Kyrie Irving Rumors

All NBA Players
#11
Kyrie Irving
Kyrie Irving
Position: G
Born: 03/23/92
Height: 6-2 / 1.88
Weight:180 lbs. / 81.6 kg.
Salary: $31,742,000
Irving spoke with his sister Asia in an Instagram live chat to discuss the latest Kyrie 6 colorway that she designed. Irving is well-aware that critics and NBA fans have been making fun of him for his eye-brow raising antics. But for him, what matters most is what he’s been doing over the past decade for the basketball community and society. “It’s about on the court, look at my resume, look at the classics, look at my art,” he said. “I created it for going on 10-plus years now. Don’t play with me. Don’t play with what I do on a day in and day out basis to provide and go out there and create.”

Storyline: Jamal Crawford Free Agency

Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving is joining rapper Common and others for a TV special calling for action following the death of Breonna Taylor. Irving is producing “#SAYHERNAME: BREONNA TAYLOR,” which will debut Wednesday at 7 p.m. EDT on the PlayersTv digital and broadcast network. Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency medical technician, was shot eight times in Louisville, Kentucky, by plainclothes officers serving a narcotics search warrant without knocking at her apartment on March 13. No drugs were found. Louisville has seen weeks of protests over the shooting and demonstrators around the country have chanted her name.
Irving, who has been outspoken about social justice issues, says as society is calling attention to police brutality and systemic racism, it is “critical to magnify how these unjust behaviors and practices are directly impacting Black women.” Alicia Garza, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, Democratic U.S. Rep. Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and journalist Jemele Hill are among the others appearing in the program.
When he gets back to the head coaching search, Marks intends to talk to Brooklyn’s “key players” about who will run the show next. And he specifically mentioned Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving when addressing the matter on WFAN: It would be probably, you know, not incredibly smart of us if we did not involve some of these key players in this decision. That only goes to Kevin, I think it’s — you know, Kevin and Kyrie, we’re gonna pick their brains on what they are looking for in a leader, what they want in a coach, what they need. I think these guys have been brutally honest so far.
Storyline: Nets Coaching Job
And Marks won’t ask his stars to expose themselves to COVID-19 in Orlando to evaluate the work of interim coach and perceived frontrunner Jacque Vaughn, either. “It would not be smart of us if we were not to involve some of these key players in this decision,” Marks said. “Kevin, Kyrie, we’re going to pick their brains on what they’re looking for in a leader, what they need. They’ve been brutally honest so far.
Storyline: Nets Coaching Search
And Marks won’t ask his stars to expose themselves to COVID-19 in Orlando to evaluate the work of interim coach and perceived frontrunner Jacque Vaughn, either. “It would not be smart of us if we were not to involve some of these key players in this decision,” Marks said. “Kevin, Kyrie, we’re going to pick their brains on what they’re looking for in a leader, what they need. They’ve been brutally honest so far.
Storyline: Nets Coaching Search
Royce White: Dear Kyrie Irving, The revolution has begun. The climate of society is ripe for radical change. The systems of old are hanging on for dear life. The spirit of your intuition is shining through. First and foremost, I want to say thank you for your courage. I’ve watched in admiration as your willingness to challenge the status quo has mounted. I consider you a brother. We are comrades on the periphery, in a world that is overflowing with centrists. You have rightfully questioned the validity and competence of the system, its leadership and its motivation.
Royce White: What black athletes can do to leverage their societal position is even less complex. Many of these lukewarm centrists want to use leverage as a noun. But leverage is one of those unique words that does not exist without action. In that way leverage is the perfect reflection of what is needed now. Leverage is a verb, it requires use. If one doesn’t use their leverage, it simply does not exist in a real way. Anybody saying athletes should return to play in order to “leverage” their celebrity so they can speak about these issues on some “larger platform” does not understand the gravity of this moment. They don’t understand the call to social duty. As you and many others have recently voiced, our activism can no longer take shape as these infertile awareness campaigns. Everybody is aware, they’ve been aware. This time, only action will suffice.
Royce White: In this vein I would like to submit a call to action for the NBA and its players. There are many days of heavy frontline protests ahead, and I hope you’ll join us. For now, if you are to uphold the dignity of the progress that we see being made all around us, it is time you let your actions stand on their own. Led by you, the players should demand that a return to “business as usual” comes with each NBA team contributing the cash to build a black bank in their home city. This will be a match program where players and other sponsors contribute an equal amount for a second additional black bank. Overnight 60 black banks will be created in this country. This will be the start of “Operation Black Blank,”an economic initiative that all the other pro sports institutions can join.

