One ex-player who took advantage of the screening was C…

One ex-player who took advantage of the screening was Cherokee Parks, who had surgery to repair an aortic valve in 2013 and is a proponent for comprehensive health care for former NBA players. The issue for many ex-players who did not get lucrative contracts may not only be lack of attention to potential health issues, but the inability to afford quality health care if problems are discovered. “It’s unfortunate that we’ve had fatalities to bring all of this stuff to the surface, but quite frankly it’s bad,” Parks said. “We all prepared to get to the NBA since we were 12, 13 years old, and basically when you get to college and you play in the NBA, you’re babied. You’re shown what doctors to go to, don’t pay for anything, you go in there and when you get the results back, you don’t even get the results, they all go to your team physician.”

More on Sean Rooks Death

Parks said Rooks’s death has had a profound effect on a lot of players from his generation. “I think with Sean Rooks, maybe it was the final straw right there,” Parks said. “Players leaving the league after a certain number of years should have full health coverage for the rest of your life. And the league should be able to put the funds together where they can maintain and say, ‘Hey you’re 40, go get a CT scan. At 45, you should be getting this blood work done.’ We’ve been babied for so long, you are just really learning at 35 how to take care of yourself for the first time on top of how to pay for these things. For me right now, it’s a major part of my life.”
For many former NBA players, it’s not only overeating that may cause heart issues, but chronic physical issues may prevent the ability to work out. Former NBA sharpshooter Tracy Murray, who underwent the screening, said a recent hip replacement prevents him from playing basketball as he once did. He has to find creative ways to exercise. “Things that you could burn off back in the day, you can’t burn off anymore,” Murray said. “When we were younger we were taught how to eat when we got [to the NBA]. That excludes all the stuff that you really like to eat, like soul food or pizza, and when you’re done [playing], No. 1 you don’t want to run anymore for a while and No. 2, I want to eat whatever I want to eat and the end result of that is you start gaining weight. It’s best to stay on top it.”
In a statement to The Undefeated, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver expressed his sadness over Rooks’ death while pointing to the league’s developing health maintenance focus: “Like so many members of the NBA family, I was deeply saddened by the sudden loss of Sean Rooks. Sean was beloved around the league as a friend and a coach, and he was an important mentor to many young players. Our thoughts and deepest sympathies are with his family. His tragic death due to heart disease is yet another reminder of why cardiac health and screening remains an extremely high priority for the league, the Players Association and the Retired Players Association.”
The first of these screenings was held in Orlando, Florida, on June 21 and the next will be in Detroit on Friday. According to the Orlando Sentinel, nurses drew blood to measure HDL, LDL and triglyceride levels, and echocardiograms and carotid artery ultrasounds were also performed. A cardiologist was also on hand for the 15 retired players who attended. Former NBA center Kevin Willis told The Undefeated: “I’m glad the union did that. They’re trying to take it to the next level.”
Golden State forward-center Marreese Speights took somber notice of Rooks’ death and is familiar with the trend of former NBA big men dying from heart complications. The 6-foot-10, 255-pounder believes that today’s NBA players are blessed with state-of-the-art evaluations before every season to ensure their hearts are fit. “Nowadays they do a lot of testing before you get on the court,” Speights told The Undefeated. “They give you a stress test and all kind of other things to make sure everything is right with your heart. They can find out anything they want today in this league. Back in the day when those guys were playing, they probably never had any of that stuff, so they probably never knew.
As rookies came into the league, Rooks took them under his wing, offered them guidance, encouragement and direction to navigate this new world of pro basketball. Keyon Dooling was one of those rookies in 2000. He was one of four first-year players on the Los Angeles Clippers, while Rooks was the second-most experienced. Rooks stepped up as a shoulder to lean on. “He was like the big uncle,” Dooling told CSNPhilly.com. “We had a difference of age, but he really showed us the way.”
Charlotte Hornets General Manager Rich Cho released the following statement regarding the passing of former NBA player and coach Sean Rooks. “The Charlotte Hornets were deeply saddened to learn about the passing of Sean Rooks last night. Sean not only had a solid NBA playing career, but also had been working tirelessly on honing his craft as a coach. Recently, we entered into negotiations with Sean to be the head coach of our D-League team, the Greensboro Swarm. When talking with Sean, you immediately understood why he was so beloved by teammates, coaches and those that worked with him. Our thoughts and prayers are with Sean's family and friends during this time.”
Former NBA center and Philadelphia 76ers assistant coach Sean Rooks' death may have been due to heart disease, a spokesperson for the Philadelphia Public Health Department told USA TODAY Sports on Wednesday. Rooks, 46, collapsed at a Philadelphia restaurant on Tuesday, according to multiple published reports. His death was announced by the 76ers later in the day.
Marc J. Spears: Sixers coach Brett Brown statement on the passing of Sean Rooks. The following is a statement from Philadelphia 76ers Head Coach Brett Brown, who is currently in Istanbul, Turkey, regarding the untimely passing of Sean Rooks: "I learned of this tragic news in the early morning hours last night. Sean Rooks was a wonderful person with a kind soul who deserved to live longer than he did. Sean was with me for two years and helped our young players and coaching staff by sharing his experiences in such an endearing way.
Brett Brown on Sean Rooks: "It was exciting for me to sit with him recently and see the enthusiasm he had while preparing to interview for the Head Coach position with an NBA D-League team. We would role-play, ask each other different questions, and when he left I felt like he had a real chance to make a significant advancement in his own coaching career.
Ish Smith was taking a nap after a training session when he woke up to find his phone illuminating with calls and text messages. He tried to digest the news he was receiving, yet it seemed unreal. Sixers player development coach Sean Rooks had died at only 46 years old (see story). "From the basketball standpoint, everybody knew how great he was,” Smith told CSNPhilly.com Tuesday evening. “But as a person, Coach Rooks was unbelievable. He was special."
Rooks also let it be known to the young Sixers squad that he still had game. More than 12 years since his last NBA game, he often had shooting competitions with other members of the coaching staff and showcased his skills. “When I heard about it, it was shocking because he used to always get out there and play and shoot with us,” Smith said. “He’d always say, ‘This is what a real shooting four is.’ And he could stroke it."
David West: Sad to hear of the passing of Sean Rooks!!! Truly a great dude, always a kind word!!!Peace to his family and all who new him!!
Mark Cuban: RIP Sean Rooks. You made plane rides my first year fun. Can't believe we talked just a few weeks ago. You will be missed Wookie.
Tony Wroten: Man RIP coach Sean Rooks. I Can't believe it. A great coach and an even better person off the court. Prayers go out to him and his family.
Marcus Morris: Prayers up to Sean Rooks and his family. Heard nothing but great things about him. R.i.p
Chris Mannix: The Sixers confirm the passing of former assistant coach Sean Rooks. No cause of death given. Rooks, a 12-year NBA veteran, was 46.
Hours after interviewing for an assistant coaching job with the New York Knicks on Tuesday, former NBA center Sean Rooks collapsed and died in a Philadelphia restaurant. Rooks, considered a warm and engaging gentleman within the basketball community, had been a player-development coach for the past two years with the Philadelphia 76ers.
Rooks, 46, had traveled to New York and back again on the train Tuesday, meeting with Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek, general manager Steve Mills and president Phil Jackson about becoming an assistant coach. Rooks and Knicks officials had departed the meeting enthusiastic that Rooks might join Hornacek’s staff and that an agreement could be reached soon, league sources said.
Marc J. Spears: Sean Rooks was a gentle giant who always greeted me with warmth. He was on the verge of being hired as Hornets' D-League coach, sources said.
Bob Cooney: Hearing word of death of Sixers assistant Sean Rooks. Great guy. Could talk hoops with him all day. Keep family in your prayers, please.
Storyline: Sean Rooks Death
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December 4, 2022 | 6:14 am EST Update

