"Obviously I love it here in the Bay Area," Curry said.…

“Obviously I love it here in the Bay Area,” Curry said. “It’s all I’ve known in the league. And if the situation is right going forward, this is a place I would love to play.” Golden State will try hard to make it work. They need Curry not only for his on-court acumen but because the Warriors are trying to move to San Francisco and build an opulent new arena by 2019, and they want the widely beloved Curry to continue to be the face of their franchise.

More on Stephen Curry Free Agency

Curry still owns a house in the Charlotte area and his parents live in the city. Father Dell is a former Hornets star who works for the team as a broadcaster, but he largely stays out of his children's decision-making processes. I asked Steph point-blank if he would consider going to Charlotte in the summer of 2017. "I don't know," he said.
He then went on to imply that at an unspecified point earlier in his career a "Steph in Charlotte" scenario might have been more possible, saying "obviously I had a strong tie to Charlotte and would have loved to play there. I'm very comfortable in that city. It's hard to say exactly what the situation will be this summer." My read on this? Barring an enormous turn of events, Curry and Golden State are joined at the hip and will be for the next few seasons. But Curry isn't saying "no" in part because it wouldn't be smart business to close off every avenue when he might soon be signing what could be the richest deal in NBA history.
I personally think if Curry ever plays in Charlotte it would happen sometime in his mid-30s, after his next blockbuster deal expires. As for now, though, he said he's not thinking about free agency. "It's on my radar," he said, "but it's not really on my mind as much day-to-day. I'm just trying to enjoy what this season is going to bring."
Curry wasn’t going to completely paint himself into a corner, but he said as much speaking to the Wall Street Journal. Although he says “curveballs happen all the time,” it should relieve millions of people in the Bay Area that Curry feels that he is home. “It’s hard to see myself anywhere else,” he says.
Under Armour lost nearly $600 million of its value as a company Friday, as its stock plummeted by more than 4 percent after the CEO of a major footwear retailer said the latest version of its Steph Curry shoe wasn't doing as well as expected. Foot Locker CEO Dick Johnson said the Curry 3 "started off a bit slower than the previous models," causing a sell-off in the stock market.
The shoe faces two challenges: The first is its price. Under Armour raised the price of the Curry 3 to $140 a pair. That's an increase of $20 from the Curry 1 and $10 from the Curry 2. Second, when he plays, Curry wears a shoe with a higher profile in order to protect his ankle. Nearly 80 percent of the people who wear basketball shoes do so for fashion, and lower-profile shoes are more popular.
One wrinkle in the current proposed deal, according to sources familiar with it: Cap holds attached to free agents coming off rookie contracts could jump to 250 and 300 percent of their prior salaries, up from 200 and 250 percent, to prevent teams from arranging wink-wink deals as San Antonio and Detroit did with Kawhi Leonard and Andre Drummond, respectively: "Hang in free agency as a cheapo cap hold, and we'll sign everyone else first." That extra few million matters for teams scrounging max cap space. As of now, cap holds attached to players with more experience would stay the same, per league sources. That could change, of course. But the status quo would be huge for Golden State, which is counting on Stephen Curry's under-market cap hold -- $18 million, way below his $30-million-plus max salary -- to fit Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, and Shaun Livingston.
The longstanding estimate for a Curry max used to be a five-year deal in the $175 million range. Yet the recent dip in the league’s projections for the 2017-18 salary cap -- teams were notified in July of a forecasted drop from $108 million to $102 million –- means that $165 million over five years is the proper estimate as we speak. We arrived at that figure in consultation with ESPN cap maven Larry Coon, who projects Steph’s 2017-18 max to come in at a shade under $28.8 million as a player with seven to nine seasons of service time.
Curry, who is in the final year of a four-year, $44 million deal, will once again be the fifth-highest paid player on the team. That's something he said he's at peace with. "I told myself, when I made the decision to sign for what I did back in the day, that I'm blessed to take care of my family for what it was," Curry said. "And there would probably be a situation, if I played the way I was supposed to coming off that contract, that I could be underpaid or whatever. But at the end of the day, it would all come around and we won the championship and good things happened."
Ric Bucher: I think the Spurs are looking at the fact that Kevin Durant came into Golden State and that Kevin Durant may take up some of the superstar space that was previously occupied by Steph Curry... and when Steph Curry becomes a free agent, I think they are going to go hard at Steph Curry.
2. Curry’s new contract would not run nearly as long as if he waits one year for free agency. A renegotiated extension can only be for a maximum of four seasons, and the renegotiated season counts, so a Curry contract this summer would go through the 2019-20 season while a five-year contract as a free agent next summer could give him security until 2021-22. Waiting also likely gives Curry a higher salary per season since the cap will rise again next year — especially if, as expected, the value of maximum contracts is increased in the 2017 labor renegotiations.
