Malcolm Brogdon Rumors

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#7
Malcolm Brogdon
Malcolm Brogdon
Position: G
Born: 12/11/92
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:223 lbs. / 101.2 kg.
Salary: $20,000,000
Brogdon, who spent a lot of time at St. Vincent Center rehabilitating from a thigh/hip muscle injury during the NBA’s hiatus, also has been active in leading social protests after the death of George Floyd. Multiple league sources aren’t clear on the league’s directives, or if there even is one, regarding positive tests before players arrive in Orlando where they’ll go into the “bubble” before resuming play.
In addition to Silver, Tatum, Stuart, Roberts, Paul and Iguodala, attendees for yesterday’s meeting included NBA President of Social Responsibility & Player Programs Kathy Behrens, NBA Senior Vice President of Player Development Greg Taylor, NBA Senior Vice President of Content Business Operations Kori Davis Porter, NBPA Foundation Executive Director Sherrie Deans, Malcolm Brogdon of the Indiana Pacers, CJ McCollum of the Portland Trail Blazers, Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz, and Trae Young of the Atlanta Hawks. In addition to Silver, Tatum, Stuart, Roberts, Paul and Iguodala, attendees for yesterday’s meeting included NBA President of Social Responsibility & Player Programs Kathy Behrens, NBA Senior Vice President of Player Development Greg Taylor, NBA Senior Vice President of Content Business Operations Kori Davis Porter, NBPA Foundation Executive Director Sherrie Deans, Malcolm Brogdon of the Indiana Pacers, CJ McCollum of the Portland Trail Blazers, Donovan Mitchell of the Utah Jazz, and Trae Young of the Atlanta Hawks.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
On the latest episode of The JJ Redick Podcast, the former LA Clippers guard was joined by Malcolm Brogdon to discuss his thoughts on the state of the country and the NBA’s return later this summer. Additionally, Redick shared a story about how hard he tried to convince LA’s front office to take a chance on Brogdon in the 2016 NBA Draft. “The very first time I met you was after the Clippers and Bucks played your rookie year,” Redick said. “And I came over to you in the hallway and I was like, ‘Hey man, I just wanted to let you know that for the two months leading up to the draft, I was telling everybody in the Clippers’ front office that we should draft you at 25.'”
On the latest episode of The JJ Redick Podcast, the former LA Clippers guard was joined by Malcolm Brogdon to discuss his thoughts on the state of the country and the NBA’s return later this summer. Additionally, Redick shared a story about how hard he tried to convince LA’s front office to take a chance on Brogdon in the 2016 NBA Draft. “The very first time I met you was after the Clippers and Bucks played your rookie year,” Redick said. “And I came over to you in the hallway and I was like, ‘Hey man, I just wanted to let you know that for the two months leading up to the draft, I was telling everybody in the Clippers’ front office that we should draft you at 25.'”
The NBA is preparing to resume its season next month at Disney World in Orlando, Florida, after a more than three month break due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Indiana Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon, however, believes there are several players who are legitimately considering sitting out when the play resumes. “I’ve talked to a few guys that are super interested in sitting out possibly,” Brogdon said Thursday on The JJ Redick podcast. “At the end of the day, I was actually talking to Chris Paul the other day and he said, ‘Man, this is an individual decision that every man has to make for himself.’ I think that’s exactly what it is. I think it depends on your perspective.”
According to Brogdon, it also has a lot to do with George Floyd’s death in police custody last month in Minneapolis and the massive protests and movements that have come from it. “Some guys are going to say, ‘For health reasons, and COVID, and the long-term effects that we don’t understand about COVID, I want to sit out,’” Brogdon said on the podcast. “Other guys are going to say, ‘The black community and my people are going through too much for me to basically be distracted with basketball. I’m not going to prioritize this over the black community, I’m going to sit out.’ And then there’s another group of guys … who are going to say, ‘No, this is the most amount of money I’m going to make in my lifetime. It doesn’t make sense to hand this money back. I can do so much good in my community if I have this money.’ “I think it’s a matter of perspective. I think guys are gathering to really talk about and dive deep into the idea of not playing.“
Storyline: Season Resuming?
Malcolm Brogdon wants to organize a march in Indianapolis. The timing could be tough. It depends on when he needs to report back — he says he’ll return to Indiana about a week before whenever that date is — but he wants to see the Pacers marching. He’s been talking with coach Nate McMillan almost every day on the phone, not about basketball but about ideas. And about how he can make an impact. “We’ve been having conversations for years,” Brogdon said in a Zoom call with local media Friday afternoon. “And now it’s about actions, it’s about solutions.”
But after Celtics star Jaylen Brown mentioned he’d be driving down in a group text, Brogdon reached out. He was nervous at first, but then it came into perspective. “It was sorta impromptu, and it ended up being very powerful,” Brogdon said. “It’s one of those things where you don’t know what a protest, you don’t know what a march feels like until you’re a part of it. It’s one of those things that can be scary, it’s one of those things right now, you see so many people on TV getting injured and having all the trouble with police, and it can be problematic for sure if it gets out of hand. But the way that was handled, the way it went, it definitely was something that was empowering.”
“I think pro athletes, regardless of their race, have a responsibility to be a part of the solution,” Brogdon said. “I think speaking up is a way that you can demonstrate that you’re part of the solution but I think there are other ways. I think you can speak out by writing articles or being in the protests or there’s a whole host of ways you can figure out how to be a part of the solution and not part of the problem.”
Malcolm Brogdon: Like many black men, I have been traumatized by repeatedly viewing the slow death of a brother at the hands of Minneapolis police officers sworn to protect and serve. Any decent person who watches this scene is filled with pain and anguish, horrified as George Floyd slowly asphyxiates, his neck under the knee of another human being while onlookers beg for his life. I am angry that I had to watch, once again, an unarmed black man deliberately killed by police. I am pained, outraged and scared for our country, for my friends and for my family.
Malcolm Brogdon: A restless energy has consumed me for the past week, and initially I couldn’t figure out how to relieve it. I’ve witnessed protests over the past decade for Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown and all the other people suffering from excessive violence, but this one felt different. When I joined Jaylen Brown, a member of the Boston Celtics, last weekend to march with peaceful protesters in Atlanta, I gained a greater respect for the bravery and courage it has required for generations of leaders before us to stand up to their oppressors. With police flanked on either side of our crowd, the Georgia heat beamed and the fear was visceral.
Malcolm Brogdon: I can’t remember the first time I’ve actually watched the video. I think a few too many times. Each time I watch it, it’s a little more traumatizing. So over the past day or so, I’ve stopped really watching the video. I can’t remember where I was the first time I saw it. But I can tell you I watched it the last time I watched it was two nights ago out on my porch, and I just sort of watched it in shock.

