Steve Nash Rumors

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Steve Nash
Steve Nash
Position: -
Born: 02/07/74
Height: 6-3 / 1.91
Weight:195 lbs. / 88.5 kg.
Earnings: $146,936,620 ($183,777,470*)
Paul’s 55.7 percent on 2-point field goals is the best, and it’s by a significant margin over Nash’s 54 percent. Nash is one of the greatest shooters in NBA history, a player whose shotmaking ability improved with age. From age 33 to 35, Nash posted three consecutive seasons of 50 percent from the field, 40 percent from 3-point range and 90 percent from the free-throw line. Nash said Paul’s success into his 30s is pretty simple. “He’s talented. He’s diligent. He’s worked extremely hard at his craft,” Nash told The Athletic. “Now he has experience as well.
It’s why Billups and Nash think Paul will be ready whenever the NBA returns. Nash said he believes a return to play will be difficult for older players, but not Paul. “The younger guys have more of an ability to take some time off and bounce back quickly,” Nash said. “The older guys have to maintain through this. They have to maintain and stay sharp, especially as you get into your mid-30s — use it or lose it. “But I have no doubt the top players like Chris are extremely dedicated and finding a way through their experience to stay sharp, regardless of the limitations a quarantine would bring.”
However, we can enjoy Nash’s opinion of what it was like to play under the ownership of Cuban. “Playing for Mark was incredible,” Nash said on Showtime Basketball’s ‘All the Smoke.’ “Mark could in some ways get under your skin at times, but he was such a pioneering person for the game. Pushing the envelope on everything – the rules, the way we went about things, refereeing.” If there was any bad blood (and there was), it seems it has turned to water under the bridge. And there is no arguing that Cuban is still a powerful voice in the NBA.
On a side note related to ESPN’s “The Last Dance” docuseries that in terms of eyeballs continues to rule the sports world, Nash’s gives his insight into Michael Jordan and his career. “He just had this charisma on top of all the gifts and skills and mentally, you know how great he is,” Nash said. “Playing against him, the one thing that I think he was unlike any other player I’ve played against is that there was a real fear playing against him. “I’ve never seen the league be kinda fearful of a player or have that much reverence for a player.”

Steve Nash struggled with retirement

Steve Nash: First and foremost, retirements hard and I don’t know how you guys dealt with it. You know, it took me two years to really be like, “Okay, I’m good now.” And I was lucky because the end of my career was a nightmare trying to stay healthy trying to play when I was here at the Lakers. It was like, I train twice a day for over two years trying to give myself a chance to contribute. Eventually, you know, I realized it wasn’t happening and my body just had too many miles on it.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 4 more rumors
Steve Nash: When I struggled for those last two years, I think it allowed me to start to, you know, recognize that this is going to be difficult. It took me two years to really get through the other side where I felt whole, but a lot of that was due to the fact that I wasn’t like, you know, it wasn’t a terrible two years, but it was like I could tell you know, like I’m transitioning still, I’m still trying to come to grips with this. Like, there’s something missing, like something’s pulling me and I can’t fulfill it.
Steve Nash, former Mavericks great and two-time NBA MVP, recently joined SHOWTIME Basketball’s All The Smoke podcast with former NBA players Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson to talk all things hoops. Here are some highlights: On being traded to Dallas in 1998… Nash: “At first I didn’t want to go. I love Phoenix. It was great down there. A great city, organization. It just felt great. Felt like home. … Dallas was one of the worst teams in the league. I got traded there on draft day when Dirk [Nowitzki] got drafted by the Mavs, we played in the old Reunion Arena, and it wasn’t in the same place that Phoenix was at the time. So, in a sense it was like a step down. “Then, we had the lockout that year. I remember I was playing a pickup game like a week before training camp, and I got knocked out of the air going to the basket and landed on my back — and I struggled that whole year. And that’s when I realized that I had back problems was that season … that’s when they really presented themselves and became a problem. So, I struggled the first lockout year, struggled a little bit the second year, and then Dirk and I, I think, turned a corner. Mark Cuban bought the team, and the Mavericks became one of the places to be, so to speak.”