Curry again stated his desire to stay with the Warriors in a video posted on his Facebook page (scroll ahead to the 2:33 mark). Asked if he ever thought he’d leave Golden State, Curry said, “Hopefully not. Hopefully everything works out and I can finish my career here. I’ve probably got like 10 good years left.”
Stephen Curry plans to stay with the Warriors long term and isn’t interested in free agency after the 2016-17 season, the league MVP told Sporting News. “As I am thinking right now, free agency isn’t really appealing to me because I love where I’m at, love the organization I’m playing for, and the Bay Area is home for me and my family,” Curry said. Curry becomes an unrestricted free agent in the summer of 2017 unless he works out an extension with Golden State before then. He remains an absolute bargain for the champion Warriors after signing a four-year, $44 million deal in October 2012 that will pay him $11.3 million this upcoming 2015-16 season and $12.1 million in 2016-17.
Storyline: Stephen Curry Free Agency
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November 30, 2020 | 12:21 pm EST Update
The New Orleans Pelicans announced today that the team has re-signed forward Brandon Ingram. Per team policy, terms of the deal were not disclosed. “Brandon Ingram has earned this contract extension by virtue of everything he has accomplished that is visible, but we are grateful to be able to deliver it to him because of everything he has done that has remained largely hidden to those outside this organization,” said Pelicans Executive Vice President of Basketball Operations David Griffin. “His tireless work-ethic and dedication to his craft are matched only by his desires to help deliver long-term success for his team, our fan base and the communities he lives in.”
Storyline: Brandon Ingram Extension
What are your expectations for this shortened 2020-21 season? Stephen Curry: Knowing what the top of the West looks like … with obviously L.A. winning the championship and reloading … you look at the Clippers, you look at Denver, Houston, Portland, Utah, Dallas, Phoenix, Sacramento, there’s so many talented teams that are looking to take that next step. We’ve been there before, so we know what it takes, and we’re going to rely on that for sure. But we’ve got that nice, perfect balance of experience and youth. And when it comes to a playoff matchup, when we’re in there and we’re locked in, we know we’re tough to beat. Come playoff time, whenever that is, we know we’ll be there, we know we’ll be a force to be reckoned with on that front.
GQ: Financially, how dire would the consequences have been if the season had to be canceled? Adam Silver: I mean, I wouldn’t use the word dire, only because I tend to look at our business over a longer-term horizon. Even though we had an opportunity, of course, to restart the season, the financial implications are still pretty traumatic. The players will still take a significant pay cut, and most of our teams will also lose significant amounts of money—not just from their NBA team but [also from their] arenas and all of those nights that have remained dark. Again, I’m trying to take a longer-term perspective and with a recognition that this too shall pass, whether it takes another six months for a vaccine to be widely distributed or it takes another year to get back up and running. Meanwhile, we’re watching what’s happening around the world. For example, we have Game 4 of the Finals taking place on Tuesday night in Orlando. So on Wednesday morning in Shanghai, in fact, there is a viewing party at an arena where they’re going to have 5,000 fans, and they’re comfortable doing that. They have protocols for doing that.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
Adam Silver: I only say that because long before there was even a movement called Black Lives Matter, there was the NBA. There was Bill Russell, there was Oscar Robertson and Wayne Embry and Lenny Wilkens and all these great Black leaders within the league. Part of what I’m focusing on is finding our own voice for next season and putting us in a leadership position on these issues, and—maybe I’m naive to say this—putting us in a role to unify people as well. Now, some people might suggest that the words Black Lives Matter are causing massive amounts of people to tune out the NBA. There’s absolutely no data to support that. And in fact, as I said, there’s no doubt there are some people—and whether or not they were truly our fans to begin with is unclear—who have become further engaged with the league because they believe in our players and they believe in the positions they’ve taken, even if they don’t agree with everything they say. They respect their right to speak out on issues that are important to them.
How would you respond to those who struggle to reconcile these established values that the NBA represents and the business relationship that the league has with China? Adam Silver: I think they’re very different. I don’t think it should be a surprise to people that in a league that is 80 percent Black, that issues of social justice are the issues that they choose to speak out on. To me, that’s the essence of what free speech is. Free speech is your decision as to what to speak out on and where to focus your attention. And through the relationships that we have in China—directly with the hundreds of millions of people in China that follow NBA basketball—we are an exporter of American values. And again, I’m not naive. I don’t mean to suggest that therefore their system of government will change because people watch NBA basketball. But I think through those relationships come commonality of interest and ultimately empathy and a better understanding of each other. I don’t know how else to say it, but I think it’s a net positive, because the alternative is disengagement.
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