Ray Allen Rumors

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Ray Allen
Ray Allen
Position: -
Born: 07/20/75
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:205 lbs. / 93 kg.
Earnings: $184,356,410 ($240,587,554*)
Chris Bosh: Every day, I was inspired by Bron and D-Wade to push myself harder and reach higher. Not a practice went by during our four years playing together where they didn’t encourage me to leave everything on the floor; and I’d like to think I did the same for them. So, when Lebron told me he’d reinvented his post game in the first few weeks of the 2012 offseason, I knew I had to step it up. And I did. Quickly, our team’s mantra became “Repeat.” And with new additions to our team, like Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis, we were confident we would do it, as long as we kept the intensity at level ten.
Coach Rivers had a top-five shooting squad as well. “Dirk at the five,” Rivers said. “I would put Durant at the three. Steph at the point, because that’s what you’d need. I would put Kobe in there because of his ability to drive. Now the whole team changes. At the four I couldn’t even come up with one.” Austin contested that Ray Allen should be on his father’s top-five shooting squad, but Doc believed Kobe’s ability to drive superseded the argument. In addition to Kobe’s driving ability, the elder Rivers believed Kobe’s shooting would improve significantly on a squad of good shooters.
Four hours a day, four days a week. That’s all the time Frank Reich and the Colts coaching staff have right now to work with a roster scattered around the country, hunkered down within their homes and scrambling to find ways to get in workouts. But Indianapolis has managed to make its virtual offseason program feel something like the real thing, right down to bringing in a surprise guest, legendary NBA sharpshooter Ray Allen, to speak to the team last week.
Allen came to Boston in 2007 after becoming a sharpshooting star with the Milwaukee Bucks and Seattle Supersonics to join Paul Peirce and Kevin Garnett. The team immediately dominated the NBA, and won the 2008 title in their first season as teammates. But former Celtics big man Kendrick Perkins says Allen’s selfishness may have led to the team’s undoing in 2012. “He had a problem with sacrificing,” Perkins said on the latest edition of the Runnin’ Plays Podcast. “And towards the end, the relationship was damaged.”
“Guys felt like that Ray wasn’t all the way in. And guys saw Ray talking to [LeBron James] and some of the Heat players after the game. And the way that they was rocking at the time … we had a rule in that Celtic locker room, if you wasn’t bleeding green, we wasn’t fooling with you. Offseason we could, but you better not go over there after a game and talk to nobody. And our locker room wasn’t open for people to walk in or none of that. “And during that summer, (Celtics general manager) Danny (Ainge) had a deal on the table for a two-year … I think it was $12 million, $6 million a year for Ray,” Perkins added. “Ray wasn’t calling nobody, he didn’t answer nobody’s phone calls. All of a sudden, he signs a two-year $6 million deal with the Heat. So it’s like a slap in the face, with no warning, no nothing.”
George Karl: Sam (Cassell) and I always had a good relationship. Still do. Glenn (Robinson) is the quiet one so he didn’t he didn’t really know how he felt. And I think Ray (Allen) was the guy that thought I ruined the team. I bring it right down. I mean me by bringing in Anthony Mason. And I think that that relationship did deteriorate. And you know, I think it was the kind of the beginning of players wanting to have relationships with owners and Ray and Senator Kohl and Senator Kohl and Ray’s mom, they always had a really good relationship. And I just felt there was pressure there to divide us in different ways that because of it became more of a distraction. Other than as an amazing was the wrong guy for our team.
George Karl: I mean, the whole the whole thing is, it was a tough situation. You know, and it might have been my leadership, being confrontational to a fault. Anthony Mason was a guy that was confrontational to his to his teammates and to me, and so there was maybe too much confrontation. That created a lot of negative energy that is hard to deal with. I would have to say Ray would prefer not that to be in his locker room. But I mean, I think we all probably made mistakes. I mean, we probably, you know, talked to and said the wrong things.


On July 11, 2012, Ray Allen signed with the Miami Heat and instantly went from loved member of the new Boston Celtics Big 3 to one of Boston’s most hated athletes. He was vilified for joining LeBron James and the champion Heat, rather than stay in Boston and challenge them. On the new Cedric Maxwell podcast, Allen discussed his departure, what lead up to it, and the fallout from his decision.
“I left because there were so many unresolved issues that the team wasn’t considering or willing to change,” Allen said. “As a free agent, you want to know the team is going to do the things you know they need to do. So what is it now? It’s 2020, so you’re talking about nine years, now. I’ve gotten so much hate, death threats, vitriol from Boston fans. Obviously these guys have kind of removed me from the Big 3 and said so many negative things about me and I haven’t had one negative thing to say about any of them.”
