Trae Young Rumors

All NBA Players
#11
Trae Young
Trae Young
Position: G
Born: 09/19/98
Height: 6-1 / 1.85
Weight:180 lbs. / 81.6 kg.
Salary: $6,571,800
During a league office Competition Committee call on Dec. 30, Pierce was among a couple of members who spoke out about the way certain players are able to draw fouls and, at times, bait officials into making foul calls. Multiple sources said he spoke about how he “hates” the shots Young takes at times and the fouls he’s able to draw on them. It was perceived as an interesting comment for several people on the call because Pierce’s star player has seemingly taken advantage of drawing fouls and getting to the foul line. But it was made in the broader picture of how players are drawing fouls by manipulating their bodies.
What about Heat wing Jimmy Butler, Bucks wing Khris Middleton, Heat big Bam Adebayo, Hawks guard Trae Young or Bucks guard Jrue Holiday? Ethan Skolnick of Five Reasons Sports Network: “For those who were sort of questioning why Jimmy wasn’t named to the All-Star team when Durant went out and it was Sabonis, I can tell you that the NBA wanted to name him to the All-Star team.” “You know basically what he made known to the NBA?” “He wasn’t going unless Bam was going.”
Young hit the Brooklyn Nets with the move on Dec. 30. Nets head coach Steve Nash was not a fan. “That’s not basketball!” Nash yelled at the officials. Nash’s criticism went viral, and Young and the Hawks defended the star guard’s tactic while others debated and discussed its fairness. “I learned a lot about drawing fouls from [Nash],” Young told reporters in early January. “If he says it’s not basketball, he must’ve been saying it about himself because he’s done it a couple of times throughout his career and was so successful.”
There are plays like Reggie Miller’s scissorkick, where he’d cleverly leave one leg hanging out on a jumper for a defender to potentially clip. It was irritating, and in 2012, seven years after Miller retired the league implemented, you guessed it, “The Reggie Miller Rule,” that made it an offensive foul to leave a leg out. By next season, we might be talking about “The Trae Young Rule.” But until the league legislates it out of the game, it’s fair play. And it’s up to the players to discover counters.