“I was always a pass-first guy. So, I tried to make this thing work. So, the first part of the season, half of the season my numbers were really down, but the second half of the season I think I shot over 50% and played well. But I think it was like a sign to Mark Cuban that maybe he thought I was coming to the end because I didn’t have the full year I had prior. “That summer, he really didn’t make a big effort to keep me. I think he thought he didn’t want to overpay — I think he’d overpaid a few guys, and didn’t want to overpay an aging point guard — and that’s how I ended up in Phoenix, really. I don’t think he was confident in my future at that point.”
Steve Nash, former Mavericks great and two-time NBA MVP, recently joined SHOWTIME Basketball’s All The Smoke podcast with former NBA players Matt Barnes and Stephen Jackson to talk all things hoops. Here are some highlights: On being traded to Dallas in 1998… Nash: “At first I didn’t want to go. I love Phoenix. It was great down there. A great city, organization. It just felt great. Felt like home. … Dallas was one of the worst teams in the league. I got traded there on draft day when Dirk [Nowitzki] got drafted by the Mavs, we played in the old Reunion Arena, and it wasn’t in the same place that Phoenix was at the time. So, in a sense it was like a step down. “Then, we had the lockout that year. I remember I was playing a pickup game like a week before training camp, and I got knocked out of the air going to the basket and landed on my back — and I struggled that whole year. And that’s when I realized that I had back problems was that season … that’s when they really presented themselves and became a problem. So, I struggled the first lockout year, struggled a little bit the second year, and then Dirk and I, I think, turned a corner. Mark Cuban bought the team, and the Mavericks became one of the places to be, so to speak.”
“I was always a pass-first guy. So, I tried to make this thing work. So, the first part of the season, half of the season my numbers were really down, but the second half of the season I think I shot over 50% and played well. But I think it was like a sign to Mark Cuban that maybe he thought I was coming to the end because I didn’t have the full year I had prior. “That summer, he really didn’t make a big effort to keep me. I think he thought he didn’t want to overpay — I think he’d overpaid a few guys, and didn’t want to overpay an aging point guard — and that’s how I ended up in Phoenix, really. I don’t think he was confident in my future at that point.”
The Warriors drafted Curry in 2009, when Kerr was the Phoenix Suns’ general manager. Kerr frequently saw flashes of Suns guard Steve Nash in Curry, particularly with their athleticism. To illustrate that point, Kerr told the story of one occasion when Nash visited him in San Diego to surf along the region’s sunny shores. Kerr, an admitted novice surfer, made a point to teach Nash, who’d never picked up a board, a few tricks. “Hey, just paddle into this,” Kerr said to Nash, “What you want to do is you turn the board and you paddle, and then you kind of stand, you try to stand up and you pop up real quick. And it’s probably going to take a few times.”
Nash picked it up on his first try. “He’s like, ‘OK.’ First wave comes, he paddles twice, he pops up, he surfs the thing all the way into the shore,” Kerr said. “I’m like, ‘It took me three weeks to do that.’ “Nash and Steph are exactly the same way. You put a ball on a stick in their hand, whatever needs to be done, they’re going to figure out a way to do it.”
