Rajon Rondo Rumors

All NBA Players
#9
Rajon Rondo
Rajon Rondo
Position: G
Born: 02/22/86
Height: 6-1 / 1.85
Weight:186 lbs. / 84.4 kg.
Salary: $2,564,753
BLADE IN HAND, Mohashie “Mo” Rodriguez carefully guided a straight-edge razor across a customer’s cheek, completing his first pass. It was midday on July 2 at The Cut Stop Barbershop in Miami’s Palmetto Bay neighborhood, and people had been pouring into Rodriguez’s barbershop since the city eased its lockdown rules. As Rodriguez prepared for his second pass, he heard his nearby cellphone ring and spotted the caller ID: Will Rondo, the 39-year-old brother of Los Angeles Lakers point guard Rajon Rondo.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
Dave McMenamin of ESPN talked about Rondo during a recent appearance on ESPN LA 710’s “Mason & Ireland,” and reported that he’s heard that Rondo looks like he found the long-searched-for Fountain of Youth: “If we want to keep going with this hype machine, I had a source tell me that, within the last week — seeing Rajon Rondo — quote, unquote, “He looks like he’s 21 years old again. So, there is some positive momentum to this conversation.”
When a masked Rajon Rondo dropped off groceries to those in need back home in Louisville, Kentucky, the socially distanced recipients always said thank you. And those who recognized him often asked the same thing. “The first question was always, ‘When is the NBA season going to come back?’ ” Rondo told The Undefeated. “I got a lot of those. I told them, ‘I will know the same time you find out.’ ”
There has been some optimism over the possible return of the NBA after many teams recently reopened their practice facilities. The Los Angeles Lakers reopened theirs May 16, and while Rondo said he has yet to return, he hopes the league will return to action in a safe and healthy fashion soon. “I want to play. As a competitor, you want to play,” Rondo said. But he also wants to protect his family and the people around him. “Safety first, understanding that life. We can’t take it for granted, even though we are athletes who are some of the best people in shape as far as body and heart condition. But all it takes is one case where a body can’t fight off the virus.”
Rondo and numerous other NBA players have been helping the less fortunate during the pandemic, with Louisville being his main focus. The Rajon Rondo Foundation joined with Lineage Logistics, a provider of temperature-controlled food logistics, and Louisville food bank Dare to Care to deliver more than 250,000 meals. Rondo spent three weeks in Louisville in April packing and delivering meals, as well as distributing gift cards and exercise kits to senior citizens and families with kids involved in his youth foundation.
Storyline: Coronavirus
NBA star Rajon Rondo, The Rajon Rondo Foundation and Lineage Logistics have partnered in an effort to bring meals to the City of Louisville in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In support of Lineage’s international “Share a Meal” campaign, Lineage Logistics and The Rajon Rondo Foundation announced a donation through Feeding America, to support the local efforts of Louisville’s Dare to Care food bank. The donation will help provide 255,000 meals to families in need.
“For the past eight weeks, my Foundation has been supplying and delivering prepared meals, groceries and gift cards to senior citizens and the families of the youth we serve on a weekly basis,” said Rondo. “The need in our community is significant and this partnership with Lineage allows me the comfort in knowing that Feeding America and Dare to Care are able to help provide food to people who need it most right now.”
Most influential NBA players on Frank Jackson growing up: “I loved watching Allen Iverson when I was younger and Rajon Rondo, when he was with the Celtics. And I think being in the league, the last three years, I think being around Jrue (Holiday) has been just so awesome, tremendously helped me. Same with Rondo. I wish I could have played with him (longer). Jameer Nelson was huge when he was with us. Honestly, I’ve been really fortunate. (Anthony Davis) was great with me. To be surrounded by such awesome guys, but obviously me and Jrue have been buddies since I got here and that’s my dog. He always looks out for me.”
The text chain has survived trades, free-agent signings, reunions gone sour and reunions that never materialized. Consider that at the start of the 2014-15 season, the participants on the chain represented six NBA clubs: Washington (Pierce), Brooklyn (Garnett), Memphis (Allen), Boston (Rondo), Oklahoma City (Perkins) and the LA Clippers (Rivers). Through the years, the chain has endured hurt feelings and periods of silence between individuals who had beef with one another. But, as Pierce said recently, “There hasn’t been a grudge between any of us worth holding on to.” “The guys won’t allow it,” Perkins added.
The text chain can be as simple as checking in about family members and milestones for each other’s kids, or as detailed as potential business opportunities to be considered. The most active texters are the retired players — Garnett, Pierce, Perkins and Allen — who regularly trade insults, and often get together in person in Los Angeles, where each of them has a home except Perkins, though he is regularly in town for his television duties. Garnett talks the most trash; when Perkins retired, he teased his friend on the chain, “What you doing now? Cooking at home wearing an apron?”
NBA star DeMarcus Cousins first hired Noordin Said to be his personal security guard in 2015 during All-Star weekend in New York. From there, the two hit it off, and Said worked the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and the 2017 All-Star weekend in New Orleans at Cousins’ side. Golden State Warriors star Draymond Green hired Said to be his personal security guard during the 2018 playoffs, and Said worked this season with Los Angeles Lakers guard Rajon Rondo at most home games.
Storyline: Coronavirus
Noordin Said, a beloved security official to NBA players and numerous musical artists, died Tuesday in New York after contracting COVID-19, his daughter confirmed to Yahoo Sports. Noordin Said’s mother, Anezia Clemons, who lived with him in New York, also died from COVID-19 approximately seven hours before her 56-year-old son, who died at 1:32 a.m. ET Tuesday.
Storyline: Coronavirus
“I still can’t believe it,” Said’s daughter Samantha told Yahoo Sports. “I don’t believe it. It’s so unreal. You don’t realize how bad this virus is until it hits home. We thought my grandmother passing was kind of taking one for the team. It was almost like she was saying, ‘Take me instead of my son.’ But no … the virus attacked my dad’s lungs really bad, and that was the issue.”
NBA star DeMarcus Cousins first hired Noordin Said to be his personal security guard in 2015 during All-Star weekend in New York. From there, the two hit it off, and Said worked the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro and the 2017 All-Star weekend in New Orleans at Cousins’ side. Golden State Warriors star Draymond Green hired Said to be his personal security guard during the 2018 playoffs, and Said worked this season with Los Angeles Lakers guard Rajon Rondo at most home games. Said was not employed by the teams, but worked for the players individually.