Serena Winters: Magic on Jeanie: “She’s my boss, bu…

More on Lakers Front Office

Arash Markazi: Jeanie Buss: "The status quo wasn't acceptable... It wasn't Lakers basketball. It wasn't what this organization stands for. "
Mark Medina: Reached Mitch Kupchak, who respectfully declined comment on no longer being Lakers' GM. He might address it once dust settles, but not now
Sam Amick: Two more names to watch in Lakers situation, in addition to Rob Pelinka & Arn Tellem: Portland's Neil Olshey & former Cavs GM Chris Grant
Marc Stein: In addition to Rob Pelinka -- agent for James Harden and Kobe Bryant -- longtime agent Arn Tellem is also said to be on the Lakers' radar.
Los Angeles Lakers Governor Jeanie Buss announced today that the team has named Earvin "Magic" Johnson as President of Basketball Operations. In addition, General Manager Mitch Kupchak has been relieved of his duties, effective immediately. Furthermore, Jim Buss will no longer hold his role as Lakers Executive Vice President of Basketball Operations.
"Today I took a series of actions I believe will return the Lakers to the heights Dr. Jerry Buss demanded and our fans rightly expect," Jeanie Buss said. "Effective immediately, Earvin Johnson will be in charge of all basketball operations and will report directly to me. Our search for a new General Manager to work with Earvin and Coach Luke Walton is well underway and we hope to announce a new General Manager in short order. Together, Earvin, Luke and our new General Manager will establish the foundation for the next generation of Los Angeles Lakers greatness." "It's a dream come true to return to the Lakers as President of Basketball Operations working closely with Jeanie Buss and the Buss family," said Earvin "Magic" Johnson. "Since 1979, I've been a part of the Laker Nation and I'm passionate about this organization. I will do everything I can to build a winning culture on and off the court. We have a great coach in Luke Walton and good young players. We will work tirelessly to return our Los Angeles Lakers to NBA champions."
Mark Medina: In statement, Jeanie Buss said Jim Buss is still has ownership role w/ Lakers.
In addition to the changes made within the basketball department, the Lakers also announced they have parted ways with John Black who had been the Lakers Vice President of Public Relations. Chief Operating Officer Tim Harris will immediately begin a search for a replacement. Jeanie Buss added, "We thank John for his many years of service."
League sources were skeptical that Mitch Kupchak and Jim Buss could truly trigger deals on their own and that Johnson would play a role in whatever the team does at the deadline, but sources said they expected Lakers would hold firm unless it were a “no-brainer” deal aimed at the future.
Jeanie Buss took all these things into consideration when she made the decision to bring Magic Johnson back into the fold, and Magic has put some thought into the process he would take to make the Lakers great again. Here’s what he had to say to ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith Wednesday morning. First of all, we have to develop our own players. That’s number one. Number two: We’re going to have to draft well. And number three: You just made the point, you know, we’re all — not just the Lakers — but every team is looking for that franchise-changing player.
Magic Johnson, who was hired earlier this month as an adviser to Los Angeles Lakers president and co-owner Jeanie Buss as she evaluates the direction of the franchise, said Tuesday on ESPN's First Take that he would try to get Kobe Bryant to join him in the front office if his role evolves further.
"First call I make if I'm in charge? Kobe Bryant," Johnson said. "Because Kobe understands winning. He understands, also, these players. I would call, 'What role you want? ... If you've got a day, just give me that day.' "I'll take that. Whatever time he has, I want him to come and be a part of it."
With Magic Johnson holding an advisory role for the Lakers in the past week, however, he predicted that more growing pains await. “It’s going to take three to five years to get them back rolling again,” Johnson said in an interview on CBS This Morning that aired on Monday morning. “If we’re patient and we develop our own players, in today’s NBA it’s different than when I played. you have to develop your own players because free agent movement is not like it used to be. You have to make sure you hit a home run with the players you do draft and keep the players you have on your roster.”
Magic Johnson will meet with Los Angeles Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak and co-owner and executive vice president of basketball operations Jim Buss on Monday to discuss the construction of the current team and the team's strategy heading into the Feb. 23 trade deadline. "Everybody has to be on the same page right now," Johnson told ESPN. "What we should be concerned about is not just right now, but how it will affect the future of the Lakers. That's why we all have to be on the same page."
"Last week someone asked me if I wanted to call the shots. I'd told them my role was as an adviser. Then he said, 'Do you want to call the shots?' And I said, 'I would love to call the shots.' But I know that I'm an adviser. Jim is the one calling the shots. I'm just an adviser. But I want to make sure that I have some type of input, and then he can decide how he wants to use that input," Johnson said. "When I say calling the shots, it's more, 'Somebody has to be the final decision-maker.' I would love that to be me. Everybody has their input, and then somebody has to make the final call. Once we gather all the facts, I'd love to be the person making the final call."