Maxwell, the 1981 NBA Finals MVP and radio commentator for Celtics broadcasts, was particularly moved by Brown. The fourth-year forward said he drove 15 hours from Boston to Atlanta last weekend to lead his own peaceful protest in his home state. Brown, 23, put out a call on Twitter and Instagram and was joined on his march by about 100 people, including Pacers guard Malcolm Brogdon. “I think that was beautiful,” Maxwell said. “For him and Brogdon to be able to do that and pull that off is great. One thing with Jaylen Brown is you really see that person, that guy where you go, ‘Man, I really admire what he does from a personal standpoint.’ He gets it and understands who is he is and appreciates his community. For him to do that was special.”
Chris Grenham: Malcolm Brogdon: “I got a grandfather who marched next to Dr. King in the 60’s. He was amazing and he would be proud to see us all here.” He added “Jaylen, man, has led this charge. I’m proud of him. We need more leaders.”

Reggie Miller was asked about Victor Oladipo’s return to the lineup and what that meant for the Pacers. Miller shared what he said heard from Pacers coach Nate McMillan before the matchup. “This lineup for the Pacers is the future,” Miller said. The lineup Miller referred to consists of Oladipo, Malcolm Brogdon, T.J. Warren, Domantas Sabonis and Myles Turner.
USA Basketball announced the preliminary roster for the 2020 Olympics which consists of 44 names. The list is as follows: Bam Adebayo (Miami Heat); LaMarcus Aldridge (San Antonio Spurs); Harrison Barnes (Sacramento Kings); Bradley Beal (Washington Wizards); Devin Booker (Phoenix Suns); Malcolm Brogdon (Indiana Pacers); Jaylen Brown (Boston Celtics); Jimmy Butler (Miami Heat); Mike Conley (Utah Jazz); Stephen Curry (Golden State Warriors); Anthony Davis (Los Angeles Lakers); DeMar DeRozan (San Antonio Spurs); Andre Drummond (Cleveland Cavaliers); Kevin Durant (Brooklyn Nets); Paul George (L.A. Clippers); Draymond Green (Golden State Warriors); James Harden (Houston Rockets); Montrezl Harrell (L.A. Clippers); Joe Harris (Brooklyn Nets); Tobias Harris (Philadelphia 76ers); Gordon Hayward (Boston Celtics); Dwight Howard (Los Angeles Lakers); Brandon Ingram (New Orleans Pelicans); Kyrie Irving (Brooklyn Nets); LeBron James (Los Angeles Lakers); Kyle Kuzma (Los Angeles Lakers); (cont.).
Harris is part of Hoops2O Hoops, aka “The Water Boys,” founded by professional athletes many of whose roots go back to the University of Virginia, Harris’ alma mater. Malcolm Brogdon, the Pacers point guard, initiated the program along with former NFL defensive end Chris Long, a two-time Super Bowl champ. Long put together a video on the group’s mission… “Malcolm is very passionate about it. He had spent some time in Africa growing up,” Harris told the Nets’ Tom Dowd. “He had seen the need for clean drinking water and it had a pretty profound impact on him. He talked to Justin and I about it. Originally, he threw the idea out to Chris. And then one thing led to another.”