Theo Ratliff Rumors

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Theo Ratliff
Theo Ratliff
Position: -
Born: 04/17/73
Height: 6-10 / 2.08
Weight:229 lbs. / 104.3 kg.
Earnings: $102,351,958 ($141,121,413*)
We talked about how much the game has changed, but are there any active players who sort of remind you of yourself? Theo Ratliff: Yeah, I think the guy we, the Hawks, just acquired: Clint Capela. He definitely mirrors my mentality and approach to the game. He’s not a guy who really worries about being a major part of the offense, but he’s always looking to help his teammates by blocking shots and rebounding the ball.
In today’s NBA, big men are being forced to evolve and the Houston Rockets are even going away from centers entirely. What are your thoughts on how the NBA is changing? Theo Ratliff: I think the game has definitely changed. Back in my day, everything was kind of based on the big man being dominant in the post. With the evolution of analytics and their calculations that have people shooting more three-pointers and more layups and not really focusing on their mid-range game or post-ups, it has really changed the game. Plus, you have so much more open space now and you can’t armbar guys, you can’t check guys who are coming down the middle and different things of that nature. It opens up the lanes so much because they’re taking so much away as far as what the defense can do.
You have the 22nd-most blocks in NBA history. You need to have great timing and instincts to be an elite shot-blocker. Can you teach those things or is it one of those things where you either have it or you don’t? Theo Ratliff: Oh, you can definitely develop it. It’s all about muscle memory and timing and visualization. I was just talking to a guy today about how to master whatever it is that you do and it’s all about visualization – seeing things before they happen. Also, doing a lot of studying of other players and their tendencies, where the ball will be in certain offenses, who likes to drive versus who likes to post and different things in the game that help you visualize how you’re going to play against that specific opponent and where you need to be to help.
Theo Ratliff: You’re talking about a tremendous competitor. To this day, I still don’t know how he did the things that he did and how he was able to push through certain injuries. When he sprained his ankle, it looked like he broke his ankle, but then he’d be right back out here. His will and determination and pain tolerance was right up there with Kobe. He was just able to will himself to do certain things. When we were down, we knew where to go. We’d find him, he’d find the ball, and he would just take over games. Just from his leadership on the floor, that helped us be at our best. We had a lot of guys who were just kind of journeyman guys who hadn’t really stepped out and came into their own when we came over to the Sixers to play alongside him – guys like Aaron McKie, Eric Snow, George Lynch. He helped push us and elevated our game and our status as NBA players. He’s a tremendous guy, a tremendous person as well. Very giving, very family-oriented. He takes his time, even to this day, to speak to your kids and give his story and talk about what he did and the ups and downs of his life. He’s just a tremendous individual.
Shyatt said “none of this is surprising to me” that Nance became Wyoming’s first player selected in the NBA Draft since Theo Ratliff in 1995. “He’s always had a mature approach to the game,” Schyatt said. “Watching tape now, he’s starting to have a game so to speak. He was sort of a guy without a game. He had all these pieces. He could leap. He could run. He could talk. He could think. Now it’s sort of neat watching him put that together.”
Atlanta police and the Atlanta Chapter of the National Basketball Retired Players Association and Morehouse College hosted a free, day-long summit on Saturday. The event focused on youth, ages 8-16, that featured candid talk about youth concerns. Members of the Atlanta Police Gang Unit and retired NBA players spoke to the group during several workshops. The event was held at Morehouse College’s Forbes Arena.