Mark Medina: Now, what's interesting with Magic Johnson, it didn't sound like Jim Buss really knew he was coming. You don't really have to read between the lines when Magic was saying 'hey, I got lunch with Jeanie Buss, I got lunch with some of the other siblings, with Joey Buss, who oversees the D-Fenders, with Jesse Buss, who is part of the front office. Oh, and I had a great phone call with Jim Buss'. What does that tell you?. No face-to-face or interaction with Jim, but with everyone else of course.
Tim Kawakami: I think Jerry (West) is always interested in things in L.A., obviously because he's such a great part of the franchise. I don't think that Magic coming in heavy increases, and I would imagine it decreases, the likelihood of the Lakers being ready to make Jerry an offer for him to come back.
Tim Kawakami: At this point I think that Jerry is going to be back beyond this season. Maybe it's going to be a year-by-year thing from here on. Maybe it will be a slighty different role. He's 78. He had to go to the hospital recently. But I don't think the Lakers for Jerry right now is the odds-on at all, just because the Magic Johnson thing it's a different set-up.
Magic Johnson said he wants to "call the shots'' for the Los Angeles Lakers, a week after it was announced he has rejoined the team as an adviser to owner Jeanie Buss. "Working to call the shots, because it only works that way,'' Johnson told USA TODAY Sports when asked what he hopes his role with the franchise will be. "Right now I'm advising. I get that. But at the end of the day, then we all got to come together and somebody's got to say, ëI'm making the final call,' all right? And who's that going to be? "So, we'll see what happens.''
Magic told Jim he was there to help, that he stood by his criticisms from the past but hoped they could move forward without that baggage. The answer and Johnson's tone disarmed Buss. It was as close to a détente as the two men, both 57 years old, had reached in years. Buss agreed and asked to schedule a meeting after the All-Star break where he and general manager Mitch Kupchak could explain their decision-making over the past few seasons. "I'm taking Magic at face value, that he's here to help," Jim Buss told ESPN. "He's one of the greatest basketball players of all time. Who wouldn't value his opinion? I'm excited to work with Magic for years to come."
When Magic is expected to play a part in the Lakers' decision-making process. But he's not the general manager. He's at the senior level, hired to advise, not to get down in the weeds plotting out maneuvers. The expectation, according to sources close to the situation, is that he will stay at that level beyond this season. In the short term, he'll be a voice alongside Kupchak and Buss. But in the coming months, he's expected to help Jeanie Buss decide whether to revamp the basketball operations leadership team.
Although said to be personally fond of Kupchak, who joined the Lakers' front office in 1986, about halfway through Magic's playing career, he's also determined to make an honest evaluation of the general manager's performance and abilities in today's NBA. According to sources close to the situation, Magic has already heard from agents and executives from other teams that Kupchak's deliberate style can be frustrating to deal with and has probably cost the Lakers in free agency in recent years, missing out on a list of names that includes Isaiah Thomas, Kent Bazemore, Kyle Lowry, Ed Davis, Trevor Ariza, Pau Gasol and Eric Gordon.
That speaks to Kupchak's integrity, as contact with an agent or player is considered tampering before the opening of free agency, but it also speaks, according to sources, to a lack of savvy. There are ways of gathering information on free agents without trampling the rules, so that a team doesn't begin the process far behind everyone else.
Buss agreed and asked to schedule a meeting after the All-Star break where he and general manager Mitch Kupchak could explain their decision-making over the past few seasons. "I'm taking Magic at face value, that he's here to help," Jim Buss told ESPN. "He's one of the greatest basketball players of all time. Who wouldn't value his opinion? I'm excited to work with Magic for years to come."
It starts here as the Feb. 23 trade deadline approaches, when Magic is expected to play a part in the Lakers' decision-making process. But he's not the general manager. He's at the senior level, hired to advise, not to get down in the weeds plotting out maneuvers. The expectation, according to sources close to the situation, is that he will stay at that level beyond this season. In the short term, he'll be a voice alongside Kupchak and Buss. But in the coming months, he's expected to help Jeanie Buss decide whether to revamp the basketball operations leadership team.
According to sources close to the situation, Magic has already heard from agents and executives from other teams that Kupchak's deliberate style can be frustrating to deal with and has probably cost the Lakers in free agency in recent years, missing out on a list of names that includes Isaiah Thomas, Kent Bazemore, Kyle Lowry, Ed Davis, Trevor Ariza, Pau Gasol and Eric Gordon.
That speaks to Kupchak's integrity, as contact with an agent or player is considered tampering before the opening of free agency, but it also speaks, according to sources, to a lack of savvy. There are ways of gathering information on free agents without trampling the rules, so that a team doesn't begin the process far behind everyone else.
