Mike Scott Rumors

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#1
Mike Scott
Mike Scott
Position: F
Born: 07/16/88
Height: 6-7 / 2.01
Weight:237 lbs. / 107.5 kg.
Salary: $4,767,000
Philadelphia 76ers forward Mike Scott said players being given a list of phrases they may put on the backs of their jerseys when the NBA season restarts in Orlando, Florida, later this month, rather than choosing what they want to say themselves, was a “bad miss.” “They gave us some names and phrases to put on the back of jerseys. That was terrible. It was just a bad miss, a bad choice,” Scott said Monday during a conference call with reporters. “They didn’t give players a chance to voice our opinions on it; they just gave us a list to pick from. So that was bad, that was terrible. “I’m all about just doing, instead of saying and posting, or putting something on the back of your jersey. I don’t think that’s going to stop anything, you know?”
Philadelphia 76ers forward Mike Scott said players being given a list of phrases they may put on the backs of their jerseys when the NBA season restarts in Orlando, Florida, later this month, rather than choosing what they want to say themselves, was a “bad miss.” “They gave us some names and phrases to put on the back of jerseys. That was terrible. It was just a bad miss, a bad choice,” Scott said Monday during a conference call with reporters. “They didn’t give players a chance to voice our opinions on it; they just gave us a list to pick from. So that was bad, that was terrible. “I’m all about just doing, instead of saying and posting, or putting something on the back of your jersey. I don’t think that’s going to stop anything, you know?”
Philadelphia 76ers forward Mike Scott said the NBA giving players a list of phrases they may put on the backs of their jerseys when the season restarts in Orlando, Florida, later this month, rather than allowing players to choose what they want to say, was a “bad miss.” “They gave us some names and phrases to put on the back of jerseys. That was terrible. It was just a bad miss, a bad choice,” Scott said Monday during a conference call with reporters. “They didn’t give players a chance to voice our opinions on it; they just gave us a list to pick from. So that was bad, that was terrible. “I’m all about just doing, instead of saying and posting, or putting something on the back of your jersey. I don’t think that’s going to stop anything, you know?”
“There’s a lot of stuff. I know everybody has different reasons they’re playing for. … Four hundred and fifty guys, or however many will be there, are sending in whatever they feel like would add to that list and encompass the group that’s going down there,” Brown said. “What I’d like to personally see on there? Maybe ‘Break the Cycle,’ putting that on the back of your jersey. ‘Results,’ that’s what everybody is really playing for. ‘Inequality by Design,’ maybe. Things like that might have a deeper impact than some of the things that were given to us. I think it was a little bit limiting.”
Scott, a fan favorite, is battling through a shooting slump that has resulted in decreased playing time. But the 31-year-old is confident he can help the Sixers when called upon. “Playoffs, regular season, preseason, training camp,” Scott said of when he can help the team. “I’m a hooper.” The Sixers acquired Scott from the Los Angeles Clippers as part of a multiplayer trade last season. He quickly became a fan favorite with his grit, bluntness and ability to hit big three-pointers. Scott averaged 7.8 points and shot 41.2% in 27 regular-season games, including three starts, as a Sixer last season.
Sixers forward Mike Scott echoed Harris’ sentiments about how special it is to play on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day. “He did so much for all the races, trying to bring everybody together, a real positive person in our history and it feels good to play on that day,” Scott said before Saturday’s game. “Sharing a court of all different races, it doesn’t matter who you are, it is bringing everybody together.”
Scott, the fan-favorite who infamously slugged it out with an Eagles fan who was talking “hella shit” last month outside Lincoln Financial Field, enjoyed what he saw. “Definitely entertaining. Let’s get all the bad things out. You don’t want to condone it. The kids are watching,” Scott said, “but I loved it. I thought it was great. That was great. He probably did a…nah, fuck that. That was great. I enjoyed that. When your superstar plays like that, he has that Philly toughness in him. We’ll see what the league does, but I was hype. I was turned up. I thought it was fun. “Some people don’t like it,” Scott said, “but, shit, we in Philly: 1-0, Jo.”
Philadelphia 76ers forward Mike Scott said he should have walked away from the fight with Eagles fans outside Lincoln Financial Field on Sept. 8 but he doesn’t feel sympathy for the fans that were involved in the fight. Scott, who met with reporters at the team’s media day, was asked about the scuffle, which happened before the Eagles’ Week 1 game against the Washington Redskins, at the top of his session.
Scott, who is from southern Virginia, played in college basketball for Virginia and wore a Redskins jersey to the game, acknowledged he has to be the bigger person, but, “as far as sympathy for them, I don’t feel any for the individuals.” He said he doesn’t have animosity toward all Eagles fans. “Those guys don’t represent everyone. I’m not stupid, that doesn’t represent everyone. I still had a ball. Still had fun. Still took pictures with fans, throwing balls in the parking lot and enjoyed the game,” he said.

Pursuant with team policy on player attendance of public events, Scott was accompanied to the game by a member of the Sixers’ security team and was on the way to the aforementioned tailgate when he spotted a coffin surrounded by Redskins paraphernalia on it. A source close to the situation says Scott thought it was a funny thing to see at a tailgate, and approached the area in an attempt to get a picture in front of it.
Storyline: Mike Scott Fight
Upon approaching the area with the coffin — which prominently displayed a “Party Like It’s 1991” shirt, a reference to the last time (1991-92) Washington won the Super Bowl — eyewitnesses say Scott was greeted with hostility by the group tailgating in that area. They did not recognize Scott as a member of the Philadelphia 76ers and instead appeared to view him simply as a large man in opposing colors attempting to start trouble at an Eagles tailgate.
Though some fans in the area initially engaged in the sort of accepted hostility you expect between division rivals — “F*ck the Redskins!” and “F*ck you!” were among the insults directed his way — witnesses say tailgaters who escalated the situation directed racial slurs, specifically the n-word, in Scott’s direction in the area by the coffin. The majority of witnesses who spoke to PhillyVoice painted it as the cause of the fight that was later captured on video, though a smaller group claimed not to have heard them until the shoving eventually broke out.
The majority of witnesses who spoke to PhillyVoice painted it as the cause of the fight that was later captured on video, though a smaller group claimed not to have heard them until the shoving eventually broke out. There was, however, universal agreement that slurs were used during the incident, and multiple eyewitnesses in the area at the time say they continued to hear racially insensitive language after the incident had been broken up and Scott had moved on to go about his day.
Mike Scott may now play for the Philadelphia 76ers, but the 31-year-old forward hasn’t forgotten his Virginia roots, defending his Washington Redskins before the team’s game against the Eagles on Sunday. Scott was seen tailgating at the Eagles game while donning a Redskins’ Sean Taylor jersey and getting into a scuffle with Eagles fans before the game. It is still unclear from the video how the altercation began.

The ninja-style headbands gained tons of popularity in the NBA’s on-court fashion trends last season. However, fans won’t be seeing them anymore in the upcoming season as Nike and the league have reportedly banned it. Philadelphia 76ers forward Mike Scott confirmed the development when fans asked on Twitter if he will sport the ninja-style headbands once again. Scott isn’t too happy with the decision as well and told fans to start a petition.