Boston no longer became a place he wanted to play. He disagreed with the team’s direction, his relationship with Rondo went astray, and he was even nearly traded in his final year in Boston. “I always explain that we are player that have to decide what’s best for us because the organization moves forward,” Allen said. “They trade you, they get rid of you, they cut you, and so it wasn’t a knock on anybody, it wasn’t disrespectful, I wasn’t mad at anybody when I left, it was simply put. If you’re not moving forward and in the direction that we need as the Allen family then we need to move on and find what we need for ourselves so we can be successful.”
“And so I think he was waffling between us and I think the (Los Angeles) Lakers might’ve been involved and tried to get KG. So it wasn’t until we made that draft-day trade (for Allen). We actually made a trade for KG before, but because KG would not sign a contract extension, I wasn’t going to give up a lot of our young assets just to have KG for one year. So we went on and made a trade for Ray, and then we went back to Minnesota and back to KG, and we were able to work something out. And as the say, the rest is history.”
Garnett said he will not call for his induction to be a ’08 Celtics reunion, but everybody is invited. “That’s not important,” he said Monday. “I wouldn’t dare ask those guys to do that. I’m not a guy to do that. If someone wants to do something on their own, fine. That ’08 team, I have connections with everybody on that team. We will forever be brothers. Nothing more, nothing less. “I don’t want any games. If it’s real, it’s real, if it’s not, it’s not. People who want to show their appreciation for whatever it is, that’s cool. I would never put that on any of those guys. That team, those are bros for life. “That includes Ray.”
Garnett said he’s all for a group gathering, but he wants it to be completely sincere and real. “But if Paul, a lot of guys really want to break bread just dealing with the current state [of the world]. I don’t know. I just don’t think you turn it on like that. I don’t think you are it on and off like that, I’m not really big on that,” Garnett said. “I wish Ray all the best in whatever he’s doing. I wished him [well] when he went [into the Hall of Fame], congratulated him, and kept it moving.
“I’ve been very vocal on my distaste for what Ray did, that was real for everybody that was involved,” Garnett said. “That’s real life. We was in real beef with Miami at the time and very similar to if someone was to go from the Lakers to the Celtics and vice versa. No one will speak on the underlyings of it, but that was a real thing. Miami and Boston. That was a real thing. Yeah, Ray made a decision; I wouldn’t expect Ray to be at anything of mine. And vice versa. If I see him, I’ll speak. I’ll say hello to his family like always and keep it pushing. He knows that decision altered and made us all feel different.”
Ray Allen: I had an awesome time playing in the @acehardware @aceshootout20 to help raise funds for @cmnhospitals back in February. You can vote for me as online fan favorite, and if I win, @nicklaus4kids in Miami will receive a $10,000 donation. Vote now by going to aceshootout.org. Tune into the @golfchannel on March 22 at 5pm ET to watch me play on team basketball with my guy @dwill8. #golfchannel #acehardware #cmnhospitals #nicklauschildrenshospital
Storyline: Coronavirus
The rift remains a spicy topic among NBA fans, and during a recent appearance on the All The Smoke Podcast hosted by former NBA players Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson, Pierce explained why he had an issue with Allen in the first place and how he feels about his former teammate today. “This is my whole deal with Ray. One, he went to our rival,” Pierce said. “LeBron James was a rival of the Celtics, regardless if he was in Cleveland or Miami. Those were some of the [most] heated matchups. It was just like ‘damn, they just beat us, and then you’re going to go over there.'” “Two, I was calling him when [the Celtics] were in the middle of contract negotiations before he left. He’s not answering anybody’s calls and I’m hearing he’s talking about going to Miami. He’s not returning my call. I just feel like as a certain respect as a teammate, as a brother, we can have this conversation. If you’re not wanting to play with us no more, at least let us know something. But to just don’t say nothing to us and to just get up and go over there, I felt that was a slap in the face or disrespect from a brother. So that was my whole beef with him. Since then, me and him have talked, I smoothed things over with him. But initially, as a brother, somebody you’ve been through things with, I felt it was disrespectful.”
