The three-year deal is worth $5 million per season, acc…

The three-year deal is worth $5 million per season, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. The person spoke to USA TODAY Sports on the condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak publicly on the matter.

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The NBA announced last month that it would be the first league among the four major sports to allow advertising on regular season uniforms as part of a three-year trial approved by owners. Teams will be allowed to sell advertising in the form of a patch, approximately 2 ½ inches x 2 ½ inches, beginning in the 2017-18 season, coinciding with Nike’s new deal with the league. “First off, hats off to Adam Silver,” Sixers CEO Scott O’Neil told USA TODAY Sports. “He’s a commissioner who will take opportunities and will make the right decision and sometimes the tough decision and he continues to lead through policy. He gives teams the opportunity to drive our business.”
Sports Business Journal reports Monday that it's unclear how much revenue the NBA will bring in from jersey ads -- which it describes as "smaller than a standard Post-it note" -- but Brett Yormark believes the Nets could rake in between $4 million and $6 million a year from what he calls "naming rights for your team."
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July 2, 2022 | 11:57 pm EDT Update

76ers, Mavericks also listed as suitors for Kyrie Irving

Kevin Gray Jr: “Kyrie Irving has several suitors involved Lakers, Sixers & Mavericks, keep an eye out in the next couple of weeks…” per Shams Charania #MFFL

No. 4 pick Keegan Murray had 26 points and eight rebounds, leading Sacramento past Golden State 86-68 in the second game on Saturday. The Kings announced shortly before the game that Murray had signed his rookie contract. He didn’t disappoint, making 10 of 14 shots from the floor, 4 of 5 from 3-point range. “The confidence grew throughout the game and my teammates kept giving me the ball,” Murray said.
Thursday’s funeral service in Fort Wayne was bittersweet — a joyful remembrance of who Caleb Swanigan was, and a reminder that he is gone far too soon. He died of natural causes June 20 at the age of 25. “He was a gentle giant — not because of his height, but because his heart was so big,” said Susan Thomas, a friend who was one of the first people to meet Swanigan when he came to Fort Wayne before his eighth-grade year. “He had friends everywhere. People were drawn to him.”
Swanigan’s brother Courtlynd says his little brother was “one of the greatest people I’ve known in my life. He was the best little brother anybody could ever ask for.” His brother Corey said that “most people look up to people with more wisdom or more experience, but my baby brother made his legacy. I tried to be there any way I could. If he needed me, I was there for him anyway I could. No questions asked.” His mother, Tanya Swanigan, said, “Caleb is my hero.”
Swanigan’s love was mentioned time and time again during the service that lasted three hours — love for his family, his friends, his sport and for strangers. His sister Crystal said Caleb’s love “overshadowed everything.” “It overshadowed pain. It overshadowed insecurities,” she said. “If you don’t have love, you have nothing on this earth. And he was rich in love. He loved everyone he met and treated them all the same. We can all learn from him that love covers all.”