Gilbert Arenas: Okay okay basketball world I need answers here…from 2005-07 i ranked #1 in 8 out of 10 categories in my position, which clearly says I was the goat in my position 😜 @stevenash won 2 mvps in this same time frame 🤔 if u (add )his two mvps/(subtract) one mvp trophy from him /(divide) MY wins VS my TEAMS team loses, becuz I neva lost 😬/ if u (carry) all that like I carried my team😇 @stevenash owes me one of those mvp trophies 😂😂 (math don’t lie)🙌🏾💯 Steve do u have amazon prime?😇 #theresnoiinteam there’s No WE either #arenasmvp sounds nice 🤔 😊

Marc Stein: Last straw: After a loss that dropped Dallas to 3-9, Rodman blasted Cuban for being too close to the team “like Jerry Jones” and ripped virtually everyone on the roster by saying the Mavs needed “a backup center, a starting center, a true power forward, a couple of guards.” Rodman, 38, was abruptly waived. Cuban was (narrowly) approved as an NBA owner by some uneasy peers a month later. The following season Dallas halted a playoff drought that spanned a decade with the first of 11 50-win seasons in a row, led by Dirk, Steve Nash and Michael Finley
Steve Nash: Thank you, Kobe! We came in the league together and went out around the same time. Glad we got to be teammates but really cherish the competition. A TON of battles but game 6, 2010 Western Conference Finals you were truly unplayable. It wasn’t always easy and we didn’t always see eye to eye but the respect between us means more than all the numbers and accolades stacked on top of each other. Looking back I draw a lot of inspiration from the way you attacked everything you did and even more admiration from the father you were and family you grew. Gone way way way too soon but never ever forgotten. Rest In Peace old friend with your Angel, Gigi. 2/24♾
Or, remember that almost every prominent passer in NBA history collected more assists at home than on the road? One of the few exceptions is Steve Nash, who recorded 0.4 more assists per game on the road than at home. In Nash’s heyday, Phoenix employed one of the least-friendly scorekeeping crews for assists. Had he enjoyed a typical home bias over his career, he would have retired with upwards of 500 more career assists than he did, and he would move ahead of Jason Kidd (who enjoyed a typical 11 percent home-court assist advantage in his career) for eighth on the all-time assists-per-game leaderboard.
You’ve said several times that you were obsessed with the NBA in the past. Why did you use to think like that? Facundo Campazzo: It was kind of an obsession for me until some years ago. Right now, I’m very calm about it. It was a teenage dream that one has, growing up and watching the NBA. Players like Jason Kidd and Steve Nash could make you fall in love with basketball whenever you turned on the television. At the age of 10-12, I used to say that it would be like a fantasy dream for me to play there. Now, I feel very calm with my presence in Madrid. If it comes, let it come. If not, I’ll try to become the best version of myself.
Storyline: Facundo Campazzo Free Agency
As recently as the 1990s, the NBA moved at a deliberate pace. Walk it up, feed your star, watch him work. Jordan’s final title-winning Bulls team averaged 96.7 points per game. Slowly, the game sped up. It began with Steve Nash and Mike D’Antoni in Phoenix. Then came the Warriors. Today, it’s not anomalous for a team to win 159–158, as the Rockets did last month. But in 2014–15, when Arseneault arrived in Reno, the NBA was still evolving into a pace-and-space league. The most prolific team the year before, the Clippers, averaged 107.9 points. Today that would rank 23rd in the league. Arseneault was bewildered by how he’d gotten the job. The Kings had flown him out, without asking for a résumé. Only later would he learn how they had found him: how Oliver, an analytics guru, had taken the advice of a fan named Jack Patton, a devotee of the System. How Oliver had grabbed Arseneault’s contact info off the Web. How Sacramento brass had interviewed roughly 10 other candidates but focused on him because, as Oliver says, “We really wanted to experiment.”
“I think he’s maybe the best 20-year-old the NBA has ever seen,” Nash said on Doncic in an interview for NBA Cafe Barcelona. “The game’s a little different than when Lebron came in the league. The numbers are little inflated because of the pace and the hand check. But still. I don’t think Lebron was so gifted but I don’t think he was as polished as Luka at 20. Now, Luka’s never going to be the athlete that Lebron is, but he’s a great athlete. He’s an underrated athlete.”