The rift remains a spicy topic among NBA fans, and during a recent appearance on the All The Smoke Podcast hosted by former NBA players Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson, Pierce explained why he had an issue with Allen in the first place and how he feels about his former teammate today. “This is my whole deal with Ray. One, he went to our rival,” Pierce said. “LeBron James was a rival of the Celtics, regardless if he was in Cleveland or Miami. Those were some of the [most] heated matchups. It was just like ‘damn, they just beat us, and then you’re going to go over there.'” “Two, I was calling him when [the Celtics] were in the middle of contract negotiations before he left. He’s not answering anybody’s calls and I’m hearing he’s talking about going to Miami. He’s not returning my call. I just feel like as a certain respect as a teammate, as a brother, we can have this conversation. If you’re not wanting to play with us no more, at least let us know something. But to just don’t say nothing to us and to just get up and go over there, I felt that was a slap in the face or disrespect from a brother. So that was my whole beef with him. Since then, me and him have talked, I smoothed things over with him. But initially, as a brother, somebody you’ve been through things with, I felt it was disrespectful.”
Ainge, appearing on 98.5 The Sports Hub’s “Toucher and Rich” on Wednesday, said that he is still friendly with Allen, but while he “no longer holds any grudge against Allen […] that’s not the exact same feeling of everybody in the organization.” “We get along great,” Ainge said. “I’m a big, big fan of Ray. I’ll always be grateful to Ray for the championship that he gave us.”
After five seasons with the Celtics from 2007-12, Allen entered free agency and rejected a reported two-year, $12 million deal from the Celtics, instead accepting a three-year contract with the rival Miami Heat, where he won a championship in 2013. “These are not my decisions,” Ainge said. “So if someone asks my opinion on this, I’ll weigh in at the appropriate time. But this is [Celtics owner Wyc Grousbeck]’s team and he gets to make those decisions.”
I had this deadline column and the wonder of Tim and how awesome he is, grabbing this ring against this supposed dynasty in Miami and then I got to rewrite! What do you remember about that night and when Ray steps back and hits that three? Mike Breen: Well, a couple of things you never forget. You never forget the NBA bringing out the ropes, because the game is about to be over and they’re going to crown a champion that night. For them to do that ahead of time, they have to do that, I think that’s the first thing I remember. The second thing I remember, the fans leaving. And even though, I’ve seen too many games over time. I’ve seen Reggie Miller eight points in 8.9 seconds. I never understand, especially in a big game, how fans leave early, in a game that’s not decided. Because a lot of fans left. In fact, a lot of them tried to come back in. Our crew did a great job that night. They had a shot outside the arena of people trying to get back in but they couldn’t. The doors were locked.
Having gone through similar camps when they were growing up in Maywood, the Browns understand what it means to young people to have the attention of NBA players. “I remember going to Michael Finley’s and Tim Hardaway’s basketball camps and guys would come around and interact with us,” said Shannon. “They shook our hands, talking to us, bringing in guys like Ray Allen and Jamal Crawford. It’s huge that [the kids] get to feel the same thing because I know for me personally, they gave us hope.”
Over the past five games, Temple has made 18 of 40 3-pointers. “Most guys who are role players, they kind of stick in their role. He’s playing like Ray Allen,” Atkinson said following Saturday’s practice. “One of our emphases to him was, ‘We need you to shoot more 3s. You’re a hell of a shooter. Shoot more.’ But the ball-handling, the defense, another guy who is a better player than I thought he was.”
“I talked to Ray Allen during the summer,” Beal said. “He was in Milwaukee and Seattle and those years were rugged you know, they weren’t always great but he was one of the best players and he was always making sure those teams were in the playoffs or making some type of noise. “He was like, ‘Ultimately it’s your decision. The only person that can make Brad happy is Brad, and you have to what’s best for you,'” Beal said.
It wasn’t until Allen’s age-32 season with the Celtics where Allen finally won a championship. It’s not the career path many superstars are interested in nowadays, but Beal seems ready to make the most of the hand he’s been dealt in Washington. “It was kind of a no-brainer, just duke it out and make it work,” Beal said. “My leadership has to grow, it’s kind of growing every day, but I feel like I have a natural knack for it. “You can’t think about, ‘Is the grass greener on the other side? Are we not going to be as good here?’ You can’t necessarily think in those terms because you can always play ‘Devil’s Advocate’ on the other side, so for me, it’s just sticking to your guns.”
“I had a conversation with (Ainge) and I told him this was my last-ditch effort. I would’ve went back,” Allen said on WEEI’s “Ordway, Merloni & Fauria” radio show. “This was when Kevin Durant was a free agent. He was thinking about going to Boston. And I said, ‘Hey, if you guys land Kevin, I would certainly look at lacing them back up one more time and try to make something good happen here in Boston.’