Ian Begley: Carmelo Anthony on Phil Jackson firing: Say…

More on Jackson-Anthony Dynamic

Either way, with Jackson off to his Montana ranch and general manager Steve Mills in charge for now, the future for Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis as teammates again next season looks a bit brighter. Actually, some Knicks officials believe Anthony’s influence on Porzingis has been detrimental and a key reason why Jackson became adamant about removing him from the roster any way he could. “Phil thought Carmelo was trying to sabotage him,’’ an NBA source said.
Jackson was supposed to recruit free agents, and instead he chased them away. One longtime league official said the other day that while he agreed with Jackson's desire to trade Anthony to start a true makeover, he couldn't understand why the Knicks president went out of his way to trash the forward at every turn. "Doesn't he understand that Carmelo still has a really big voice amongst the players in this league?" the official asked. "No, Carmelo isn't the same player he once was, but LeBron and Chris Paul and a lot of very important stars really like and respect him. So what do you think those guys are going to say when Phil tries to recruit them to New York?"
It had become clear, sources said, that Jackson had no plans to remain beyond the two years left on the five-year contract he initially signed in 2014. So with no clear path forward from the toxic situation with Anthony, a constant public relations war over Jackson's preferred triangle offense, and new concerns about the organization's relationship with Latvian phenom and 2015 No. 4 overall pick Kristaps Porzingis, sources said it was clear things had reached a breaking point by the eve of free agency.
Jackson had no plans to work beyond the two years remaining on his contract, and with no clear end to the stalemate with Anthony in sight, discussions with Dolan accelerated late Tuesday night.
Ramona Shelburne: Phil had obviously made it known he thought it was time for the organization to move on from Carmelo, but with no way of doing that, and no plans to lead the organization beyond the remaining two years on his contract, Jackson and Dolan had to decide how to proceed
Stefan Bondy: Carmelo Anthony has told the Knicks he'd like to stay, according to Phil Jackson, who seems keen on having that conversation again post FA.
"Phil Jackson and Carmelo Anthony should have been walking arm in arm to go greet Chris Paul for free agency," said Adrian Wojnarowski. "There's an opportunity to get Chris Paul on this market. He may stay in L.A. and part of it might be because there's nowhere else that makes perfect sense that is worth giving up the money for, but he may go. New York should have been in the Chris Paul conversation.”
Commissioner Adam Silver never considered punishing Phil Jackson for publicly placing Carmelo Anthony on the trading block, despite pleas from union boss Michele Roberts to exercise his disciplining powers on the Knicks president. Why? Jackson had every right to say Anthony was better off playing elsewhere.
"The thing with the league is it's not reciprocal. Players can't trade themselves and teams can trade players," Silver said Thursday in his annual pre-Finals press conference. "There's never been a history in this league of fining a team or disciplining a team executive for talking about trading a player. And that's all I can say."
Steve Popper: Will Perdue joined the NBA on TuneIn's Two Man Weave radio show with Michael Rapaport & Kenyon Martin and gave his take on Phil and Melo: "I wish I could make heads or tails of it...One thing I can tell you is that he was very good at using the media to help motivate players. I kind of recognize what he’s doing in terms of Carmelo, trying to aggravate him and kind of goad him into playing better, but it just seems like Carmelo wants nothing to do with it."
Some opposing executives scratch their heads at how Knicks president Phil Jackson appears to be handling Anthony’s situation. “Phil made a statement basically that Carmelo’s a losing type of player. Well, if he’s a loser for the Knicks, he’s going to be a winner someplace else? That obviously didn’t help,” one Eastern Conference executive said.
“Most owners would just roast you if you said something like that,” the Eastern exec said, theorizing the return for Anthony could be “a protected first-round pick. It sure sounds like the Knicks want to get rid of him so teams won’t give up any of their core to add him. That would be defeating the purpose.”
New York Knicks president Phil Jackson remains hopeful that he will be able to find a trade partner for Carmelo Anthony this summer, but admitted Friday that there was still a chance that Anthony might remain a Knick going into next season.