Floyd Mayweather has offered 'a little over $2 billion' to buy NBA team

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Mayweather indicated that he and his business partners continue to pursue the purchase of an NBA team. Mayweather didn’t indicate which franchise was in his sights but indicated that the pursuit has been in the works for an extended period. “I’ve been working on buying a NBA team outright,” said Mayweather. “One of my other business partners, Brent Johnson, he’s here. So we’ve been working on the NBA team for a while now. It’s kinda, it’s rough.”

Bradley Beal on re-signing with Wizards: 'There were no teams in the market'

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Minnesota Timberwolves center Rudy Gobert was ejected in the first half of the Saturday’s 135-128 loss to the visiting Oklahoma City Thunder after he appeared to purposefully trip Kenrich Williams. Gobert contested Williams on a drive to the rim with 9:22 to go in the second quarter, causing Williams to fall to the ground. Gobert tripped over Williams and while down on the court appeared to sweep a leg out in an attempt to trip Williams when the Thunder forward was attempting to get up. A brief scuffle ensued, after which Gobert was assessed a flagrant foul 2 and ejected. Williams received a technical foul. “I trust that they got it right,” Thunder coach Mark Daigneault said of the officials’ ruling.
Jon Krawczynski: Finch: “I think for sure, the frustrations boiled over. It was not the most mature effort by us. We needed a way more mature effort than that. We needed to do the little things better like take care of the ball and make the next rotation on defense. That’s what cost us the game.”