Shake Milton Rumors

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#18
Shake Milton
Shake Milton
Position: C
Born: 09/26/96
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:205 lbs. / 93 kg.
Salary: $1,445,697
There is one thing that stood out other than Warren going nuclear and that was a heated exchange between Joel Embiid and Shake Milton at the end of the first quarter. It was clear that some words were said and Milton had to be held back by his teammates on the bench. However, Embiid brushed it off and said it was nothing. “It’s basketball,” Embiid explained. “Everybody makes mistakes, it happens. We have to come in and get better. We discussed what’s going on and we move on and find a solution. It’s nothing.”
Sometimes it can be beneficial for a team to have those types of exchanges as it can be good for teams to fight sometimes and air their grievances. “You don’t go cheerleading stuff like that all the time, but if a conversation needs to be had, it’s going to be had,” said coach Brett Brown. “I actually think stuff like that is probably more healthy than anything. Shake’s teammates love Shake Milton. They’re proud of his evolution and then you got an NBA All-Star in Joel Embiid who has an idea and I don’t know the full detail, but for the most part, it’s healthy. Those two will move on quickly.”
Noah Levick: Norvel Pelle compares the NBA’s Orlando plan to when he played overseas in Taiwan — mostly just staying in his room and playing basketball. Pelle says he’ll try to be the Sixers’ “No. 1 cheerleader” when on the bench to help compensate for no fans being in attendance. He rates himself as the Sixers’ No. 1 “energy guy” on the bench, with Matisse Thybulle, Kyle O’Quinnn and Shake Milton behind him.
It was mildly surprising to hear second-year guard Shake Milton take the strongest stance when it came to the NBA’s decision to resume the season. “I don’t really think we should be playing,” Milton said in a video conference call with reporters Tuesday, “but I think the NBA is doing all that they can to make the environment as safe as possible. My teammates want to play so we’re going to go down there and try to win.”
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
When asked why specifically he thought the league shouldn’t resume play, he provided a poignant response. “I think [the spread of the virus], and then also I feel like there’s a lot of other stuff going on,” Milton said. “There are issues going on right now in the world that are way bigger than a sport, way bigger than the game of basketball. I feel like we’re on the cusp of finally having people tune in and really try to listen and try to understand more about the things that are happening in our country. I feel like the moment is too big right now and I don’t want the game of basketball to overshadow it.”
This is material for Brett Brown, too. He has one more year left on his contract. If Simmons is limited or out the rest of the way and Philadelphia ends up 5th or 6th in the East and out in the first round, does Elton Brand give Brown another extension? Does he let him coach as a lame duck next season? Does he replace him this summer? Philadelphia expected a title contender. At least if Simmons were healthy for the stretch run, Brown would have a chance to figure this out and press ahead. It’s hard to see how that happens with Shake Milton and Raul Neto running the point.
Storyline: Brett Brown Hot Seat?
You’ve played alongside so many NBA players while in college, too. Are you still in touch with them? JF: I’ve played alongside Sterling Brown, Shake Milton, Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye and I’m in touch with all of them. The person I talk to the most is Shake, he was my roommate for three years in college. We talk on the phone every day and all of us have a group message where we share daily devotionals. All of them have their own way of helping me. They’re all great guys who have given me advice about becoming and staying a pro. They keep me focused on the task at hand and what’s to come in the future. They all believe in me. I also talk to my former teammate Sedrick Barefield who transferred and that’s my guy. I am so happy to see him persevere and be the player he was in college. He works so hard and has the right mind and he has a bright future. It’s a big family.