"He has a no-trade contract," Jackson said, during a break in the action at the NBA Draft combine. "I think I expressed what I felt. I can't express it any better. I thought it was well-said, even though a lot of you didn't feel quite that way. But we'd like him to have success, the opportunity is narrowing. We'd just like him to have success somewhere. We're not going to be there. Hopefully we'll be maybe a playoff team next year. It would be tough to consider us a possible champion."
In light of recent news of marriage troubles between Anthony and his wife, Lala, Jackson wanted his team's star to know that the organization was thinking about him. "Some personal things that came out in the paper, [that news] is difficult," Jackson said. "I just want him to know we're supportive of him. It's a tough time."
The statement, it turns out, only scratched the surface. When Michele Roberts complained in a mid-April release about Phil Jackson’s “inappropriate comments” on Carmelo Anthony, she had much more to say about the Knicks president’s use of his bully pulpit against the franchise’s veteran star. Much more to allege. “I think Phil was deliberately trying to shame ‘Melo out of the city,” she told The Vertical.
“Our players understand that they can privately complain about how a team is managed but they cannot do it publicly without being subject to sanction,” she said. “But it has to work both ways. If Phil tells ‘Melo in private that being in New York is not a good fit for him, that’s his right. But these comments were made in public, and it’s very disturbing because Phil gave him the no-trade clause and he has to respect it. He’s got to allow a player to make a decision for any reason – to win a ring, for money, home life, whatever.”
Anthony is a vice president on the players’ association executive committee, but Roberts said she had not spoken to him about Jackson’s remarks, or anything else. “I feel for ‘Melo, this is a tough time for him and I can only imagine how he’s feeling,” she said. “I know he has been talking to some other people so I’ll let him sort it all out.”
But Bryant says he and Jackson are very close now and credits his longtime coach for helping him see basketball at a higher level. “You can’t enjoy the springtime without having an awful winter,” Bryant said. “You’ve got to go through those things. It’s just a matter of do you want to stay together and work those things out, and be determined to build a championship team? Or do you want to go separate ways.”
Bryant revealed he has lost touch with his buddy, Anthony, whom Jackson publicly stated he wants to trade. “From my experience, from what I had with Phil — again it’s a different situation, he was coaching the team — but you can get through rocky times,’’ Bryant said. “They certainly were there in Chicago and when he was in L.A. But the championships can overshadow that.’’
Michael Scotto: LeBron James is the latest NBA superstar to LIKE the Carmelo Anthony Instagram post directed towards Knicks President Phil Jackson.

http://twitter.com/MikeAScotto/status/853005181809811456

https://www.instagram.com/p/BS4OGuFDBpM
No matter what is said publicly, some in the organization believe the only thing that would keep Anthony on the Knicks in 2017-18 is if owner James Dolan fires team president Phil Jackson, which is now highly unlikely, since the Knicks and Jackson quietly picked up their option on the remaining two years of his contract this spring, sources familiar with the situation told ESPN.
There may have been speculation that the standoff between Jackson and Melo would end with Jackson walking away or the Knicks declining their option on his deal, but sources told ESPN the options were picked up "awhile ago." Knicks owner James Dolan publicly reinforced his commitment to Jackson in a February 10 radio interview on The Michael Kay Show on ESPN New York 98.7 FM when he said, " he planned to honor his five-year contract with Jackson "all the way to the end."
The back-and-forth between Anthony, Hornacek and Rambis in March was but one example of the instability that plagued the 2016-17 Knicks. It typified a divide caused by some players' lack of faith in the defensive game plan under associate head coach Rambis and Hornacek's use of the triangle offense, according to sources.
Anthony acknowledged that it was "hard to trust" Jackson after the team president's veiled criticisms earlier in the season. "If somebody was talking bad about you indirectly at your job, what would you do? You would feel a certain way," he said. "You would want that person to come straightforward with you. And I feel the same way. I'm always open; I'm a very honest person. I know the business and I know the game and I know how it works. So if it's something that you want to get across, a message that you want to get across, I've always been open."