As the lead on business affairs, Jeanie Buss does largely stay away from the on-court product. She has said publicly that she often learns of the team's basketball decisions via news reports or texts from her brother. Sources said Kupchak rarely, if ever, communicates with Jeanie Buss, believing he reports only to her brother. That funnel effect has essentially given Kupchak incredible power over decision-making, with only one boss to hold him accountable for successes and failures.
Anyone around the NBA interested in filling that basketball operations post should start polishing the resume, even though Johnson has been close with Kupchak for a long time. Johnson is said to have an open mind about dismissing Kupchak to usher in a new era, according to sources.
Mike Bresnahan: Magic said he also planned to meet with Jim Buss soon. Extended part of Magic interview with @SpectrumSN to air at 6:30 on post-game show.
The Los Angeles Lakers today announced that Earvin "Magic" Johnson will return to the Lakers to assist Jeanie Buss in all areas of basketball and business as an advisor. "We are thrilled and honored to add Magic's expertise and abilities, and I look forward to working alongside him." said Lakers Governor Jeanie Buss.
"Magic Johnson is one of the NBA's greatest players and it is terrific to see him returning to the Lakers," said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. "He is a truly special person and a natural leader with a relentless passion for basketball and profound knowledge of the game." "Everyone knows my love for the Lakers," said Johnson. "Over the years, I have considered other management opportunities, however my devotion to the game and Los Angeles make the Lakers my first and only choice. I will do everything in my power to help return the Lakers to their rightful place among the elite teams of the NBA."
ESPN.com reported a dinner between Jeanie Buss, her longtime close friend Linda Rambis (now a team executive and the wife of former Lakers’ coach and player Kurt Rambis), and Lakers Hall of Famer Magic Johnson at the team’s game at Staples Center last Tuesday with the Denver Nuggets. Maybe it was just dinner. But everything is magnified now. “I think she is still gathering information,” one friend of Jeanie Buss texted Sunday night.
Los Angeles can still easily pursue a max free agent next summer, even with the new contracts on the books, but Mozgov hasn’t been an interior force on offense, and Deng doesn’t look like the Deng of old on defense. In the NBA’s new TV-contract soaked world, the deals aren’t indefensible; But they haven’t been very impactful, either, and that’s something Jeanie Buss is considering as she contemplates her brother’s future. “She’s hearing from enough people that those two signings were not strong enough signings,” said one person who’s spoken with her recently.
Jeanie Buss is sharp and patient, and GM Mitch Kupchak remains well-regarded around the league. Walton, beloved in L.A., put a strong, teaching staff together, and will get every chance to succeed. But how long will it take for the Lakers to be the Lakers again?
On the eleventh year of his exemplary 81-point performance in a single game against the Toronto Raptors, the five-time NBA champion shared his willingness to offer guidance if asked by the Lakers management—particularly the Buss family—whom he was worked closely with during the course of his career. “I’m always around behind the scenes for Jeanie, Jimmy, and the entire Buss family if they need assistance or if it be to reach out or call for advice and things of that nature,” Bryant told sportscaster Stephen A. Smith on ESPN radio, as relayed by the LakersNation website.
Los Angeles Lakers co-owner Jeanie Buss met with Hall of Famer and former Lakers point guard Magic Johnson on Tuesday night, sources with knowledge of the meeting told ESPN. The exact nature of the meeting was not immediately clear, but sources said Buss has been soliciting opinions on the direction the franchise should take moving forward, after three straight losing seasons and possibly a fourth, with the Lakers already having lost 31 games this season.
Buss is the business whiz behind the branding and sponsorships of the Lakers, the keeper of the glamour franchise she and her five siblings inherited when their father, Jerry Buss, died in February 2013. Her fingerprints are on the reported $3 billion television deal with Spectrum SportsNet and the 120,000-square foot practice facility the team will move into next season. She is admired by executives throughout sports and entertainment. “Everything you look for in a CEO, she has,” Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said.
Does the promise shown by Coach Luke Walton and the Lakers’ young core absolve Jim Buss and Mitch Kupchak for three years of losing, the sort of streak Jeanie Buss says her father “just wouldn’t have tolerated”? For those three years, Jeanie Buss has honored her brother’s timeline. “That’s what he said, so I have to give him his time,” she said. “I have to.” It’s a pledge that might prove to be Jim Buss’ undoing. Reached by the Southern California News Group last week, he said he “wasn’t referring to a certain playoff position” and that the deadline “really wasn’t as clear as people say it is.” “This was quotes from three or four years ago,” he said. “Those were what the path was supposed to be.”