“He’s going to be a Hall of Fame player if he stays healthy,” Nash added. The question is, will Luka top Dirk Nowitzki as the best European player of all time. “It’s possible. For sure,” Nash, a teammate of Nowitzki from 1998 to 2004, said. “Especially when you look at Dirk at 20. Dirk was amazing at 20. But compared to Luka? Because physically he was catching up. Luka’s already there physically.”
He currently ranks 10th with 8,879 assists, but he will soon surpass Gary Payton (8,966), Isiah Thomas (9,061) and perhaps even Chris Paul (9,290) this season. Assuming he maintains his season average of 11 per game, James should top Payton and Thomas at some point in the middle of this season. Paul, who is currently with the Oklahoma City Thunder in his 15th season, has stayed healthy and productive thus far. Considering Paul’s extensive injury history though, James could make up enough ground to climb ahead of his close friend either late this season or early next season. James should also eclipse Oscar Robertson (9,887 assists) next season and Magic Johnson (10,141), Mark Jackson (10,334) and Steve Nash (10,335) in two years. It seems like a stretch James could surpass Jason Kidd (12,091) and John Stockton (15,806). “I’ve been fortunate to be able to play with great teammates and great coaches in three great organizations so far in my career,” James said. “I just hope I make anyone who has followed my career proud.”
“I enjoyed it as I kid. What I really like about it now, it is so like basketball. Players who played soccer growing up, they’re better passers. Steve Nash. Unbelievable passer. Toni Kukoc was a beautiful passer. I would watch Toni coming to practice and he was kicking the ball around. He’d juggle the ball on his knees, rest the ball on the back of his neck. And he loved it. And there’s no question in my mind that he was influenced by football. “(Kids) understand the concept of triangles. They understand the concept of passing the ball, and cutting behind the man defending. That’s what football is. Find the angles, creating opportunities, creating scoring chances.”
“I definitely try to model my game as much as I can to Steve,” Young said when asked to name his personal top five of all-time point guards. “Obviously I loved watching Steph growing up. Growing up in Oklahoma City, I’ve been a big Russ (Westbrook) fan. Dame Lillard. Probably Kyrie (Irving) – as far as guys where I try to model my game (after them). It’s the little things that they have that I try to add to my game.”
It would be one thing for Young to declare Steve Nash the best point guard of all time. But ask him about the Greatest Player of All Time debate – MJ, LeBron, Wilt, Magic, Kareem? – and it’s quite another to hear him say that his answer doesn’t change. “If anybody asks me who the best player of all time is, I tell them Steve Nash,” Young said. “That’s my favorite player, and it’s always been my favorite player.”
The former Suns players reunited in the latest episode of Q-Rich’s The Knuckleheads podcast, where Richardson detailed a story of how Nash took a pay cut just so he join the team in 2004. According to Richardson, then Suns executives David Griffin and Rex Chapman were having trouble balancing the salary cap to fit Richardson’s contract before Nash decided to step in. “He was like, ‘Take it off mine,’” Richardson said. “I turned to him and look like, ‘Wait a minute.’ Right then, I’ll never forget that, I remember calling (my agent), and he was like, ‘He did what?’
Kerr used as examples Steve Nash, one of the most well-known basketball players with soccer in his background, and Toni Kukoč. Nash, a Canadian, and Kukoč of Croatia were known for their ability to see the court and Kerr believes their passing prowess stems from playing soccer in their youth. “They understand the concept of triangles, they understand the concept of passing the ball and cutting behind the man defending, right?” Kerr said. “That’s what football is: Finding angles, creating opportunities, creating scoring chances.”
Justin Kubatko: The @Indiana Pacers Malcolm Brogdon is the fifth player since the ABA-NBA merger to record at least 15 points and 10 assists in each of his first four games of a season. He joins: * Magic Johnson (1988-89) * Gary Payton (2000-01) * Steve Nash (2006-07) * Chris Paul (2008-09, 2013-14) pic.twitter.com/0GpQqPQU4W