Anthony will have missed seven of the last 11 games with what the Knicks (30-51) called knee and back issues. He’s also granted fewer interviews with the media. Later this week, Anthony will have his exit meeting with Jackson, Hornacek and general manager Steve Mills. Anthony said “the chips will be on the table.”
Dennis Rodman: “And people like Anthony and all you guys, stuff like that, that’s called pressure, man.’ That’s pressure. Especially in New York. They want to win in New York; they will never win in New York. They’ll never win in New York. I’m just saying. Even though he’s a great athlete, great player, he’ll never win in New York. And it’s a great city, though.”
Anthony has taken the high road throughout the season, but the exit interview likely will not be so polite. "Pretty sure the chips will be on the table,” Anthony said. “The chips will be on the table in that meeting. Honestly, I don't know what to expect but I got a good feeling. Yeah, the chips will be on the table.” Jackson, passing reporters in the hallway after this, declined requests for comment.
When the trade deadline passed and Anthony changed neither uniform nor zip code, as he suspected all along, it seemed logical to assume the drama was done. “Nah, this is New York. There’s always drama,” Anthony said.
If Tracy McGrady were in Carmelo Anthony’s shoes, the reaction to Phil Jackson’s subliminal shots would be a lot different and a lot more confrontational. That’s according to the recent Hall of Fame nominee, who on Saturday unloaded on the Knicks president for his handling of Anthony.
Tracy McGrady: “I think it affects (the Knicks) in free agency. Not only in that situation but all the things that have accumulated over this season. Phil Jackson going at Melo publicly. Like, what are you doing? You’re supposed to be on the same team. Like you’re supposed to be encouraging your brother and giving him some of you expertise and helping him become a better player. And it’s just an unfortunate situation. I feel bad for Melo. But he’s handled it so well. Me in that situation? It probably would be a different story.”
Chris Paul, the president of the Players Association, was here for union meetings, and voiced his displeasure for how Charles Oakley was treated by the Knicks and threw his support at Anthony as he deals with trade rumors and how he’s being treated by team president Phil Jackson.
“Melo is like my brother,” Paul said. “Anything affecting him at times it can affect me. I can’t speak for his team or what’s going on there but it’s probably not beneficial when you’re talking about your players in the paper.” The Clippers point guard was referring to Jackson’s tweets and the perception that some critical articles written recently about Anthony were from Jackson or people close to him.
Some in the organization believe that Anthony won't want to give Jackson the satisfaction of running him out of town. Anthony on Wednesday didn't sound like a player who was ready to leave. He talked about wanting to recruit free agents to New York when asked about the subject; he also acknowledged that he still holds out hope of one day playing with the Clippers' Chris Paul and the Bulls' Dwyane Wade. "A dream," Anthony called it.
Carmelo Anthony’s high school coach says he’s “shocked” by some of Phil Jackson’s comments regarding the Knicks star, and adds “enough is enough” when it comes to the treatment of Anthony in New York. “I don’t know if that’s just part of the business but yeah I’m shocked at some of the stuff I’ve heard him say, and some of his Tweets,” legendary Oak Hill Academy (VA) coach Steve Smith said Thursday on The 4 Quarters Podcast. “It’s surprising because I know Melo loves his hometown and playing with the Knicks but it’s just going South right now. It’s going South fast, and I’m sure he’s not happy but he doesn’t come come across [that way]. He’s making himself proud the way he’s handling the whole situation.
Ian Begley: Carmelo Anthony again takes the high road on Phil Jackson's tweets. He jokes that Phil got the wrong animal when he made a leopard reference
New York Knicks president Phil Jackson’s public campaign to pressure Carmelo Anthony into waiving his no-trade clause is working to harden Anthony’s resolve to remain with the franchise, league sources told The Vertical. “[Jackson’s underestimating ‘Melo’s willingness to stay,” a source familiar with Anthony’s thinking told The Vertical.