Ryan Hollins: "Kyrie learned some poor leadership from LeBron"

Ryan Hollins: “LeBron can’t cast a shadow, he [Irving] has a lot of maturing to do as we all have. You gotta think these 23, 24, 25, 26 year old guys casting a big spot so, to be honest I looked at the content and the intentions behind your heart. Who you are versus trying to stunt on somebody because you’re 25 years old and you don’t know any better. But I think the way those two butted heads kind of left a bad imprint on Kyrie. It was bad business. It was some things that LeBron did. You know, Kyrie learned some poor leadership from LeBron and some of the stuff he did and I think Kyrie tried to come into his own in a different way. But very smart, very intelligent you know, really soft-spoken and trying to find out how to be a leader.
Ryan Hollins: “I don’t think Kyrie is a natural leader. You know some guys that are like — you see the 7 or 8 year old in the AAU game where he’s putting all the kids in the right spot, and he’s thinking of everybody…that’s NOT Kyrie. I think that’s something that he’s trying to grow and learn and do, and I think he’s handled a couple of situations wrong. I don’t think he’s lied about anything except about the world is flat when he was jokingly, but I think speaking out in the media; that’s a tightrope of a situation when you talk about your teammates. So I think some of those things he’ll admit that he wants to reel back.”
“Kyrie is a great dude,” Ryan Hollins told me on this week’s episode of the Scoop B Radio Podcast. “Humble, down to earth, cool…if anything like — you know what’s funny, like of all the guys that were in the team, he hung out with Luke Harangody the most. And Like was a Notre Dame guy and some type of ACC connection was there. Like, Kyrie is not big on going with the norm or trying to be cool or popular. He doesn’t mind being outside the box. Cool down to earth. Great dude man.”
Ballmer addressed the concerns of players such as Kyrie Irving, who questioned if the restart would take away from players focussing their efforts on the movement for racial justice by saying that participating in the return of NBA action could actually have the opposite effect and increase the visibility of their message. “The league and the NBA Players Association are also in discussions about how to elevate those to focus on those, and not take our players away from the voices they can have, but to allow them to have maybe even more voice through restarting the season,” Ballmer said.
“A few years ago,” Strauss continues, “John Wall didn’t love that when he walked around everywhere, he saw kids wearing Kyrie Irving’s shoes. For a guy like John Wall, it was a representation that he was a tier below Kyrie, and he was reminded of it every time he walked outside. For the guys at the very top, it seems like it’s huge. There was a lot of friction between Shaq and Penny Hardaway over their different sneaker lines, with Shaq even smacking the Lil’ Penny character.” (In fairness, it’s more like a nudge.)
“A few years ago,” Strauss continues, “John Wall didn’t love that when he walked around everywhere, he saw kids wearing Kyrie Irving’s shoes. For a guy like John Wall, it was a representation that he was a tier below Kyrie, and he was reminded of it every time he walked outside. For the guys at the very top, it seems like it’s huge. There was a lot of friction between Shaq and Penny Hardaway over their different sneaker lines, with Shaq even smacking the Lil’ Penny character.” (In fairness, it’s more like a nudge.)
This year, given the unique circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic and the nation’s current reckoning over race and injustice, the Liberty continued that work with a virtual conversation for the 155-year anniversary of Juneteenth. The conversation about freedom, justice, equality featured Liberty point guard Layshia Clarendon and Brooklyn Nets forward Garrett Temple on the panel. They discussed athletes’ responsibility regarding the movement for racial justice and returning to work during the pandemic, which looks very different for the NBA and the WNBA. “Kyrie [Irving] could play or not and people are going to listen to what he says,” Clarendon said. “But our strength [in the WNBA] is in numbers.”
Some players, including Brooklyn’s Kyrie Irving and Los Angeles Lakers guard Avery Bradley, have discussed the possibility of boycotting the restart of the 2019-20 NBA season. “I never wanted to be put in a box on the court (as a pure point guard) or off the court (as being recognized solely as an athlete),” Thomas says. “So when I look at players today, I say they are sons and daughters, they are mothers and fathers, they are citizens, and then they are athletes. So they have multitudes. We can be citizens and we can also be athletes, and you don’t have to be one or the other. You can be both and there’s a movement that’s going on in this country. What society has said is that systemic racism at all levels is bigger than sports. It’s bigger than the game. Because right now it’s about getting America right. And our sports personalities are speaking to getting America right. These are the young people right now that truly have a chance to change the world forever.”
