Even Jeremy Lin lives in Brooklyn now. New York’s pro…

Even Jeremy Lin lives in Brooklyn now. New York’s professional athletes have long gravitated to luxury Manhattan high-rises, trendy TriBeCa lofts and sprawling mansions on the Hudson. Not since there was baseball at Ebbets Field and the old Dodgers had homes in Bay Ridge have players chosen to actually live in Brooklyn. But that has all changed in recent months. The Nets are playing, practicing and, at long last, living in Brooklyn this season. In fact, 12 of the 15 players with guaranteed contracts are bona fide residents, a stark change from last season when the team was still practicing in East Rutherford, N.J., and only one player lived in the borough. This season, some players reside within a bounce pass of the fetid Gowanus Canal, a Superfund site. Their real estate decisions are the latest proof that this ain’t your father’s Brooklyn — unless your father cultivated roof-to-table microgreens and ran a small-batch bourbon distillery/yarn store. “It’s different,” said Luis Scola, a forward from Argentina whose family has a three-bedroom rental in Carroll Gardens. “You walk places. We’re riding our bikes a lot. It’s a place with real personality.”
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January 26, 2022 | 9:34 pm EST Update

Rockets to be less motivated sellers in the trade deadline

Two weeks before the deadline, the Rockets are sellers, unquestionably so if the only choices are to be buyers or sellers. But since everything has changed from their previous ventures into the deadline deal-making period, the Rockets’ roles and goals this season are not so easily defined. They are sellers who are far less motivated to deal than in previous seasons.
They are unlikely to seek a small step forward, a solid role player type who does not bring star potential to drive the rebuild. But they do not need to make everything about acquiring picks, especially in next June’s draft, in which they already have two selections. They have two second-year players, Jae’Sean Tate and K.J. Martin, in the rotation and chose four then-teenagers in last year’s draft, collecting more young players than they have had minutes to play.
Eric Gordon would seem to be the Rockets’ most valuable trade asset, other than the first-round picks that would take a legitimate star talent to pry loose. At 33, Gordon would seem to be on a different timetable from a core crowded with teenagers. Though talks so far have been at most exploratory, offers could come later. The Rockets would have to determine not just how they feel about the deals that might be available but how they compare offers to what they believe they could get before the draft or in the offseason.
Storyline: Eric Gordon Trade?