Jeff Zillgitt: Following news that 76ers bought eSports…

Jeff Zillgitt: Following news that 76ers bought eSports franchise: announced today Peter Guber & Ted Leonsis bought controlling interest in eSports team.

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Jeff Zillgitt: Among the investors in eSports' Team Liquid: Ted Leonsis, Peter Guber, Magic Johnson, Tony Robbins, Rick Welts, Kirk Lacob, Zach Leonis.
Jeff Zillgitt: At an NBA owners meeting last year, Adam Silver/league gave presentation about eSports. twitter.com/gnavas103/stat…
The Philadelphia 76ers will become the first North American professional sports team to own an esports team. The team will announce Monday that it has acquired long-time franchise Dignitas and upstart Apex, which offers a guaranteed spot in the highly coveted League of Legends Championship Series, and operate under the Dignitas name.
SLAM: Jordan Clarkson recently said that aside from himself, you, Larry Nance Jr, Roy Hibbert and Anthony Brown were the top Call of Duty players on the team last year. Is anyone else nice at COD? D'Angelo Russell: I honestly don’t know. We got a lot of vets on our team so I’m not sure if they even know what Call of Duty is, but I would say that’s about it. Maybe Julius [Randle]. He’s a fan and is good at it. SLAM: If you could pick one or two other players and form a squad, would you guys come out with the W against one of these top teams participating in the Call of Duty Championships? D'Angelo Russell: Oh yeah, I’d get my boy Devin Booker and Karl-Anthony Towns and we’d be successful.
Jerebko brought the five-man team over from Australia to suburban Detroit to train and prepare for its next event. Jerebko, 29, was an avid video game player in his youth and seized the opportunity for team ownership. “Sports and computer games were my childhood growing up,” Jerebko said. “Basically, I started off playing all types of games. I started playing CS:GO in sixth grade and it kind of kept me away from partying and going out and doing stupid stuff. It was video games and sports. It helped me stay focused. Playing in the NBA, you are always gaming and you get your work done and you’ve got a lot of hours to kill, so video games come natural for a lot of NBA athletes.”
Boston Celtics forward Jonas Jerebko has bought the rights to the Renegades franchise from Christopher "MonteCristo" Mykles. “The opportunity to own Renegades and bring some of my knowledge from professional basketball to eSports is incredible,” said Jerebko in a press release. “I grew up in the video game era, and I was exposed to Counter-Strike at a young age. I have watched the eSports world explode and, for me, it’s really exciting to be a team owner and help push the industry forward.”
Although Jerebko said he's aware that esports has very much turned into the wild, wild west, he hopes he can lend credibility to the sport. That means that Jerebko, who has served as team player representative for the National Basketball Players Association, doesn't have a problem with pro gamers having rights. "The Call of Duty players we were negotiating with were under contract last year and weren't getting paid for three to five months," Jerebko said. "That's not going to happen with me. You get a paycheck on time."
Lin was one of the thousands of fans who packed the KeyArena for five days leading into Sunday's final. He has been playing Dota since he was 16 years old with his brothers Josh and Joseph. He says he still plays three to four times a week, even during the NBA season, especially on the road, when he's in his hotel room. "They were playing and I started playing just because I wanted to hang out with them," Lin said of his brothers. "At first it was an awful game, because I was going 0 for 10 every single game with Bounty Hunter. How do you go 0 for 10 with Bounty Hunter? But eventually when I started to learn the game and get better, I started realizing this is like basketball. It's about having each other's back, being loyal, being at that right place at the right time, outsmarting the other team. And there's this huge mental component in this competition that I've always thrived off of. That's why I love playing it."
"They're doing something that everyone loves doing, but they just do it at another level and they're extremely talented. That's why you have this fanaticism, and that's why you have people lined up at midnight asking for autographs." "It's really not any different than sports," Lin continued, "except with sports there's more of a physical component of you doing it yourself, whereas in video games you're just controlling a hero that does the same thing. It's the unique talent of the players that is the draw."
For The Win: What has it been like learning more about this different sort of (eSports) world? Rick Fox: That we’re not so different. Just mastering excellence is I think what defines you as a pro. Playing and competing and winning under pressure, having a career where you’re idolized by young men and women who want to do exactly what you’re doing, jumping out of bed and being passionate about your career, I like at all those things and I look at the people that surround the players that are on Echo Fox. I see their dedication, their focus, their work ethic, how much time they put in, and it mirrors a lot of what it took for me to get as good as I got. And then I interacted with them just as I interacted with many of my former teammates. There’s so many different forms and expressions when it comes to professional sports and what makes it a professional athletes. I know eSports in general is grabbing more respect and inclusion is something that I subscribe to in general, so having them join the fraternity of professional athletes actually is no longer a debate. It must happen.
FTW: What’s your stance on eSports and has that changed? Recently, ESPN has been getting into it, it’s now seen more of as a legitimate sport whereas before it was viewed as just video games and not a real sport. KB: I think people are really interested in watching people problem solve. It doesn’t matter what industry. People are very fascinated by that — seeing the struggles people go through and how they overcome it. I think this was just a matter of time before it caught fire. To be able to sit and watch a performance on TV and watch how the gamers are figuring out those challenges amongst themselves, you can’t help but be interested.
NBA legend Shaquille O'Neal became one of the latest sports stars to jump into eSports when he became part owner of NRG earlier this year along with Alex Rodriguez. NRG fields a pro League of Legends and Counter-Strike team, and beginning May 24th NRG will compete in the new Counter-Strike: Global Offensive ELEAGUE, which will be televised on TBS. Shaq says he now has a Ph.D. in CS:GO, and in this hilarious video became part of the scenery on a few different maps.
The Nets parent company, Brooklyn Sports & Entertainment announced Wednesday that ESL, the world’s largest esports company, will bring the East Coast’s largest esports tournament to Barclays Center in October. ESports are online video game competitions. Now, as esports grows, big tournaments will be conducted live in large venues like Barclays. Barclays Center will play host to a US$250,000 Counter-Strike: Global Offensive competition, with more games joining the tournament’s lineup to be announced in the coming weeks. Esports has become a top priority for BS&E, Mikhail Prokhorov's "mother ship" for sports and entertainment, particularly CEO Brett Yormark.
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But that hasn’t stopped Beal from trying to recruit. Beal says he has shared his vision with other star players around the league about how they could fit in Washington next to him. He raves about the “freshness” of the team, with a new coach, a new system, and plenty of improving young players. Though selling Washington as most stars look to more glamorous markets has its challenges. “A lot of people seem to think D.C. is a small market, but I try to tell them it’s a big market,” Beal says. “It makes that part of recruiting tougher.”
GM Sean Marks declined comment, but from ownership to the front office to his teammates, there is a confidence Harden has every intention of staying in Brooklyn. “You know, the reality is I haven’t thought much about it because James loves it here. He’s totally locked-in,” coach Steve Nash said when asked by The Post about Harden’s extension before Tuesday’s opener in Milwaukee. “So, while we would’ve loved to have signed him before the deadline, it was James’ prerogative when he re-signs.