A handful of players involved in Friday’s call over concerns about plans to restart the 2019-20 season expressed strongly that they would consider not playing, according to a source familiar with the call. But some veterans on the call open to sitting out had a question for the players, such as Brooklyn’s Kyrie Irving, who supported the idea. “They were asking, ‘What’s the plan?'” a source familiar with the call said of the response of some veterans on the call. “Even the players who supported the idea of sitting, they were asking about a plan of action. There was no plan.'”
However, the NBA champion did apologize for his “bird” statement in an interview with Brandon “Scoop B” Robinson of Heavy: “Now was my bird statement a little out of character? Yes it was. And guess what? I apologized to Kyrie Irving for that,” Kendrick Perkins said. “Do I agree with him sayin’ that we all need to hold out? No I don’t. I don’t agree with that because I need to know a plan behind it, you see what I’m sayin’? That’s all. “At the time was it appropriate? Absolutely not. Now thinking back on it, no. [But] Kyrie in my eyes, in my opinion, he’s confused. He’s confused as a leader. I’m standing behind it.”
A handful of players involved in Friday’s call over concerns about plans to restart the 2019-20 season expressed strongly that they would consider not playing, according to a source familiar with the call. But some veterans on the call open to sitting out had a question for the players, such as Brooklyn’s Kyrie Irving, who supported the idea. “They were asking, ‘What’s the plan?'” a source familiar with the call said of the response of some veterans on the call. “Even the players who supported the idea of sitting, they were asking about a plan of action. There was no plan.'”
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
However, the NBA champion did apologize for his “bird” statement in an interview with Brandon “Scoop B” Robinson of Heavy: “Now was my bird statement a little out of character? Yes it was. And guess what? I apologized to Kyrie Irving for that,” Kendrick Perkins said. “Do I agree with him sayin’ that we all need to hold out? No I don’t. I don’t agree with that because I need to know a plan behind it, you see what I’m sayin’? That’s all. “At the time was it appropriate? Absolutely not. Now thinking back on it, no. [But] Kyrie in my eyes, in my opinion, he’s confused. He’s confused as a leader. I’m standing behind it.”
This didn’t get him an All-Star berth, which he would’ve appreciated as validation for his family and vindication because “that shit’s in Chicago,” where he was cut before the 2016-17 season. And his positive press usually came with a side of speculation about his future: Next year, with Kevin Durant and Irving in the picture, is there a place for a pick-and-roll guard like him in Brooklyn? Dinwiddie’s answer is yes.
“First, I’m a basketball player,” he said, “and I try to have the most well-rounded game possible. But people forget when I was recruited out of high school, I was recruited as a passer.” He continued by walking me through his career, explaining that he only became a scorer in college because that’s what the team needed. The same was true in Brooklyn. He cited his 4:1 assist-to-turnover ratio in 2017-18.
“With Kyrie and KD, if you’re telling me I get to come out here and pass to two phenomenal scorers and get 10 assists a game and maybe be in second gear a lot of times with my scoring, I’m fine,” he said. “If I average 14 and 10 and we win a title, but KD averages 35 and Ky averages 25 or whatever it would be, like, I’m good with that. I’m more than fine with that. That’s more in line with how I played the game growing up than it is a lot of the other spurts and seasons that I’ve put together since I’ve been older.”

Kyrie Irving proposing players to start their own league?

Kyrie Irving’s push to skip the bubble has spawned a debate over whether NBA players could effectively influence social reform while playing, or whether they’d have to boycott to force meaningful change. Irving not only led a discussion with close to 100 union members in a conference call, he also urged Nets players to skip the bubble recently in a separate group chat, the Daily News has learned. In that chat, Irving proposed that players could start their own league, according to a source.
“Lebron is making $34.7 million and he’ll lose like $13 million (if the NBA doesn’t resume), so like 35 percent of his pay,” Marks said. “Whereas if he’s going back to Orlando, he’s probably looking at a loss of between $5.5 to $6 million.” Dropping $13 million won’t disrupt LeBron, but, as Marks noted, 72 percent of the players are paid below the average salary of $9.4 million. It’s a top-heavy system, not unlike American society. “There are a lot more Ed Davis’ of the NBA world (who is making $4.7 million with the Utah Jazz) than Kyrie Irving’s of the world (who is making $31.7 million),” Marks said. “There’s a group of guys making over $20 million but the majority of them are making less than 5.”