Barkley also criticized New York Knicks president Phil Jackson for his role in the Carmelo Anthony trade fiasco. "He's trying to piss Carmelo off enough that he accepts a trade. Very simple. Carmelo has a no trade (clause), and he's trying to make him so mad that he accepts a trade. That's the only thing it can be. I mean, he gave him a no trade, there's nothing he can do about it, he wants to start rebuilding and he can't do it as long as Carmelo's there."
Ian Begley: This Phil Jackson tweet references an article that is critical of Carmelo Anthony. It's more evidence that Phil wants to trade Anthony. - RT: Phil Jackson: Bleacher's Ding almost rings the bell, but I learned you don't change the spot on a leopard with Michael Graham in my CBA daze.
James, who will play at the Garden Saturday night, pulled the equivalent of a “no comment” when asked about the fractured relationship of Anthony and Phil Jackson. “It’s not for me comment on. Like I said, I can’t really comment on somebody else’s relationship,” James said. “I can only give my advice and words of encouragement (to Carmelo). It’s like if you’re trying to comment on somebody else’s marriage. You’re not with them every day. You don’t know what they’re going through. You don’t where the communication broke down, so you can’t comment on that. That’s what (journalists) do. I just want the best for him. And I want him to be happy playing the game he loves. If it’s here great. If it’s not, then great as here as well.”
Asked if he got the sense that management wanted him to stay with the Knicks, Anthony said: "It was a quick meeting. That's all I can say."
Storyline: Jackson-Anthony Dynamic
More HoopsHype Rumors
September 28, 2021 | 10:50 am EDT Update

Ben Simmons not interested in playing with Joel Embiid anymore

Yet of all the problem areas to explore, there’s none more unyielding and impossible to ignore than this: People who have intimate knowledge of how he sees this situation continue to insist that he’s done playing with Embiid. There’s nothing personal about this choice, it seems, but the 25-year-old Simmons has clearly decided that his career is better off without Embiid blocking the runways in the paint that he so badly needs to succeed.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 334 more rumors
“I watched last night a player lead their team to victory where a thousand pounds of digital ink were spilled on how much he would never play for that team again,” Morey had said of the Green Bay Packers star who led a last-second win over the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday night after looking destined for a divorce with the franchise just months ago. “Look, every situation is different, but we have a lot of optimism that we can make it work here. …Ben’s a great player, and we expect him back. We expect him to be a 76er.” Cue the response. “It’s total bullshit,” one source with knowledge of Simmons’ outlook said of Morey’s analysis.
Truth be told, sources say Simmons thought he would have been traded by now. When he met with the Sixers brass at the Los Angeles home of his agent, Rich Paul, in August, telling managing partner Josh Harris in direct fashion that he no longer wanted to play for his club, the goal was to avoid this sort of mess. Sources say the Sixers had come equipped with all sorts of reasons that he should want to stay, and even supported the argument with a statistically based presentation featuring the success of the Embiid-Simmons pairing. But his view, his uneasy feelings about the problematic fit remained unchanged.
Early on last season, when the intel coming the Philadelphia 76ers guard’s way indicated that he’d likely be trading places with then Rockets-star James Harden, Simmons was so convinced that new Sixers president Daryl Morey was about to reunite with his favorite franchise player that he started researching on the real estate front. If you had to pinpoint a moment when emotional ties were severed between Simmons and the only NBA franchise he has ever known, that may have been it.
Storyline: Ben Simmons Trade?
Kevin Porter Jr.’s presence in Houston is much more than basketball “This organization saved my life potentially.” The room stood still for a moment when Porter spoke about the importance of the Houston Rockets to his personal life. So often when we talk about trades, we look at how Player X can impact a new team. But we rarely look at the other side of the game, the mental side. Porter’s past is well-documented, and he spoke about his tough upbringing. In Cleveland, he didn’t truly feel like it was the right place for him or his growth. Being traded to the Rockets was “a breath of fresh air.”