Jim Buss said injuries and the Kobe Bryant farewell tour derailed what her were otherwise reasonable expectations. He now believes in a different measuring stick. “If I feel that the strides have been made,” Jim Buss said, “and the team is going in a very positive – not just a positive direction – a very positive direction, I don’t see a switch happening.” The two most prominent Buss siblings agree that the season needs to play out before any decisions can be reached. “We’re like every other team that we will play a season and we will assess that season when it’s over,” Jeanie Buss said. “No reason to speculate on any possible changes. It’s a waste of time to speculate.”
Buss is the figurehead of a family enterprise. She leans heavily on those she trusts, but ultimately, she is the boss. One way or another, her fingerprints will soon be all over the team that takes the court at Staples Center. “I think she understands that she has to make decisions that are important for the future of the franchise, for the growth of the franchise,” said Jerry West, who ran the Lakers front office alongside Kupchak until the summer of 2000 and is currently an executive board member with the Golden State Warriors. “She knows she has to do that. And I don’t think she’d be afraid to do that.”
While some owners hide out in suites, or are escorted to their seats by a ring of beefy security dudes, Buss is among the people, honoring requests for selfies, just another fan who loves the home team. “She’s not wearing a big crown that says, ‘I’m the owner of the Lakers,’” said Tim Harris, the Lakers chief operating officer. “She’s sitting there saying, ‘You want to come up and talk to me? I’m sitting here, season ticket holder in Section 117.’”
Buss projects an image of comfort, speaking a language that is easily understood. She is someone you feel you would trust with something you love. “She is very, very kind and very, very nice,” said Shell, who was an executive at Fox when the broadcasting giant held the Lakers television rights, “but she can be tough in business. In the business world, if you try to take advantage of that kindness, you’ll see a tough side to Jeanie that she also has.”
Walton has visited Buss’ office at least a dozen times, she said, a dramatic shift from the distance kept by Byron Scott and Mike D’Antoni. The strain was palpable after the Lakers made the surprising, 11th-hour hire of D’Antoni in 2012 when Jackson was anticipating an offer. “I have the ultimate faith in Luke Walton,” she said. “I think he brings the joy of the game, and when you see players play with that joy and that competitiveness, that’s what you fall in love with. He’s just brought all of that.”
Of course, Jackson is in New York but it remains to be seen for how long, where he goes and if its colors are purple and gold. Jackson and his fiance, Lakers co-owner Jeanie Buss, both deny it’s happening. That’s absolutely true ... as far as it goes ... until Phil’s opt-out on July 1, 2017, with insiders close to both saying he could still wind up with the Lakers.
Storyline: Lakers Front Office
More HoopsHype Rumors
July 3, 2022 | 9:45 am EDT Update
Trevelin Queen’s basketball journey is an example of relentlessness and perseverance. It’s a journey that includes attending two high schools — being ineligible to play at one — having zero scholarship offers, attending three junior colleges, living in a car, and going undrafted. Yet, Queen has always found ways to weather through obstacles even when it would have been easy to give up. “It’s all part of the process,” said the 25-year-old, who, on Friday, signed a two-year contract with the 76ers that is partially guaranteed for $300,000 next season.
However, he’s one of the headliners on the team that will participate in this week’s Salt Lake City Summer League before traveling to Las Vegas for the NBA2K23 Summer league. And he’ll try to earn a rotation spot on the Sixers’ 15-man roster this upcoming season. For motivation, he can look at what he’s overcome. “I never got discouraged,” he said of his journey. “I knew it was bigger than me. I knew I had to keep going. If I quit, I’m not just letting myself down, I’m letting my family down and everybody who invested in me. So for me, it’s always been bigger than me.”
Brown is excited about the new opportunity in Sacramento, but he will always treasure his time with Kerr, Warriors general manager Bob Myers and the players he coached, including Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. “The first thing is, my time here, obviously, was fantastic, starting with ownership to Bob to Steve and all the players, I couldn’t ask for anything better,” Brown said. “But the fans, too, the fans, they were great. Whether it was here in the arena or me walking around town or riding my little scooter around town, everybody’s always been fantastic. So, it’s a little surreal walking in here and walking into this locker room instead of the other locker room, but at the end of the day, I’m excited and I’m looking forward to all the energy up in Sacramento.”
In a recent appearance on the ‘Getcha Popcorn Ready’ podcast hosted by Terrell Owens and Matthew Hatchette, the ex-Lakers coach went off after being asked if he felt that the modern analytics movement “ruined the game”: Via fubo Sports: “Absolutely. I really started to see a change when I got to the Lakers as a coach because they used that so much as a weapon, ‘well, the analytics tells us..’ I understand the analytics. You’ve got to shoot more threes. But you can’t more threes if you have guys that can’t shoot. I said, ‘So what does that analytics telling you?’”
Storyline: Old School vs. New School