Saturday, while at the Milwaukee Bucks’ groundbreakin…

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The Warriors' 73 victories broke the Bulls' 1996 record, but O'Neal said his 2001 Lakers would have beaten them. That team set an NBA record by going 15-1 in the postseason for the second of three straight championships under Jackson, back when O'Neal could be an even bigger physical force before rules changes loosened the game for free-flowing offenses like Golden State's to thrive. "If you're using those rules, we'd win. Now we use these rules these days, we'd still win, because you wouldn't be allowed to touch me, you wouldn't be allowed to touch Kobe," O'Neal said. "So yeah, that's how I always look at it."
Basketball Hall of Famer Dave Bing has a pretty strong opinion: Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry is the best shooter in NBA history. "He is absolutely the best shooter that has played the game," said Bing, who was named one of the Top 50 NBA players of all time. "Nobody's close, except his teammate." Curry's teammate, of course, is Klay Thompson. But Bing gave Curry the nod over Thompson because of everything else he does.
“People think us old guys hate when we talk about it,” Barkley told Bickley and Marotta on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. “It has nothing to do with the Warriors’ greatness, LeBron’s greatness. But I’ve never seen the NBA as bad as it is, and I’ve been saying it the last three or four years. We’ve got too many young players coming out of college that don’t know how to play. It’s frustrating for me because I want to see competitive basketball.
“It’s funny how the game has changed,” Bird continued. “And my thinking about it. I was really worried—back sixteen, seventeen years ago—that the little guy didn’t have a spot in the N.B.A. anymore: it was just going to be the big guards like Magic Johnson. But then players started shooting more threes and spacing the court, and everyone wants small guards now. Watching these kids play now, I’m like everybody else: Wow, man. They can really shoot! They have more freedom to get to the basket. The ball moves a little better. These kids are shooting from farther, with more accuracy. Now some teams shoot up around thirty threes a game. My era, you always think that’s the greatest era. But I’m not so sure anymore.”
“People think us old guys hate when we talk about it,” Barkley told Bickley and Marotta on Arizona Sports 98.7 FM. “It has nothing to do with the Warriors’ greatness, LeBron’s greatness. But I’ve never seen the NBA as bad as it is, and I’ve been saying it the last three or four years. We’ve got too many young players coming out of college that don’t know how to play. It’s frustrating for me because I want to see competitive basketball.
"The past guys that have been in this league are always going to have an opinion of what they would've been like in this era and this new generation," Irving said. "All you can do is respect what they have given to the game, respect any opinion of the past guys that have given something to this game that I've watched for numerous years. It's all in good respect."
NBA players today are, on average, significantly better at virtually every skill relevant to basketball than ever before. And the gap between modern players and players in the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s is enormous, and even since the late 80’s and 90’s there’s been at least some improvement.
Curry has been the most recent victim of this growing trend, with the likes of Oscar Robertson and others marginalizing the historic accomplishments of the Golden State Warriors star and reigning MVP with their self-serving commentary. “Yeah, for me personally in my career I’ve done nothing but big-up the guys who paved the way for us,” James told USA TODAY Sports. “I’m respectful to all the guys who paved the way, the greats, guys who were role players, guys who were part of a championship team or was not. I’ve always been respectful, so it does kind of suck when you’ve got guys who played before us and paved the way for us (and) …they like to talk down on a lot of our players, saying, ‘Well if they played in our era it wouldn’t be the same.’”
“I heard Dennis Rodman say if I played in their era I’d just be an average player – yeah, about me, that I’d be just an average player,” James said. “And they say the same things about Steph, ‘If Steph played in our era, then we’d be more physical with him and we’d go at him.’ And it sucks because we’re just trying to carry the torch for the next group to come behind us. “I just want to be able to leave a mark personally, and be able to leave this game, this beautiful game, when I’m done with it for the next group of guys. I’m never one to talk down on a group of guys. If they can play, they can play.”
Storyline: Old School vs. New School
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July 2, 2022 | 11:57 pm EDT Update

76ers, Mavericks also listed as suitors for Kyrie Irving

Kevin Gray Jr: “Kyrie Irving has several suitors involved Lakers, Sixers & Mavericks, keep an eye out in the next couple of weeks…” per Shams Charania #MFFL

No. 4 pick Keegan Murray had 26 points and eight rebounds, leading Sacramento past Golden State 86-68 in the second game on Saturday. The Kings announced shortly before the game that Murray had signed his rookie contract. He didn’t disappoint, making 10 of 14 shots from the floor, 4 of 5 from 3-point range. “The confidence grew throughout the game and my teammates kept giving me the ball,” Murray said.
Thursday’s funeral service in Fort Wayne was bittersweet — a joyful remembrance of who Caleb Swanigan was, and a reminder that he is gone far too soon. He died of natural causes June 20 at the age of 25. “He was a gentle giant — not because of his height, but because his heart was so big,” said Susan Thomas, a friend who was one of the first people to meet Swanigan when he came to Fort Wayne before his eighth-grade year. “He had friends everywhere. People were drawn to him.”
Swanigan’s brother Courtlynd says his little brother was “one of the greatest people I’ve known in my life. He was the best little brother anybody could ever ask for.” His brother Corey said that “most people look up to people with more wisdom or more experience, but my baby brother made his legacy. I tried to be there any way I could. If he needed me, I was there for him anyway I could. No questions asked.” His mother, Tanya Swanigan, said, “Caleb is my hero.”
Swanigan’s love was mentioned time and time again during the service that lasted three hours — love for his family, his friends, his sport and for strangers. His sister Crystal said Caleb’s love “overshadowed everything.” “It overshadowed pain. It overshadowed insecurities,” she said. “If you don’t have love, you have nothing on this earth. And he was rich in love. He loved everyone he met and treated them all the same. We can all learn from him that love covers all.”