Steve Nash Rumors

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Steve Nash
Steve Nash
Position: -
Born: 02/07/74
Height: 6-3 / 1.91
Weight:195 lbs. / 88.5 kg.
Earnings: $146,936,620 ($183,777,470*)
He’s 45. He looks tanned, if not rested. He says it took him two years to fully mourn the end of his own career: late in his career he realized he had been suppressing his emotions for a long time to keep from getting distracted, so the mourning was a part of learning how to feel properly again. And now he is still figuring out his second life. “I get asked to do stuff every day,” Nash says. “But I have to keep my sanity and the sanctity of the family, so I try to say no, but the reality is that even with those parameters and goals, I still end up with a pretty full schedule. So I’m constantly trying to refine it: where am I making an impact, where could I be making a bigger impact? And I’m still kind of in a transition stage, to be fair. It’s been five years since I retired, but I’m still transitioning to … what is it that I really want to do?”
“I do know what I like, but it’s almost like I’m in my infancy now, and figuring out who I am.” It’s jarring, in a way. Nash has always been someone who seemed to know where he was and where he wanted to go. He founded his production company while still a player; he started his organizational association with Canada Basketball while still with the Phoenix Suns, before he was general manager of the program for five years. Great career. He seemed ready. He wasn’t. And now the Victoria, B.C., product is trying the things he feels are irreplaceable chances.
Sometimes he sees a highlight from his two-MVP, Hall of Fame NBA career, his hair flopping around as he built one of the great point guard careers. What he sees is another country, another time. It barely feels like him. “The old adage, every athlete dies twice, really helped me,” Nash says over an organic beer at a downtown Toronto hotel. “When I see a clip of myself on Instagram now, I don’t even really relate to that person. It’s kind of like, like I don’t feel me doing those things. It’s almost like it’s someone else.”
Now he is still figuring out his second life. “I get asked to do stuff every day,” Nash says. “But I have to keep my sanity and the sanctity of the family, so I try to say no, but the reality is that even with those parameters and goals, I still end up with a pretty full schedule. So I’m constantly trying to refine it: where am I making an impact, where could I be making a bigger impact? And I’m still kind of in a transition stage, to be fair. It’s been five years since I retired, but I’m still transitioning to … what is it that I really want to do?”