Karl Malone Rumors

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Karl Malone
Karl Malone
Position: -
Born: 07/24/63
Height: 6-9 / 2.06
Weight:255 lbs. / 116.1 kg.
Earnings: $101,723,378 ($158,088,475*)
Sacre: “I can think of one just off his competitive drive as a competitor. They showed his points, and he was maybe a couple of points behind Michael Jordan at the time, or he might’ve been in third place. I like to poke the bear, I was like, ‘Damn, Kobe, Karl Malone’s got more than you.’ Kobe goes, ‘Well, he never won a championship, so what do those points even matter?’ I was like, ‘Alright. Come on, man. You can discredit him just because he didn’t win a championship, that it doesn’t even matter.’ He was a competitor, no matter what. No matter what statement or anything. He was always trying to argue with you. He’s got to win the argument. That was just how he was.”
Karl Malone: “I love Chris Webber but this was one time where I wanted to kick his ass. Right? So we had been wearing them out – at home – and Chris Webber started at half court looking for John Stockton. On the flip side, I say ‘Good on you Chris for studying the playbook. And we ran that four up and he didn’t even care. He hit Stockton right in the sternum with his elbow. I damn near felt it and [it] hurt. …I felt so bad I went over to Coach [Jerry] Sloan and I said, ‘Coach, don’t run that again, please.’ Stock[ton] looked at me and said ‘No, I’m good’ and the next play– well, you know.”
Karl Malone: “Guys, I love Zion Williamson. We might not ever know his full potential. There was a young man who played at LSU – [Glen] ‘Big Baby’ Davis – Big Baby made a comment about eight months ago. And he came on that show and he said ‘Hey now, guys, I’m about to get into trouble with what I’m about to say. I know everybody loves Zion and I love him too. But Zion has the same body type that I got.’ He was talking about himself. And [Davis] said, ‘If [Williamson] don’t get into shape, we’ll never know his full potential.’ And he did get heat for that. But guess what guys, he needs to be averaging 40 minutes a game. You are a 21-22-year-old kid, your ass shouldn’t be getting tired.”
Meanwhile, Jordan was the best perimeter player of the ’90s. And the second-best was … John Stockton? Clyde Drexler? Grant Hill for that one year? Especially after Magic Johnson retired in 1991, nobody came anywhere close. Instead, Jordan’s era was one where Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Karl Malone, Charles Barkley, Patrick Ewing and a young Shaquille O’Neal were the dominant forces. Malone and Barkley were the players who beat him out for MVP awards, while Olajuwon pushed Jordan down to third in 1993 and Robinson finished second, third and third at various points. No sane person considered another perimeter player ahead of Jordan on their MVP ballot from 1991 to 1998. In the two years Jordan (mostly) sat out, 193 of the 202 first-place MVP votes went to the bigs I listed above. Just nine went to perimeter players of any stripe. The six bigs I named above were the top six players in the 1995 MVP vote; only then did other perimeter players become a topic.
Storyline: GOAT Debate