wall said. “That’s the one thing you can do: Continue to protest peacefully, register to vote, educate yourself on the candidates. And most importantly, just go vote. If you do that, I think you can still play basketball, because if this happened and the season was still going on, what would we do? You know what I mean? I get where they (are) coming from. I understand the other side of it. I (also) understand the other side of guys wanna play, guys wanna play the game. We’ve been going through stuff like this throughout our lives. … We can still play basketball, but you have to still keep your mind on this stuff.”
“What happened with me and the organization at the end, it hurt, but from a business standpoint, it made sense for Ted,” Arenas said. “You have to start over. You have to start fresh. I remember when John Wall came, and I said to him: ‘Listen, I’m not some guy that’s going to sit here and beef with you over this spot. It’s your spot. This is your team. I’m on the outs. I’m going to follow your lead.’ Me and John have been big brother, little brother since then. There’s never been any problems with him.”
John Wall has had many battles with Kyrie Irving on the court, but he stands with him in what has become the league’s biggest off-court storyline. Irving has sounded some alarms about the NBA’s restart at Disney World, saying players should consider not going in light of recent protests around the country seeking social justice reform. Wall explained on ‘The Tuff Juice Podcast’ with Caron Butler why he feels the same.
Wall further clarified to say that even if he was fully healthy, he wouldn’t go. Wall, of course, is continuing through a lengthy recovery from a ruptured Achilles tendon. He is not going to play anyways for that reason. But if he were in the same boat as the rest of the players, he wouldn’t go. “If I was healthy enough to play, I wouldn’t want to go play,” he said. “What am I going, just to play eight games? I’m not going for just eight games and then coming back home.”
According to Bonga, we may be underestimating Wall a bit. “I think people don’t get how still crazy good John is right now. People don’t get it. People don’t get it. Seeing John… with us and [with] G-League [players]. It’s like, man, he cannot wait. He legit can’t wait to be back out there. That’s what he be showing every day out there. It’s crazy,” Bonga said.
Storyline: John Wall Injury
According to Bonga, we may be underestimating Wall a bit. “I think people don’t get how still crazy good John is right now. People don’t get it. People don’t get it. Seeing John… with us and [with] G-League [players]. It’s like, man, he cannot wait. He legit can’t wait to be back out there. That’s what he be showing every day out there. It’s crazy,” Bonga said.
Storyline: John Wall Injury
Shams Charania of The Athletic said as much during a guest appearance in Complex’s Load Management podcast, noting that the Pelicans were among the teams to show interest in Beal: “New Orleans was a team that last year I heard looked into it… The Lakers at one point had interest in Beal. If you have interest in winning basketball games, you’re gonna have interest in Bradley Beal,” said Charania. “But everything he’s said so far, he wants to stay a Wizard. The Wizards have said they want to keep him. I don’t expect something on him until we see John Wall and Brad Beal play again.”
Storyline: Bradley Beal Trade?
Like many matters of business these days, the Wizards’ strong statement on the death of George Floyd and racial injustice began with a Zoom call. Wizards forward Isaac Bonga told the backstory to Chris Miller on NBC Sports Washington’s ‘Wizards Talk’ podcast this week. Bonga said the team wanted to do something in unity, so John Wall, Bradley Beal and general manager Tommy Sheppard got all the players together virtually to talk about it.
Here’s how it came about, per Bonga: “I’ve gotta give a big shout-out to Brad and John, and also Tommy. In those situations, you have such good leaders. [I’m] seeing during these times… improvement and a step up from people like Brad to leading people. I know he put out his own other statement, but seeing him in this position, he’s taking steps into becoming a really good leader off the court. Obviously, you have leaders on the court, but he’s being a leader off the court. That’s where I’m most impressed by him and people like John and Tommy also,” Bonga said.

Where the Wizards go from here will depend on many different factors, Wall’s health being one of them. But Leonsis seems confident in the potential of his team and their current track, as well as Wall and Beal as a pair despite what some might say is enough evidence their partnership has run its course. “I think they both, and I know they have communicated about this, realize that winning will define who they are and what their legacy is way more than their individual stats or their contract dollars. So, that comes with maturity. The 10 years have gone fast and I think that humbles people positively that nothing is given to you and that it’s a blur how fast it goes,” Leonsis said.
“If I get pulled over right now, I’m terrified,” Wall said on this week’s “Hoops, Adjacent” podcast. “To be realistic. If I’m in a dark area, or a back street, I’m not stopping. I’ll go to a high-speed chase to get to a spot where it’s a grocery store, or somewhere where’s there’s a lot of lights at, because that’s how terrifying it is. You’re telling me if I want to be a black kid to jog in a neighborhood, and I say, ‘okay, I want to cut through this white neighborhood, this rich neighborhood,’ and then all of a sudden, I’m targeted to get killed? Because I don’t belong there? Those are the kind of things I grew up with, like you wouldn’t go to this side of town where you wasn’t allowed. Why? We breathe the same air.”
But Floyd’s death – the officer who killed him has now been charged with second-degree murder by the state’s district attorney, with the other officers arrested this week and charged with aiding and abetting the crime – has touched a nerve, both among black people and many whites who are finally speaking up and speaking out. “It’s devastating, and it’s kind of frustrating,” Wall said. “Sometimes people want to go out there and act with their anger and do things. But sometimes the best way to do it is to speak with your words and not be silenced … I just feel like the most important thing we really all want to see is justice. I think that’s really what we want. A lot of us have gone out here and protested, and doing it in a peaceful manner and in the right ways, getting people to kneel and all those type of things. But I just think we want justice. That’s the fact of it; we want justice. And the scary part about it is, I feel like this has been going on for decades, been going on for so much longer than the time that I’ve been on this earth. But if we didn’t have social media or camera phones right now, we wouldn’t be able to see this act going on.”

John Wall not returning until next season

Don’t expect Washington Wizards point guard John Wall to suit up in Orlando. While he has declared that he’s “110 percent” healthy, the five-time All-Star has repeatedly said that he isn’t going to play this season. Head coach Scott Brooks and general manager Tommy Sheppard have echoed this sentiment. Earlier this week, Wall reiterated that he won’t be back until the start of the 2020-21 campaign. “No. I won’t play at all. I’ll wait until next season,” Wall told 980 The Team’s Kevin Sheehan. “That decision has already been made. So, no, I’m not [playing].”
This rumor is part of a storyline: 280 more rumors
“Me not playing all season, I’m trying to get into a rhythm of practicing,” he said. “And the last two or three months, I haven’t been around the guys, I haven’t worked out with the guys, and we haven’t got any chemistry or anything like that. So, that’s a big factor. So, no, I won’t play at all. I’ll let those guys continue to work and keep getting better, and then I just can’t wait to get out there with those guys next season.”
“Better safe than sorry,” one Western Conference executive explained. “I’m not sure how much teams are really ‘preparing’ for him to play. It’s more so just being aware of his strengths and weaknesses in the event that he does play. And I do think he should play. The Wizards have the least to lose of any team there, and they’re the only team in the league that seems to believe a backcourt of John Wall and Bradley Beal makes them a contender.”
So, now that 10 years have passed, has the plan worked as well as Leonsis had hoped? “I thought at the time we were executing a very good strategy of drafting and retaining and keeping our young players together as a core. John was the first pick, Brad [Beal] was third, Otto [Porter Jr.] was third. That seemed to be working,” Leonsis told NBC Sports Washington. “For the most part, it was the right strategy. Injuries have played a very, very big role in the ultimate state of the team. And we’ve lived and learned and we’ve made much bigger investments in our health and wellness programs and training and the like. So, the strategy and the plan is incomplete.”