Will Barton Rumors

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Will Barton
Will Barton
Position: G
Born: 01/06/91
Height: 6-5 / 1.96
Weight:175 lbs. / 79.4 kg.
Salary: $12,776,786
And now, as the NBA contemplates an unprecedented return amid a global pandemic and boiling racial unrest following the death of George Floyd when in the custody of Minneapolis police, the Nuggets’ veteran is beyond tired. Tired of witnessing the same cycle, over and over. “I don’t see us going down there and wearing George Floyd T-shirts before the games and then after a game, being interviewed, saying we need to change,” Barton told The Denver Post in a wide-ranging interview. “I’ll tell you right now, I don’t really see that helping. I feel like it’s too late in the ballgame. We’ve been going through this for 400-plus years now. I feel like the only way for real change is going to come is a revolution.”
Barton, while not calling for violence, distilled his message further by posing a hypothetical question he wanted all white people to ask themselves: “If Black people in America were to say today, ‘We’re going to war. We’re going to war, not with white people, (but) with racist America. Would you stand and fight with Black people against racists or would you be out of the way? Would you put your life on the line for a black person for what’s right or what’s wrong?”
With starter Will Barton absent (personal), Beasley clocked 25-plus minutes for the third time this season, plus crunch-time play at the end. You can chalk it up as a bittersweet achievement. “I wish it (playing time) was consistent, that’s just me as a player,” Beasley said. “But I’m happy to contribute to the team and get a win, that’s the most important thing that comes out of every day.”

Nuggets standing pat?

And what seems even more clear as Jokic wades deep into his third season of playing alongside Jamal Murray, Gary Harris, Will Barton and Paul Millsap is that any move shaking up Denver’s starters appears increasingly unlikely — and unwarranted. In conversations with numerous people around the team, there has been a strong sense of optimism about where Denver sits. No one thinks this team has hit its stride just yet. But Jokic has returned to MVP candidate form, players like Harris are finding their footing, and shots have largely begun to fall.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 7 more rumors
Barton has bounced back in the best of ways, becoming one of the Nuggets’ most consistent players. He entered this week averaging 15 points, 6.8 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 32.5 minutes per game for the 17-8 Nuggets, who held off the Knicks 111-105 on Sunday night. He is a more focused Will Barton, a more determined Will Barton. He has been revitalized by his low point, and all of that helps the Nuggets. “He’s been tremendous,” Denver coach Michael Malone said. “I think he’s contributing in so many ways. And that’s what you love about Will.”
Malone met with Barton after practice the day after Game 2. He sat Barton down and told him his decision to switch up the starting five. “I told him I didn’t agree with it, but I will do whatever he feels is best for the team and I will accept it and do my best in that role,” Barton said. “But that’s another challenge. You get booed, you get benched and all those things prepared me for this. … All this shit is about challenges and how you embrace things and get through it. I wanted to show people that I’m strong and I won’t break. That happened last year, but watch how I come back.”
Just because the twilight of Carmelo Anthony’s career has been more turbulent than the start, doesn’t make him any less significant to basketball lore. “The NBA is tricky, man, you never know,” said Nuggets veteran Will Barton, whose career began in Portland, the same place Anthony’s career now resides. “Guy that’s a Hall of Famer, one of the best players probably to play this game; it’s crazy that it took that long (to get back), but things happen.”
Throughout Anthony’s basketball odyssey, and especially as his career has wandered, there were always persistent claims questioning his effort or suggesting he wasn’t a team player. Barton, who said Anthony was a top-five basketball player in the world in his prime, wouldn’t stand for that. “The outside world is not in the NBA,” Barton said. “Like fans, and stuff like that, could portray him that way and just ridicule him in the media and stuff like that, social media. It’s crazy the disrespect a guy that good gets on social media. You look on Twitter and Instagram, they’re kind of always clowning him. But real basketball heads know how good that guy is and he’s a special talent. It’s crazy that some of the kids in this generation are going to think of him in that way because he’s really good, and he was really good in his prime.”
“The outside world is not in the NBA,” Barton said. “Like fans, and stuff like that, could portray him that way and just ridicule him in the media and stuff like that, social media. It’s crazy the disrespect a guy that good gets on social media. You look on Twitter and Instagram, they’re kind of always clowning him. But real basketball heads know how good that guy is and he’s a special talent. It’s crazy that some of the kids in this generation are going to think of him in that way because he’s really good, and he was really good in his prime.”
“We didn’t give Jamal any screens, any outlets,” Nikola Jokic said. “We didn’t give him any kind of exit. We didn’t execute well.” This isn’t what the Nuggets wanted to happen, and it sure isn’t what they expected to happen. “We knew we weren’t supposed to lose this game, and that’s no disrespect to the Kings, but we weren’t supposed to lose today,” said Will Barton, who finished the game with 14 points. “We just have to be better.”
A slow start to camp had no bearing on Barton’s jovial mood. Barton has been limited by a nagging hamstring injury he sustained during the team’s open gyms in September. He claimed it was nothing serious and that he just “strained it a bit.” But he acknowledged the setback has been frustrating. “Definitely a little deflating, coming off an injury-plagued season last year,” Barton said. “The good thing is I feel good when I’m out there, I’m real confident, I’m not really holding back very much. Doing the things I like to do. Got a good rhythm, so not too depressed, but it is a little deflating because I don’t want to hold back, I want to be able to practice fully and play fully and do everything.”
Harrison Wind: Will Barton hasn’t been a full participant at training camp yet. He’s dealing with an injury that’s unrelated to last year’s hip/groin but hasn’t been doing full contact drills. Michael Malone said Torrey Craig/Juancho Hernangomez have been getting runs with the first unit.
Storyline: Will Barton Injury
He said he felt compelled to help young basketball careers in his hometown. That started the relationship with Jarace, who has played AAU basketball in Baltimore for years with coach Mookie Dobbins. “Will has definitely had an impact on me. That’s my big brother, for real,” Jarace said. “He’s definitely taught me a lot, definitely been pushing me harder. He’s teaching me to make the right decisions on and off the court, like taking care of my body.”
For a nearly six-year stretch, beginning more than a dozen years ago, NBA players — and those working their way up to those ranks — used to come down to hoop on humid, summer nights at Barry Farm. The no-frills, hard-as-its-neighborhood court in the heart of one of D.C.’s most deprived, crime-ridden communities provided two irresistible benefits: a good run and the possibility of some hood love. But NBA stars don’t come around anymore. It’s been more than two years since Bradley Beal and Will Barton showed up as the last vestiges of a glorious, bygone, logo-stamped era, and Rawls doesn’t expect that to change anytime soon, if ever. With most Goodman League fans making it known they want some good games — with or without household names — Rawls has come to accept that. Because even if someone from the Washington Wizards or one of the many talents the region has pumped into the NBA decides to come down to Southeast and lace ’em up for the people, that magical, euphoric period won’t ever be duplicated.